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Etiology of disc degeneration related to low back pain.

Authors
Smith-SD; Lafferty-JF; Winter-WG
Source
University of Kentucky, Lexington, Kentucky 1979 Jan; :1-8
Link
NIOSHTIC No.
00181036
Abstract
An animal model of stress induced intervertebral disc degeneration was developed to verify whether degeneration changes morphological, physiological and material properties of the disc, and to verify whether degeneration causes painful disability. The animal model was developed with Rhesus-monkeys and then Cynomologus-monkeys, the change being necessitated due to difficulties in supplying animals for study. A repeatable degree of disc degeneration could be produced surgically in these animal models when known time and stress parameters were available. The animals were sacrificed 90 days after surgery and the lumbar spine removed for examination. Preliminary studies indicated that compressed discs lose some of their important viscoelastic properties, making them susceptible to high rate loading damage. Increased pressure caused the progressive loss of the fibro/cellular interface between disc and endplate. No significant flattening of the chondrocytes was noted, at least at the endplate. When examining the annulus fibrosus, the lacunae of the compressed annulus were considerably flatter and smaller, and the loss of polysaccharide matrix was evident in the inner layers. Changes in the nucleus primarily were a reduction in volume, due to the expulsion of fluid. Cytological changes were noted in the chondrocytes of both the endplates and annuli of compressed discs. In late stages the animals appeared to be uncomfortable and they reduced their activity level, but severe pain did not appear to be evident.
Keywords
NIOSH-Grant; Back-injuries; Musculoskeletal-system-disorders; Models; Laboratory-animals; Skeletal-system-disorders
Contact
Mechanical Engineering University of Kentucky Lexington, KY 40506 Lexington, KY 40506
Publication Date
19790101
Document Type
Final Grant Report
Funding Amount
178750
Funding Type
Grant
Fiscal Year
1979
NTIS Accession No.
PB88-247002
NTIS Price
A02
Identifying No.
Grant-Number-R01-OH-00562
NIOSH Division
OEP
Priority Area
Musculoskeletal-system-disorders
Source Name
University of Kentucky, Lexington, Kentucky
State
KY
Performing Organization
University of Kentucky, Lexington, Kentucky
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