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Inhalable Fibrous Material.

Authors
Cralley-LJ
Source
Pneumoconiosis, Proceedings of the International Conference, Johannesburg 1969 1970:70-73
Link
NIOSHTIC No.
00177489
Abstract
The occurrence of respirable fibrous materials in the environment was discussed. Sources of inhalable fibrous materials were reviewed. Natural minerals constitute a major source of respirable fibers. There are more than 100 different natural minerals that have some degree of fibrous character. Silicates constitute the most important group of fibrous materials and are the most important constituent of the earth's rocks and crust. Exposures to respirable fibers arise from natural forces such as dust storms, industrial processes, and personal habits, such as using talcum powder. Synthetic mineral fibers and their uses were mentioned. Synthetic organic fibers and their uses were summarized. Fibrous animal and vegetable materials were discussed. Typical examples of respirable fibrous materials associated with commercial and domestic products were illustrated. Analytical techniques for identifying fibrous materials were summarized, including electron microscopy, electron diffraction, laser spectroscopy, electron microprobe, and laser microprobe used in conjunction with time of flight mass spectrometry. It was noted that because of the very small size of individual respirable fibers, a single method is usually not sufficient to identify individual fibers, especially inhaled fibers which are usually transformed by biological processes.
Keywords
Fibrous-dusts; Dust-inhalation; Airborne-fibers; Analytical-methods; Nonmetallic-minerals; Silica-dusts; Environmental-exposure; Synthetic-fibers;
Publication Date
19700101
Document Type
Conference/Symposia Proceedings;
Editors
Shapiro-HA;
Fiscal Year
1970
NTIS Accession No.
NTIS Price
Source Name
Pneumoconiosis, Proceedings of the International Conference, Johannesburg 1969
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