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Stress/strain and linespeed in paced work.

Authors
Stammerjohn-LW Jr.; Wilkes-B
Source
Machine Pacing and Occupational Stress, Proceedings of the International Conference, Purdue University, 1981 Mar; :287-293
Link
NIOSHTIC No.
00176173
Abstract
A study of the relation between stress and strain and line speed in paced work was conducted. The cohort consisted of 638 United States Department of Agriculture poultry inspectors at 121 poultry processing facilities (SIC-2015) in the United States. The inspectors performed postmortem inspections of poultry carcasses on a machine paced production line. The line speed was rigidly controlled and usually ranged from 15 to 23 carcasses per minute. The subjects completed questionnaires requesting demographic information and information about conditions in the workplace and health status. The questionnaires also contained scales measuring job related stress and strain and asked the respondents to report both the line speed at which they worked and the linespeed they preferred. Data from 418 respondents were analyzed in terms of the difference between the actual and preferred number of carcasses inspected per minute, denoted PACE-FIT. Measures of strain such as job dissatisfaction, workload dissatisfaction, boredom, tension or anxiety, depression or dejection, fatigue or inertia, anger or hostility, visual function complaints, and emotion or mood complaints were significantly associated with the PACE-FIT scores. Lowest strain levels for tension or anxiety, depression or dejection, anger and hostility, boredom, workload dissatisfaction, and emotion or mood complaints were associated with preferred and actual line speeds being approximately equal, a PACE-FIT score of 0. The authors conclude that machine paced work definitely causes increased strain. Minimum strain levels for many measures of strain are associated with operators working at their own pace.
Keywords
Job-stress; Epidemiology; Automation; Repetitive-work; Psychophysiology; Poultry-workers; Psychological-factors; Task-performance; Occupational-health
Publication Date
19810101
Document Type
Conference/Symposia Proceedings
Editors
Salvendy-G; Smith-MJ
Fiscal Year
1981
NTIS Accession No.
NTIS Price
SIC Code
2015
Source Name
Machine Pacing and Occupational Stress, Proceedings of the International Conference, Purdue University, March 1981
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