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Relevance of grain dust collection techniques to respiratory disease studies.

Authors
Peach-MJ III; Olenchock-SA; Sorenson-WG; Major-PC
Source
Occupational Pulmonary Disease, Focus on Grain Dust and Health, Proceedings of the International Symposium on Grain Dust and Health, Saskatoon, Canada, November 7-9, 1977. New York: Academic Press, Inc. 1980 Jan; :507-512
Link
NIOSHTIC No.
00175639
Abstract
A method currently employed for collection of airborne, respirable, parent (dust cloud) grain dust antigens from single grains to be used in respiratory disease studies was described. Airborne parent rye dust and whole rye grain dust were collected at a terminal grain elevator in Duluth, Minnesota/Superior, Wisconsin. Airborne dust was collected with a high volume (3.54 cubic meters/minute) dust collection system (Imperial 250 IV Multi clean) that retained particles as small as 0.25 microns with efficiency greater than 99.5 percent. Artificial whole rye grain dust was prepared by freezing rye collected directly from the grain transport belt in liquid nitrogen and grinding it such that over half of the particles were less than 5 microns in size. Both dusts were assayed for reduction of hemolytic complement activity (CH50) in-vitro. Quantifiable differences between the in-vitro activities of the airborne workplace dust and the artificial grain dust were observed; greater CH50 reductions were obtained by the airborne dust. The authors suggest that airborne natural grain dusts can induce biological responses quantitatively different from artificially generated dusts of whole grain and that this may be due to contaminants present in the parent dusts. They also determined that more than 1,000 grams of airborne dust of oats, rye, corn, barley, durum-wheat, or spring wheat could be collected in 4 to 5 hours utilizing the described method. The authors suggest that this amount should be sufficient for respiratory disease studies.
Keywords
Pulmonary-system-disorders; Grain-elevators; Dust-collection; Airborne-dusts; Grain-dusts; Toxins; Dust-sampling; Occupational-exposure; Antigens
Publication Date
19800101
Document Type
Conference/Symposia Proceedings
Editors
Dosman-JA; Cotton-DJ
Fiscal Year
1980
NTIS Accession No.
NTIS Price
Priority Area
Pulmonary-system-disorders
Source Name
Occupational Pulmonary Disease, Focus on Grain Dust and Health, Proceedings of the International Symposium on Grain Dust and Health, Saskatoon, Canada, November 7-9, 1977
State
MN; WI; NY
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