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Potential health hazards in taxidermy shops.

Authors
Boiano-JM
Source
Am Taxidermist Mag 1984 May; 19(5):34-38
Link
NIOSHTIC No.
00175551
Abstract
A survey was conducted at five taxidermy shops in Pennsylvania in 1983 to determine the types of hazards which may be present. Inhalation exposures to taxidermists consisted primarily of dusts and vapors arising from dusting the skins of animals with preservatives such as borax, sanding a urethane body form, mixing papier mache, blowing sawdust from feathers or furs, combining hair or fur with hair dressing, or shaping skull caps for displays. Vapors arose from using epoxy or other resin systems, smoothing polymerized epoxy resin with solvent, applying paints or similar materials by hand or airbrush, and the use of solvents or tanning solutions including 1,1,1-trichloroethane (71556) and perchloroethylene (127184). The potential also existed for skin problems through exposure to solvents, tanning creams, resins, or paints. The author concludes that considering the materials used and the duration and frequency of exposures, the taxidermists are not likely to be overexposed to dusts or vapors, provided that they do not use carcinogens or especially hazardous materials. The author recommends that substitutes should be found for the following agents: asbestos (1332214), arsenic (7440382), benzene (71432), carbon-tetrachloride (56235), formaldehyde (50000), methylene- chloride (75092), perchloroethylene, and trichloroethylene (79016). A forced draft ventilation system is recommended for taxidermy shops. Good work practices should be followed including washing of hands frequently in soap and water; avoidance of smoking, drinking, or eating in the work areas; vacuuming and wet mopping the work area often; storage of chemicals safely; and the presence of a usable fire extinguisher. Personal protective equipment should include the use of aprons and gloves, and safety glasses for specific types of work.
Keywords
Dust-inhalation; Solvent-vapors; Organic-solvents; Chlorinated-hydrocarbons; Skin-exposure; Lung-irritants; Pulmonary-system-disorders; Epoxy-resins; Animal-products
CAS No.
71-55-6; 127-18-4; 1332-21-4; 7440-38-2; 71-43-2; 56-23-5; 50-00-0; 75-09-2; 79-01-6
Publication Date
19840501
Document Type
Journal Article
Fiscal Year
1984
NTIS Accession No.
NTIS Price
Issue of Publication
5
ISSN
1082-6262
Priority Area
Pulmonary-system-disorders
Source Name
American Taxidermist Magazine
State
PA
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