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Childhood leukemia and parents' occupational and home exposures.

Authors
Lowengart-RA; Peters-JM; Cicioni-C; Buckley-J; Bernstein-L; Preston-Martin-S; Rappaport-E
Source
J Natl Cancer Inst 1987 Jul; 79(1):39-46
NIOSHTIC No.
00171893
Abstract
A case/control study was made of the effect of parents' exposure to chemicals and other products on the incidence of leukemia in their children. Cases of acute leukemia were identified from the population based cancer registry, the Los Angeles County Cancer Surveillance Program. The patients were eligible for inclusion in the study if they were less than 10 years old at the time of diagnosis (1980 to 1984), and if the biological mother was available for interview. Comparisons were selected from among friends of the patients or by random digit dialing; they were matched, as closely as possible, to the patients by race, ethnicity, sex, and age. There were 107 cases with acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL) and 16 cases with acute nonlymphocytic leukemia (ANLL). The analysis showed a statistically significant risk of leukemia for children whose fathers had been occupationally exposed, after the birth of the children and mainly during the first year of life, to chlorinated solvents, spray paints, dyes or pigments, methyl-ethyl- ketone (78933) and cutting oil. The children were also at an increased risk if the parents used pesticides or burned incense in the home. Few of the mothers were occupationally exposed to the above mentioned chemicals. Fathers working in transportation equipment manufacture had a higher risk of having a leukemic child which is suggested to be due to specific exposures in that industry. A significant risk was associated with mothers who worked in personal service industries. The authors state that their results are consistent with those of animal studies which show that carcinogenic compounds are more likely to induce leukemia in mice exposed shortly after birth than in those exposed in-utero or as adults.
Keywords
NIOSH-Publication; NIOSH-Grant; Epidemiology; Occupational-hazards; Organic-solvents; Organic-vapors; Solvent-vapors; Spray-painting; Dye-industry; Families; Leukemogenesis; Lymphatic-cancer; Cancer-rates; Pesticide-industry
Contact
Family and Preventive Medicine University of Southern Calif 2025 Zonal Ave Los Angeles, Calif 90033
CODEN
JNCIAM
CAS No.
78-93-3
Publication Date
19870701
Document Type
Journal Article
Funding Amount
476355.00
Funding Type
Grant
Fiscal Year
1987
NTIS Accession No.
NTIS Price
Identifying No.
Grant-Number-R01-OH-01413
Issue of Publication
1
ISSN
0027-8874
Source Name
Journal of the National Cancer Institute
State
CA
Performing Organization
University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California
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