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Physicochemical properties of quartz controlling biological activity.

Authors
Langer-AM; Nolan-RP
Source
Silica, silicosis, and cancer: controversy in occupational medicine. Goldsmith DF, Winn DM, Shy CM, eds. New York: Praeger, 1986 Jan; :125-135
Link
NIOSHTIC No.
00171375
Abstract
The physicochemical properties of quartz (14808607) that control its biological activity were reviewed. Topics included the chemical properties of quartz in relation to biological activity, quartz as a powder, the relationship of surface properties to biological activity, experimental methods used for the study of the effects of inorganic dusts, hemolytic properties of quartz specimens from different geological localities, particle size, surface chemistry, fibrogenesis, carcinogenesis, and properties which impart biological activity. The presence of trace elements, derivatives, or stuffed derivatives in quartz was shown to reduce the biological activity of quartz. Factors which may affect the biological activity of powdered quartz included surface properties, hydration, and particle size. Surface properties which may affect activity included surface hydration, hydrogen bonding at the quartz surface, and surface charges. The red cell hemolysis system was used as a measure of cytotoxicity. Comparison of the hemolytic potency of five natural quartz minerals indicated that there was a five fold difference in red blood cell membrane activity among specimens tested. Hemolytic activity varied with particle size when industrial silica flour specimens were used. Results supported the idea that membrane activity is related to surface character and chemistry in quartz. Hemolytic activity increased with available ionized surface sites and increase in surface area.
Keywords
NIOSH-Grant; Chemical-properties; Physical-properties; Surface-properties; Minerals; Particulate-dust; Silicon-compounds; Red-blood-cells; Biological-effects
Contact
Medicine MT Sinai School of Medicine 1 Gustave Levy Place New York, N Y 10029
CAS No.
14808-60-7
Publication Date
19860101
Document Type
Book or book chapter
Editors
Goldsmith-DF; Winn-DM; Shy-CM
Funding Amount
19495
Funding Type
Grant
Fiscal Year
1986
NTIS Accession No.
NTIS Price
ISBN No.
9780275913052
Identifying No.
Grant-Number-R03-OH-01905
Source Name
Silica, silicosis, and cancer: controversy in occupational medicine
State
NY
Performing Organization
Mount Sinai School of Medicine, New York, New York
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