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An evaluation of benzene in the presence of gasoline by active and passive sampling methods.

Authors
Spielman-CR; Blehm-KD; Buchan-RM; Hagar-RN
Source
Appl Ind Hyg 1987 Mar; 2(2):66-70
NIOSHTIC No.
00170996
Abstract
The ability of passive organic vapor monitors (POVM) and activated charcoal tubes (ACT) to measure benzene (71432) vapor concentration in gasoline vapors was studied. The standard ACT and three brands of POVMs were chosen: the 3M 3520 Organic Vapor Monitor (OVM); the SKC Solid Sorbent Badge 530 Series with Anasorb CA capsules (SKC); and the MSA Vaporgard Organic Vapor Dosimeter. For each POVM and the ACT, six sets of samplers were placed in an exposure chamber and exposed for 4 hours to 3, 15, 30, and 60mg/m3 of air with a gasoline concentration of approximately 250mg/m3. The gasoline and benzene concentrations in the chamber were monitored by gas chromatography and infrared spectrophotometry. The sorbent section of each monitor was desorbed in carbon-disulfide for 30 minutes, and the samples were injected into a Hewlett Packard high efficiency gas chromatograph. The ACTs, OVMs, and SKCs met the NIOSH acceptability criteria of an overall system accuracy of less than or equal to 25 percent. The accuracy of the ACTs and the OVMs were best (19 percent), but the precision of the OVMs was better than that of the ACTs. MSA dosimeter blanks showed significant benzene levels, resulting in data which were not judged acceptable. The ACTs and SKCs were the only samplers significantly in agreement relative to concentration measurements. The authors conclude that POVMs meeting the NIOSH standards perform as well as the ACT and that a complex mixture of organic vapors may adversely affect the overall accuracy of measurement of a single component of the mixture. They recommend that, because a direct comparison of one adsorption technique to another can lead to false conclusions regarding precision and accuracy, an independent method of sampling should be used in comparative trials.
Keywords
NIOSH-Publication; NIOSH-Grant; Monocyclic-aromatic-hydrocarbons; Organic-vapors; Fuels; Air-sampling; Sampling-methods; Laboratory-testing; Air-sampling-equipment
CODEN
AIHYEX
CAS No.
71-43-2
Publication Date
19870301
Document Type
Journal Article
Funding Amount
1026046.00
Funding Type
Grant
Fiscal Year
1987
NTIS Accession No.
NTIS Price
Identifying No.
Grant-Number-T03-OH-07039
Issue of Publication
2
ISSN
0882-8032
Source Name
Applied Industrial Hygiene
State
CO
Performing Organization
Microbiology Colorado State University 110 Veterinary Science Bldg FT Collins, Colo 80523
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