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Occupational health and clinical training.

Authors
Sokas-RK; Cloeren-M
Source
J Occup Med 1987 May; 29(5):414-416
NIOSHTIC No.
00170064
Abstract
A cross sectional survey of medical students, interns, and clinicians was conducted to determine whether attitudes and/or knowledge of occupational health varied with stage of medical training, educational, experiential or demographic factors. A brief questionnaire assessing attitudes towards and knowledge of occupational health was distributed to 66 medical students beginning their medicine clerkships, 94 interns beginning an internship year in primary care medicine, and 22 practicing primary care clinicians. The overall response rate was approximately 96 percent. Interns recalled an average of 8 hours training in occupational medicine during medical school, while medical students and clinicians recalled 5 and 3.6 hours, respectively. However, nearly one third of the interns recalled no training in occupational medicine. Clinicians and interns outperformed students on factual knowledge of occupational health, mainly due to more knowledge of musculoskeletal disorders. Clinicians' ratings of the importance of occupational health were significantly lower than those of either students or interns. Medical students from blue collar families scored significantly higher than those from white collar families both on the importance attributed to occupational health and on knowledge of the area. There was no correlation between number of hours of occupational medicine training and knowledge of or the importance attributed to occupational health in any of the groups. Women from all levels of training scored significantly higher than men on both the importance attributed to and knowledge of occupational health. The authors conclude that importance attributed to occupational health declines with training, and that postgraduate training in occupational medicine may be necessary before effective changes in undergraduate medical teaching can be made.
Keywords
JOCMA7; NIOSH-Publication; NIOSH-Grant; Cardiovascular-system-disorders; Physicians; Occupational-health; Sex-factors; Questionnaires; Epidemiology; Education; Occupational-medicine
Contact
Medicine 3 Silverstein Hosp of U of P 3400 Spruce Street Philadelphia, PA 19104
CODEN
JOCMA7
Publication Date
19870501
Document Type
Journal Article
Funding Amount
51840.00
Funding Type
Grant
Fiscal Year
1987
NTIS Accession No.
NTIS Price
Identifying No.
Grant-Number-K01-OH-00011
Issue of Publication
5
ISSN
0096-1736
Priority Area
Special Populations; Work Environment and Workforce
Source Name
Journal of Occupational Medicine
State
PA
Performing Organization
University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania
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