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Overview and summary: Workshop on the Chernoff/Kavlock preliminary developmental toxicity test.

Authors
Hardin-BD; Becker-RA; Kavlock-RJ; Seidenberg-JM; Chernoff-N
Source
Teratog, Carcinog, Mutagen 1987 Jan; 7(1):119-127
NIOSHTIC No.
00169372
Abstract
The views presented at a workshop on the Chernoff/Kavlock assay (CKA) were summarized, and information from three major testing programs on 165 chemicals was consolidated. Of 58 chemicals classified as developmentally toxic and 34 classified as nontoxic, 49 were identified by CKA as developmentally toxic and 28 as nontoxic. Equivocal results were obtained for four toxic and for two nontoxic chemicals. Five developmentally toxic and four developmentally nontoxic chemicals were classified incorrectly. The participants agreed on several aspects. Performing tests at two dose levels would increase predictive value. Reduced terminal body weight and diminished body weight gain over selected intervals were proposed as alternative indices of maternal toxicity. Predictive values of the test would be increased if the same species were used in followup studies. Data supported the use of rats in the assay. Each chemical must be evaluated individually. Any adverse effect was considered as evidence of potential developmental toxicity. The practical need was recognized to establish priorities for further testing within a set of chemicals that produced some effect in CKA. Compared to other programs, CKA did not require a high degree of technical expertise and provided data on neonatal viability. CKA provided information on maternal (mortality, body weight, and body weight changes) and developmental toxicity (viable litters, number of live pups per viable litter, percent neonatal survival for several postnatal days, average weight, and average weight gain). The participants assessed CKA as a useful testing alternative that was validated for general application.
Keywords
NIOSH-Author; In-vivo-studies; Laboratory-animals; Toxic-materials; Acute-toxicity; Embryotoxicity; Teratogens; Environmental-hazards; Screening-methods; Inorganic-chemicals; Organic-chemicals; Reproductive-hazards; Author Keywords: in vivo screen; teratogen; hazard detection; rodent; pregnancy outcome; neonatal viability
Contact
Bryan D. Hardin, Division of Standards Development and Technology Transfer, National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, 4676 Columbia Parkway, Cincinnati, Ohio 45226
CODEN
TCMUD8
Publication Date
19870101
Document Type
Journal Article
Fiscal Year
1987
NTIS Accession No.
NTIS Price
Issue of Publication
1
ISSN
0270-3211
NIOSH Division
DSDTT
Source Name
Teratogenesis, Carcinogenesis, and Mutagenesis
State
OH; CA; NC
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