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A cohort mortality study of painters and allied tradesmen.

Authors
Matanoski-GM; Stockwell-HG; Diamond-EL; Haring-Sweeney-M; Joffe-RD; Mele-LM; Johnson-ML
Source
Scand J Work, Environ & Health 1986 Feb; 12(1):16-21
NIOSHTIC No.
00158087
Abstract
A study of mortality among painters and allied tradesmen was conducted. The cohort consisted of 51,175 current and former members of the International Brotherhood of Painters and Allied Trades from 1975 through 1979. The cohort included glaziers and tile and carpet layers as well as painters. Cohort deaths were identified through a search of the life insurance files of the union, and records of the Social Security Administration, the National Death Index, and the Health Care Financing Administration. A total of 5,313 deaths occurred and death certificates were obtained for 5,025 of these. Overall cohort mortality was 88 percent of that expected for US white males. The deficit was due primarily to low rates for all circulatory diseases, except rheumatic heart disease. The cohort was then subdivided by local affiliation as either painter or allied trade. Members of locals consisting primarily of painters had significantly elevated mortality from all malignant neoplasms, lung cancer, and stomach cancer. The mortality among allied trade locals was decreased except for mortality due to large intestinal and thyroid cancer. The authors suggest that painters and allied tradesmen have different mortality patterns, particularly for malignant neoplasms.
Keywords
NIOSH-Author; Safety-education; Occupational-exposure; Safety-monitoring; Accidents; Workers; Industrial-environment; Work-performance; Hazards; Quantitative-analysis; Occupational-hazards; Industrial-exposures
CODEN
SWEHDO
Publication Date
19860201
Document Type
Journal Article
Fiscal Year
1986
NTIS Accession No.
NTIS Price
Issue of Publication
1
ISSN
0355-3140
Source Name
Scandinavian Journal of Work, Environment and Health
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