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Acute effects of lead on the renal handling of zinc in dogs.

Authors
Victery-W; Soifer-NE; Weiss-JS; Vander-AJ
Source
Toxicol Appl Pharmacol 1981 Dec; 61(3):358-367
NIOSHTIC No.
00156029
Abstract
Effects of acute lead (7439921) administration on renal excretion of zinc (7440666) were investigated in dogs. Urinary zinc excretion was monitored in male dogs anesthetized with 30 milligrams per kilogram (mg/kg) pentobarbital before and 4 hours after lead exposure. Lead was administered as a low or high dose in an initial intravenous priming dose of 3.0 or 0.3mg/kg lead-acetate, followed by infusion of 0.57 or 0.057mg lead/minute. Controls received sodium-acetate. In another group of dogs, zinc-65 was administered as an intravenous infusion of 10 micrograms (microg)/kg/minute with lead. Ultrafiltrable zinc was determined 1 hour later, and stop flow pattern analysis was used. Other indices of renal function and plasma zinc concentrations were also followed. Zinc excretion in controls was relatively constant over the 4 hours, but it rose above baseline values an average of 140 nanograms (ng)/minute in low lead dogs and an average of 300ng/minute in high lead animals. Urinary excretion of protein, sodium, potassium, and magnesium were relatively constant. Plasma zinc concentrations were stable in controls and low lead dogs, but rose an average of 120microg/100 milliliters in the high lead group. In clearance experiments, zinc excretion was 7 fold higher in lead treated dogs; plasma zinc concentration was insignificantly elevated. Ultrafiltrable zinc concentration was 2.5 fold higher and fractional zinc excretion was 3 times higher in lead treated animals. The stop flow pattern for zinc after lead treatment showed no alteration in distal tubular zinc handling but revealed prominent net proximal tubular secretion of zinc in all animals. The authors conclude that acute lead treatment in dogs produces increased ultrafiltrable plasma zinc and altered renal tubular zinc transport.
Keywords
NIOSH-Publication; NIOSH-Grant; Grants-other; Exposure-levels; Analytical-models; Metabolites; Tissue-distribution; Metabolism; Physiology; Cytology; Chemical-analysis; Blood-sampling; Biological-effects; Laboratory-animals
Contact
Physiology University of Michigan 6811 Medical Science II Ann Arbor, Mich
CODEN
TXAPA9
CAS No.
7439-92-1; 7440-66-6
Publication Date
19811201
Document Type
Journal Article
Funding Amount
243305
Funding Type
Grant
Fiscal Year
1982
NTIS Accession No.
NTIS Price
Identifying No.
Grant-Number-R01-OH-00913
Issue of Publication
3
ISSN
0041-008X
Priority Area
Other Occupational Concerns; Grants-other;
Source Name
Toxicology and Applied Pharmacology
State
MI
Performing Organization
University of Michigan at Ann Arbor, Ann Arbor, Michigan
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