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The sleep process of rabbits exposed to low intensity non-ionizing electromagnetic radiation. I. development of methodology.

Authors
Manthei-RC; Glaser-ZR
Source
Biol Effects Electromag Waves 1976 Dec; 1:341-351
Link
NIOSHTIC No.
00155001
Abstract
A method for measuring effects of microwave energy on the frequency and duration of paradoxical sleep episodes was developed. Three unique aspects of the method were the use of an implantable all plastic electrode assembly, the use of logic circuitry to control long term sleep studies, and video equipment that simultaneously records the sleeping animal and its polygraph record. The all plastic implant assembly permitted simultaneous recording of the electrocorticogram, electrooculogram, and electromyogram. All signals were taken from two animals simultaneously and displayed at the polygraph pens. Logic circuitry was designed to control activation of the chart drive, pens, and a video tape recorder. Either animal could activate the equipment if the conditions of paradoxical sleep were met. A high speed printer was used to record the frequency and duration of these episodes. A special effects generator in the video system permitted simultaneous display of the animal and its polygraph record. Male Dutch-rabbits were fitted with an electrode assembly, allowed 2 weeks of recovery, fitted with an electrode cable, and allowed 1 week adaptation before irradiation. Animals were irradiated 2 hours daily for 60 days with 3.7 gigaHertz microwave irradiation at a power density of 10 milliWatts per square centimeter. Control animals were subjected to sham irradiation under double blind conditions. Following irradiation animals were held 24 hours before being recorded. Preliminary data indicated that about 25 to 35 minutes of sleep was exclusively paradoxical sleep and that it was intermittently dispersed throughout the recording session. Data from irradiated animals had not been processed. The authors conclude that the techniques should result in expanded understanding of brain electrical phenomena associated with microwave irradiation.
Keywords
Radiation-monitoring; Analytical-chemistry; Laboratory-animals; Biological-effects; Electrical-measurement; Radiation-measurement; Analytical-methods; Exposure-limits; Exposure-levels
Publication Date
19761201
Document Type
Conference/Symposia Proceedings
Fiscal Year
1977
NTIS Accession No.
NTIS Price
Source Name
Biological Effects of Electromagnetic Waves
State
MD
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