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Acute respiratory reactions to cotton dust in healthy non-textile workers.

Authors
Castellan-RM; Hankinson-JL; Cocke-JB
Source
Cotton dust: proceedings of the Ninth Cotton Dust Research Conference, beltwide cotton research conferences, January 9-11, 1985, New Orleans, Louisiana
Link
NIOSHTIC No.
00149233
Abstract
Acute respiratory reactions to cotton dust were evaluated in healthy workers not from the textile industry. Volunteers from the general working public were selected in South Carolina. Each was given a standard respiratory questionnaire including occupational and smoking histories. Each was also tested by spirometry using waterless spirometers directly interfaced with oscilloscopes. Forced vital capacity (FVC) was determined. Flow/volume curves and corrected force expiratory volume in the first second (FEV1) results were displayed as each forced expiratory maneuver was performed. Subjects with respiratory illness or deviations from the predicted were excluded. Subjects were exposed twice to cotton dust at about 1.0 milligram per cubic meter of air or twice to clean air, with at least 2 days between exposures. After 6 hours in exposure conditions, subjects repeated spirometry performed preexposure. Respiratory symptoms associated with cotton dust were experienced by 30 percent during the first dust exposure and 34 percent in the second. In the first exposure females had more symptoms than males and those over age 30 had more symptoms. Those with no prior cotton mill employment were more likely to have symptoms. In the second exposure only the reduction among prior mill workers remained statistically significant. In the clean air experiments only 0.7 and 0.5 percent of subjects had FEV1 decrement in the first and second exposures. In dust exposures, 8.6 and 12.5 percent, respectively had FEV1 decrements. Race was not significantly associated with ventilatory response, but chronic cigarette smoking was a significant risk factor for ventilatory reaction. A low baseline FEV1/FVC ratio was the most important risk factor associated with acute response. The authors conclude that the primary determinant in healthy non asthmatic subjects is the exposure itself. Environmental control should remain the mainstay by byssinosis prevention.
Keywords
Medical-research; Humans; Industrial-dusts; Airborne-fibers; Biological-effects; Lung-function; Respiratory-irritants; Lung-irritants; Physiological-measurements; Occupational-respiratory-disease; Control-methods
Publication Date
19850101
Document Type
Conference/Symposia Proceedings
Editors
Wakelyn-PJ; Jacobs-RR
Fiscal Year
1985
NTIS Accession No.
NTIS Price
ISBN No.
9780961340810
Source Name
Cotton dust: proceedings of the Ninth Cotton Dust Research Conference, beltwide cotton research conferences, January 9-11, 1985, New Orleans, Louisiana
State
ME; SC; LA; TN
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