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Effects of vegetable dust extracts on cellular immune responses.

Authors
Lewis-DM; Mentnech-MS; Olenchock-SA
Source
Cotton dust: proceedings of the Eighth Cotton Dust Research Conference, beltwide cotton production research conferences, January 9-10, 1984, Atlanta, Georgia. Wakelyn PJ, Jacobs RR, eds. Memphis, TN: The National Cotton Council of America, 1984 Jan; :143-146
Link
NIOSHTIC No.
00145753
Abstract
Stimulation of interleukin-1 by vegetable dust extracts was studied in rats. Grain dusts of oats, spring wheat, durham wheat, barley, or ground cotton boils were mixed with water and incubated for 1 hour and then centrifuged. Acetone was used to extract one group of cotton samples. The supernatant was filtered and lyophilized. The resulting residue was dissolved in saline at 1 to 5 milligrams per milliliter of dissolved solid. Alveolar macrophages were obtained from rats by pulmonary lavage and cultured. Plates were rinsed with fresh media and fresh medium containing test extract was added. Macrophages were incubated for 18 hours. The media from the cultures were filtered and assayed for interleukin-1 by mouse thymocyte proliferation. A positive control of an Escherichia-coli lipopolysaccharide was used. The gram negative bacterial endotoxin content was determined by spectrophotometry. Extracts of baled cotton from several sources were diluted in culture medium to 10 percent, added to macrophages and assayed. Endotoxin and protein concentration were not related. The stimulation index, the fold increase over negative control, was 50.6 for oats, 40.0 for spring wheat, 50.0 for durham wheat, 8.6 for barley, about 1.9 to 3 for various cottons, and 38.7 for the positive control. Some of the cotton extracts stimulated interleukin-1 production, but there was no direct correlation with endotoxin concentration. Extracts from cotton washed in water did not stimulate interleukin-1 production as well as acetone extracts, stimulation index of 5.6 and 66.9, respectively. The authors conclude that unknown water soluble factors in vegetable dust stimulate the interleukin-1 response.
Keywords
In-vitro-study; Quantitative-analysis; Cell-function; Industrial-dusts; Immune-reaction; Toxicology; Agricultural-products; Dust-analysis; Dose-response; Occupational-respiratory-disease; Medical-research
Publication Date
19840101
Document Type
Conference/Symposia Proceedings
Editors
Wakelyn-PJ; Jacobs-RR
Fiscal Year
1984
NTIS Accession No.
NTIS Price
ISBN No.
9780961340803
Source Name
Cotton dust: proceedings of the Eighth Cotton Dust Research Conference, beltwide cotton production research conferences, January 9-10, 1984, Atlanta, Georgia
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