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Byssinosis: matter from lint to lungs.

Authors
Kilburn-KH; Kilburn-GG; Merchant-JA
Source
Am J Nurs 1973 Nov; 73(11):1952-1958
NIOSHTIC No.
00127490
Abstract
The incidence of byssinosis was studied among 2,967 cotton and other textile workers. Subjects completed questionnaires about respiratory symptoms, and were tested for forced expiratory volume and forced vital capacity before and after 6 hours at work on Monday. Respirable dust was sampled in major work areas using a vertical elutriator. Data on 1,046 female workers was examined to determine the effects of cotton exposure and smoking on rates of byssinosis and chronic bronchitis. Various treatments of cotton were assessed for their ability to lower respirable dust concentrations and the biological response of 12 sensitized subjects. Workers in cotton preparation areas reported the most symptoms and showed greatest decreases in expiratory flow; 40 percent of preparation workers in one cotton mill were diagnosed as byssinotic. Cotton yarn production workers had about 50 percent of the incidence of preparation workers, while only 6 to 7 percent of cotton weavers were affected. Dust concentrations were linearly related to respiratory symptoms, decreases in forced expiratory volume, and prevalence of chronic bronchitis. Even at respirable dust concentrations of 0.1 milligrams per cubic meter (mg/m3) of air, 6.5 percent of cotton workers had symptoms. Compared to nonsmoking workers in cotton/synthetic blends, cotton workers who smoked had over 4 times the risk of developing byssinosis and over 5 times the risk of developing chronic bronchitis. Washing or steaming cotton was effective in reducing biological effects and lowering dust concentrations, while dry heat treatment increased biological effects. The authors recommend the enforcement of a threshold limit value of 0.1 to 0.2mg/m3 respirable dust in cotton textile mills.
Keywords
NIOSH-Publication; NIOSH-Grant; Pulmonary-system-disorders; Disease-incidence; Lung-irritants; Worker-health; Biological-effects; Dust-exposure; Clinical-symptoms; Industrial-medicine; Dust-inhalation; Clinical-diagnosis
Contact
Medicine University of Missouri N424 Medical Center Columbia, MO 65201
CODEN
AJNUAK
Publication Date
19731101
Document Type
Journal Article
Funding Amount
230991
Funding Type
Grant
Fiscal Year
1974
NTIS Accession No.
NTIS Price
Identifying No.
Grant-Number-R01-OH-000511
Issue of Publication
11
ISSN
0002-936X
Priority Area
Pulmonary-system-disorders
Source Name
The American Journal of Nursing
State
MO
Performing Organization
University of Missouri Columbia, Columbia, Missouri
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