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Job decision latitude, job demands, and cardiovascular disease: a prospective study of Swedish men.

Authors
Karasek-R; Baker-D; Marxer-F; Ahlbom-A; Theorell-T
Source
Am J Publ Health 1981 Jul; 71(7):694-705
NIOSHTIC No.
00119565
Abstract
The relationship between job stress and cardiovascular/cerebrovascular death (CHD/CVD) was investigated. In a prospective study, data on CHD/CVD symptoms and mortality and on job demand characteristics was obtained from 1,461 employed males interviewed in 1968 and reinterviewed in 1974. In a case control study records of CHD/CVD deaths registered between 1968 and 1977 were reviewed for occupational data. High paced, psychologically demanding work was associated with an increased risk of coronary heart disease symptoms and early CHD/CVD death. Low decision latitude was also related to increased risk. These relationships remained significant when factors of age, education, smoking habits, and weight were controlled. The authors conclude that psychologically stressful jobs were associated with subsequent cardiovascular disease. Low decision latitude appears to be an independent coronary heart disease risk factor, however multiple work environment factors may be involved.
Keywords
NIOSH-Publication; NIOSH-Grant; Cardiovascular-system-disorders; Health-surveys; Psychological-stress; Mortality-rates; Workers; Work-analysis
Contact
Columbia University, Department of Industrial Engineering and Operations Research, Room 302, Seeley W. Mudd Building, New York, N Y 10027
CODEN
AJHEAA
Publication Date
19810701
Document Type
Journal Article
Funding Amount
444505
Funding Type
Grant
Fiscal Year
1981
NTIS Accession No.
NTIS Price
Identifying No.
Grant-Number-R01-OH-00906
Issue of Publication
7
ISSN
0090-0036
Source Name
American Journal of Public Health
State
ME; NY
Performing Organization
Columbia University, Department of Industrial Engineering and Operations Research, New York, New York
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