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Cadmium exposure and human health effects.

Authors
Hammer-DI; Finklea-JF; Creason-JP; Sandifer-SH; Keil-JE; Priester-LE; Stara-JF
Source
Trace Substances in Environmental Health - V. 1972; :269-283
Link
NIOSHTIC No.
00069241
Abstract
Several sensitive biologic response indicators are studied in 94 Black male workers exposed to a 0.02 percent cadmium (7440439) dust while producing superphosphate fertilizer. Cadmium and zinc (7440666) in plasma, but not in urine are found to be equally elevated in both the intermediate and high exposure groups. Systolic and diastolic blood pressures increase with age as expected, but inconsistently follow the exposure gradient. Cholesterol (57885) levels also show a strong expected relationship to age, but are not consistently related to exposure. Hemoglobin and hematocrit are unrelated to exposure. The data are taken to argue against a strong causal association between cadmium exposure and these cardiovascular disease risk indices. Previous studies linking cadmium to human hypertension and cardiovascular disease is considered tenuous and unconvincing. Autopsy studies demonstrating increased renal cadmium in patients dying with hypertension are shown to be confounded. It is suggested that studying continuous physiologic parameters rather than categorical disease classifications or end stage morbidity or mortality is a more sensitive method of detecting early effects of cadmium or other toxic substances.
Keywords
Heavy-metals; Blood-chemistry; Epidemiology; Cardiovascular-system-disorders; Nervous-system-disorders; Measurement-methods; Etiology; Circulatory-system-disorders; Urine-chemistry; Cadmium; Detection
CAS No.
7440-43-9; 7440-66-6; 57-88-5
Publication Date
19720101
Document Type
Conference/Symposia Proceedings
Editors
Hemphill-DD
Fiscal Year
1972
NTIS Accession No.
NTIS Price
Source Name
Trace Substances in Environmental Health - V
State
MO
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