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NIOSH Hearing Loss Research Program Review NIOSH Publications on Noise and Hearing The National Academies - Advisors to the Nation on Science, Engineering, and Medicine

What does the HLR Program Do?

In this section ....

Partnerships by:

Partnerships

Research Goal 1: Contribute to the Development, Implementation, and Evaluation of Effective Hearing Loss Prevention Program

Allied Construction Industries

Point of contact: Terry Phillips, Director of Safety: http://www.aci-construction.org/

Dates of the collaboration: 2000 – present

Goals or expectation of the collaboration at the outset: Inform companies representing the construction industry in the Ohio-Kentucky-Indiana area about the risk of occupational hearing loss among construction workers, and educate the industry about what they can do to prevent NIPTS (Noise Induced Permanent Threshold Shift).

Nature of the collaboration: HLR program staff has supported the annual ACI-OSHA safety day conference since 2000. We helped educate representatives from 600 companies. We have been invited back every year to give lectures and workshops on hearing loss prevention for the construction industry – both union and non-union companies.

Accomplishments or products generated in this collaboration and/or ongoing activity, including equipment, technologies, publications, research results, etc.: Because of this partnership, the HLR program has gained access to many construction sites (e.g., Great American Ballpark, Paul Brown Stadium, Children’s Hospital, and University of Cincinnati). This partnership has provided field sites for testing equipment and methods, obtaining noise measurements, sampling worker exposures, and making training videos. We have been invited to individual companies as well as other health and safety trade groups (e.g. ASSE, National Safety Council) as a result of contacts made through this partnership. The HLR program has access to a variety of construction sites in the Ohio-Kentucky-Indiana area.

OSHA/NHCA

Point of contact: Sandra J. Khan, DOL-OSHA, Directorate of Cooperative and State Programs, Office of Outreach Services and Alliances, Room N3660, 200 Constitution Avenue, Washington, DC, 20210. Phone: 202-693-2573

Dates of collaboration: 2003 – ongoing

Goals or expectation of the collaboration at the outset: OSHA, NHCA (representing hearing health care, private practice, manufacturing, business, academia and government professionals), and NIOSH formed an alliance advance a culture of good hearing health by developing and disseminating recommendations and information that will improve HLPPs while sharing best practices and technical knowledge. Specific goals for the period 2006 – 2008 include:

Nature of the collaboration: A team made up of representatives of OSHA, NHCA, and NIOSH meets periodically. It will meet at the NHCA annual meeting each year to develop plans of action, craft or review products under development, and review progress. OSHA will encourage State Plan States’ and OSHA Consultation Projects’ participation on the team.

Accomplishments or products generated in this collaboration and/or ongoing activity, including equipment, technologies, publications, research results, etc:

United Brotherhood of Carpenters and Joiners of North America (UBC)

Point of contact: Arthur Galeae, Director, Joint Apprenticeship Training Center, Monroe, OH; Wm. Smith, Director, Joint Apprenticeship Training Center, Indianapolis, IN

Dates of the collaboration: 1997 – present

Goals or expectation of the collaboration at the outset: Investigate the risk for occupational hearing loss among carpenters and millwrights, and develop interventions specifically designed to prevent occupational hearing loss among these workers. The long term goal has been to develop hearing loss prevention tools that can be applied to other construction workers, as well as to workers in other industries.

Nature of the collaboration: The UBC/HLR program partnership secured access to carpenters and millwrights during apprentice training activities and at worksites to allow development of a hearing loss prevention program.

Accomplishments or products generated in this collaboration and/or ongoing activity, including equipment, technologies, publications, research results, etc.: The partnership developed a hearing loss prevention program that is a model for the construction industry. Preliminary results of a pilot study show the suitability of the trans-theoretical model to guide development of hearing loss prevention training programs. The pilot study also showed that a training program positively influenced attitudes and beliefs about preventing occupational hearing loss, and increased worker skills at fitting and using hearing protectors. The results of this pilot study were used by the HLR program to respond to the OSHA ANPR for a new hearing loss prevention standard for the construction industry. Preliminary results were also used by NIOSH in its response to the DOT ANPR for a new hearing loss prevention standard for railroad engineers.

Products include: (1) a training video designed to address barriers cited by construction workers for not wearing hearing protectors, (2) a training video designed to increase self-efficacy regarding hearing protector fit and use, (3) a multi-media CD designed to demonstrate the negative effects of tinnitus, and (4) a survey tool for assessing attitudes, beliefs, and behavioral intentions regarding hearing loss prevention.

Results of the pilot study have been presented at numerous scientific meetings, published in three journal articles, two brochures, three book chapters (one currently in press), and two proceedings. In 2006, a U.S. Navy shipyard will begin a field test of the HLR program training methods to evaluate whether or not the U.S. Navy will adopt these methodologies.

United States Navy

Point of contact: CDR Glen Rovig (Puget Sound Naval Shipyard); Thomas Hutchison (Portsmouth Naval Shipyard)

Dates of the collaboration: Proposed start in 2006

Nature of the collaboration: Supplement to previous NORA-funded projects

Goals or expectation of the collaboration at the outset: Develop new methods for implementing control technologies to reduce noise hazards. Develop new techniques for combining health communication theory with fit-test procedures to improve the effectiveness of hearing protectors. Reduce the rate of standard threshold shifts among Navy shipyard workers.

Accomplishments or products generated in this collaboration and/or ongoing activity, including equipment, technologies, publications, research results, etc.: Partnership is proposed.

University of Massachusetts Lowell- Department of Work Environment

Point of contact: Susan R. Woskie, Ph.D., CIH, Professor

Dates of the collaboration: 1999 – ongoing.

Nature of the collaboration: Consulting, memorandum of understanding (MOU), CRADA, joint research project, providing access to work places

Goals or expectation of the collaboration at the outset: Assist with research on two HLR program projects:

Accomplishments or products generated in this collaboration and/or ongoing activity, including equipment, technologies, publications, research results, etc.: Dr. Woskie reconstructed noise exposure history for workers at an Indianapolis auto manufacturing plant and advised on reconstruction of noise exposure history for workers at a Detroit auto manufacturing facility. She will be a co-author of a research paper on the methods and results of the noise exposure reconstruction.

Dr. Woskie was a collaborator for the design and development of the HLR program research protocol, “Noise Sampling Strategies and Exposure Response Models” and was integral in the development of the task-based sampling methodology and design of the field data collection strategy used for this study.

Dr. Woskie will be involved in the analysis of data collected during this study, particularly comparing task-based noise sampling approaches to dosimetry, and will be the lead or co-author on papers resulting from this analysis.

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Research Goal 2: Reduce Hearing Loss Through Interventions Targeting Personal Protective Equipment.

Acoustical Society of America Committee of Standards – American National Standards Institute

Point of Contact: Susan Blaeser, Manager of ASA Standards Secretariat, sblaeser@aip.org

Dates of the collaboration: 2000 – ongoing

Nature of the collaboration: NIOSH has been a voting member of ANSI since 2004 and has participated as chair or vice chair of Subcommittees on Bioacoustics (2000 – 2003) and Noise (2005).

Goals or expectation of the collaboration at the outset: Facilitate the development of US national standards on acoustics, vibration, bioacoustics and noise. To participate in the development of related ISO standards that affects U.S. interests.

Accomplishments or products generated in this collaboration and/or ongoing activity, including equipment, technologies, publications, research results, etc.: NIOSH HLR scientists have served as members of the S12 working group11 on hearing protector measurements and ratings since 1990 and have facilitated the development of the ANSI S12.6-1997 (R2002) standard and the latest draft standard for rating hearing protection devices S12.68-200X. HLR personnel have represented the U.S. at ISO meetings for development of HPD standards (TC43/SC1/WG17) and occupational noise exposure (TC43/SC1/WG53).

Aearo E•A•R Corp.

Point of contact: Elliott Berger, M.S. Senior Scientist, Zionsville IN; eberger@compuserve.com

Dates of the collaboration: 1989 – ongoing

Nature of the collaboration: Research on hearing protection measurements and evaluation

Goals or expectation of the collaboration at the outset: Develop more accurate methods to assess the performance of hearing protection devices and to develop national and international standards for measurement and rating of effectiveness.

Accomplishments or products generated in this collaboration and/or ongoing activity, including equipment, technologies, publications, research results, etc.: Three peer-reviewed publications (Royster et al. 1996; Berger et al. 1998; Murphy et al. 2004); Several joint publications derived from the interlaboratory study 1990-1992; ANSI Standard S12.6-1997; Proposed ANSI standard S12.68-200X for HPD ratings

General Motors Corporation (GMC)
Point of Contact:  Tai Chan, Head of Occupational Safety and  Health Dept. for General Motors; Tai.Chan@gm.com

Dates of the collaboration: October, 2003 – ongoing

Nature of the collaboration: Collaborative partner for hearing loss prevention research

Goals or expectation of the collaboration at the outset: 1) Determine safety and effectiveness of new technology HPDs. 2) Evaluate whether hearing impaired workers that require hearing aids can be adequately protected by passive or sound-restoration earmuffs such that their speech intelligibility reception is not degraded and such that they are not over exposed when wearing both hearing aids and protectors.

Accomplishments or products generated in this collaboration and/or ongoing activity, including equipment, technologies, publications, research results, etc.: 1) The data collection for the hearing protector study was completed in February 2005. The final report of the effectiveness and comfort of HPDs used at the Flint MFD facility is complete and undergoing internal peer-review. 2) OMB clearance for the hearing impaired study was received in November 2004. Data collection has commenced in July 2005 with training of the contractors for audiometric measurements. Subjects have been identified and are being tested.

Howard Leight Industries Division of Bacou-Dalloz Inc.

Point of contact: Brad Witt, Senior Audiologist, San Diego CA; bwitt@bacou-dalloz.com

Dates of the collaboration: 2000 – ongoing

Nature of the collaboration: Research on hearing protection measurements and evaluation, development of measurement software and hardware

Goals or expectation of the collaboration at the outset: Initially we entered into partnership to develop a software/hardware solution to conduct sound-field tests of hearing protection devices. We are presently pursuing a CRADA for a circumaural headphone that will provide acoustic isolation and have the capability to perform tests for audiometric evaluation and hearing protection devices. We are also collaborating in an interlaboratory study of six protectors.

Accomplishments or products generated in this collaboration and/or ongoing activity, including equipment, technologies, publications, research results, etc.: HPDLab Hearing Protector Testing software installed in four laboratories; Collaborative research and analysis has been included in international draft HPD standard 4869-7. On peer-reviewed conference proceedings paper ASA/Institute of Noise Control Engineering (INCE) 2005.

 

James Anderson Associates (JAA)

Point of contact:  Rick James and Robert Anderson, principal partners of JAA; RobertAnderson@jaa-hlp.com

Dates of the collaboration: 1995 – ongoing

Nature of the collaboration: Collaborative partner and consultant for hearing loss prevention research projects and development partner for HLPP tools.

Goals or expectation of the collaboration at the outset: 1) Improve hearing loss prevention practices through collaborative research on exposure monitoring and employee management. 2) Determine safety and effectiveness of new technology HPDs.

Accomplishments or products generated in this collaboration and/or ongoing activity, including equipment, technologies, publications, research results, etc.: 1) HearSaf 2000TM was developed as a joint effort between NIOSH, JAA and Hawkwa Group for use in managing occupational hearing loss prevention, tracking worker noise exposures and assigning risk estimates. HearSaf 2000TM was completed in 2000. It is currently marketed as HearSaf Suite for Windows and is available through Hawkwa Group and is estimated to track 4 million workers in the U.S. 2) The data collection for the hearing protector study was completed in February 2005. The final report of the effectiveness and comfort of HPDs used at the Flint MFD facility is complete and undergoing internal peer-review. JAA personnel were instrumental in facilitating the data collection and acting as the intermediary between NIOSH, General Motors Corporation and the UAW.

International Union, United Automobile, Aerospace, and Agricultural Implement Workers of America (UAW)

Point of contact:  Mike White, Health and Safety Representative; Mike.White@uaw-gm.org

Dates of the collaboration: October, 2003 – ongoing

Nature of the collaboration: Collaborative partner for Hearing loss prevention research

Goals or expectation of the collaboration at the outset: 1) Determine safety and effectiveness of new technology HPDs. 2) Evaluate whether hearing impaired workers that require hearing aids can be adequately protected by passive or sound-restoration earmuffs such that their speech intelligibility reception is not degraded and such that they are not over exposed when wearing both hearing aids and protectors.

Accomplishments or products generated in this collaboration and/or ongoing activity, including equipment, technologies, publications, research results, etc.: 1) The data collection for the hearing protector study was completed in February 2005. The final report of the effectiveness and comfort of HPDs used at the Flint MFD facility is complete and undergoing internal peer-review. 2) OMB clearance for the hearing impaired study was received in November 2004. Data collection has commenced in July

United States Air Force: Wright Patterson Air Force Base

Point of Contact: Richard McKinley; richard.mckinley@wpafb.af.mil

Dates of the Collaboration: 1989 – ongoing

Nature of the collaboration: Research on hearing protection measurements and evaluation

Goals or expectation of the collaboration at the outset: Develop more accurate methods to assess the performance of hearing protection devices and to develop national and international standards for measurement and rating of effectiveness.

Accomplishments or products generated in this collaboration and/or ongoing activity, including equipment, technologies, publications, research results, etc.: Three peer-reviewed publications (Royster et al. 1996; Berger et al. 1998; Murphy et al. 2004); ANSI Standard S12.6-1997; Proposed ANSI standard S12.68-200X for HPD ratings.

United States Army Aberdeen Proving Ground

Point of contact: Joel Kalb; jkalb@arl.army.mil

Dates of the collaboration: 1997 – ongoing

Nature of the collaboration: Research on impact/impulse noise and risk of hearing loss

Goals or expectation of the collaboration at the outset: Develop accurate methods to evaluate impulsive noise for the purpose of assessing the risk of hearing loss due to exposure.

Accomplishments or products generated in this collaboration and/or ongoing activity, including equipment, technologies, publications, research results, etc.: Several presentations at national and international meetings have resulted from NIOSH analysis of impulsive waveforms using the U.S. Army Auditory Hazard Assessment Algorithm for Humans (AHAAH) cochlear model for risk of hearing loss. This model has been incorporated into an analysis tool by NIOSH researchers to facilitate analysis (Conference proceedings: Yan et al. 2004). The software is the basis for a CRADA developed with Larson-Davis, Inc.

United States Army Aeromedical Research Laboratory: Ft. Rucker

Point of Contact: William Ahroon; william.ahroon@amedd.army.mil

Dates of the Collaboration: 2003 – ongoing

Nature of the collaboration: Research on hearing protection measurements and evaluation

Goals or expectation of the collaboration at the outset: Develop more accurate methods to assess the performance of hearing protection devices and to develop national and international standards for measurement and rating of effectiveness.

Accomplishments or products generated in this collaboration and/or ongoing activity, including equipment, technologies, publications, research results, etc.: Proposed ANSI standard S12.68-200X for HPD ratings; USAARL has installed the NIOSH HPDLab software and is participating in the current interlaboratory study of HPD attenuation.

University of Cincinnati, School of Engineering

Point of contact: Jay Kim, PhD, Professor

Dates of the collaboration: August 2004 – ongoing

Nature of the collaboration: Joint research

Goals or expectation of the collaboration at the outset:

Accomplishments or products generated in this collaboration and/or ongoing activity, including equipment, technologies, publications, research results, etc. A proof-of-concept multi-station fit-testing system has been developed permitting up to eight subjects to be tested. The testing interface is currently being completed and is expected to be finished in early 2006.

Impulse waveforms have been provided to Dr. Kim. The preliminary analysis has demonstrated peak levels comparable to those measured in the time-history data. A research effort on the investigation of impulse waveforms generated by a shock wave is being planned for 2006 and 2007.

University of Florinopolis, Brazil

Point of contact: Samir N.Y. Gerges; samir@emc.ufsc.br

Dates of the collaboration: 2004 – ongoing

Nature of the collaboration: Research on hearing protection measurements and evaluation

Goals or expectation of the collaboration at the outset: Develop more accurate methods to assess the performance of hearing protection devices and to develop national and international standards for measurement and rating of effectiveness.

Accomplishments or products generated in this collaboration and/or ongoing activity, including equipment, technologies, publications, research results, etc.: Dr. Gerges’ laboratory is the only international lab participating in the current interlaboratory study of HPD attenuation.

University of Pittsburgh

Point of contact: Jeff Vipperman, Ph.D. Dept. of Mechanical Engineering; jsv@pitt.edu

Dates of the collaboration: 2003 – ongoing

Nature of the collaboration: Evaluation of the hazards associated with continuous versus impulsive noise

Goals or expectation of the collaboration at the outset: Develop accurate methods to evaluate impulsive noise for the purpose of assessing the risk of hearing loss due to exposure. Evaluate an extensive collection of digitized waveforms using the U.S. Army AHAAH model for both protected and unprotected conditions.

Accomplishments or products generated in this collaboration and/or ongoing activity, including equipment, technologies, publications, research results, etc.: The collaboration has produced digital filter models of six hearing protection devices based on subject-fit attenuation data and is in the process of completing the analysis using the AHAAH model.

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Research Goal 3: Develop Engineering Controls to Reduce Noise Exposures

Michigan Tech University

Point of Contact: Mohan D. Rao, Ph.D, Professor

Dates of the collaboration:December 2001 – ongoing

Nature of the collaboration: Joint research

Goals or expectation of the collaboration at the outset: Investigate and identify noise sources on air compressors, grinders, circular saws, table saws, nail guns, shop vacs, impact wrenches, and jigsaws.Make recommendations to reduce noise emissions from those tools.

Accomplishments or products generated in this collaboration and/or ongoing activity, including equipment, technologies, publications, research results, etc.: This work was accomplished by engineering students being led by this professor as part of their academic study. More detail on this partnership may be found at:
http://www.cdc.gov/niosh/topics/noise/collegeStudents/studentpresentations.html

Purdue University

Point of Contact: Luc Mongeau, M.S., Ph.D, Professor

Dates of the collaboration: December 2001 – ongoing

Nature of the collaboration: Joint agreement

Goals or expectation of the collaboration at the outset: Investigate and identify noise sources on air compressors, grinders, circular saws, table saws, nail guns, shop vacs, impact wrenches, and jigsaws. Make recommendations to reduce noise emissions from those tools.

Accomplishments or products generated in this collaboration and/or ongoing activity, including equipment, technologies, publications, research results, etc.: This work was accomplished by engineering students being led by the above professor as part of their academic study. http://www.cdc.gov/niosh/topics/noise/collegeStudents/studentpresentations.html

United Mine Workers of America (UMWA), Bituminous Coal Operators’ Association (BCOA), MSHA, National Mining Association (NMA), Consol Energy Inc. Peabody Energy, Joy Mining Machinery, J. H. Fletcher and Co., and Kennametal Inc. (“The Noise partnership”)

Point of Contact: Joe Lamonica, BCOA, 803-644-8967; Dennis O’Dell, UMWA, 703-208-7120; Bruce Watzman, NMA, 202-463-2657

Dates of the collaboration: 1999 – ongoing

Nature of the collaboration: MOU

Goals or expectation of the collaboration at the outset: Work as a team to reduce exposure to noise and prevent NIHL among miners. Research on quieting various pieces of mining equipment such as continuous mining machines, roof bolters, and vibrating screens in coal preparation plants was divided up among different mining companies and different equipment manufacturers with NIOSH acting as the technical arm of the partnership. NIOSH developed the test plans, and conducted the evaluations of the various controls developed and tested. For example, for the continuous miner engineering noise control work, Joy Mining Machinery, C.U.E. Inc., Consol Energy Inc., and NIOSH worked together to develop a quieter coated flight bar design. C.U.E. Inc. developed the coated flight bars, Joy installed them on their continuous mining machine, Consol Energy Inc. provided the test mine, and NIOSH planned and conducted the testing of the design in both laboratory and in-mine tests. Both MSHA and UMWA supported the testing by providing input and participating in the in-mine testing.

Accomplishments or products generated in this collaboration and/or ongoing activity, including equipment, technologies, publications, research results, etc.: Because of the noise partnership, the HLR program developed several noise controls. The coated flight bar chain conveyor and the mist system for roof bolting machines are currently being manufactured and sold by Joy Mining Machinery, a noise partnership member. MSHA, a noise partnership member, has cited these noise controls as “promising” noise controls in the MSHA Program Information Bulletin P04-18, “Technologically Achievable, Administratively Achievable, and Promising Noise Controls (30 CFR Part 62)”. Also, the HLR program is conducting case studies with mining companies the noise partnership has provided to assist in underground testing.

NIOSH has been invited to individual companies (e.g. Conn-Weld–-a vibrating screen manufacturer) as well as other health and safety trade groups as a result of contacts made through this noise partnership. NIOSH is working with mining companies and vibrating screen manufacturers to evaluate various controls for reducing noise related to vibrating screens.

Invitations for technology transfer efforts, such as workshops, conference presentations, and journal articles have been issued to the HLR program as a result of this partnership. In 2005, NIOSH hosted a Mining Hearing Loss Prevention Workshop in Charleston, WV with the BCOA, MSHA, NMA, and UMWA. Because this joint workshop effort was successful in the coal industry, another workshop was requested by the metal/nonmetal mining industry for April of 2006.

National Ground Water Association (NGWA), Ohio Water Well Drillers Association, Georgia Well Drillers Association, Minnesota Well Drillers Association, Louisiana Well Drillers Association, Florida Well Drillers Association, Empire State Ground Water Association, Pennsylvania Water Well Association, Schramm, Inc., SJL Drill Services, Inc., Mantyla Well Drilling, Bergerson Caswell Drilling, Renner and Sons Drilling, Yost Drilling, Frontz Drilling, Caster Well Drilling, Inc., Howard Concrete Pumping, Inc. National Drillers Associations, Southwest Mississippi Community College, The Hartford Insurance Company, Atlas Copco Company, Al Hamilton Contracting Company, T & T Fuels, Inc./Debra Lynn Coals, Inc., SENEX Explosives, Inc.

Point of Contact: Kathy Butcher, NGWA – 1-800-551-7379

Dates of the collaboration: 1996 – ongoing

Nature of the collaboration: Consulting, joint research project, providing access to work places, equipment, and personnel, venues for communication.

Goals or expectation of the collaboration at the outset: Work with the drilling industry to reduce exposure to noise and prevent NIHL among surface drillers. Develop engineering controls for air rotary surface drill rigs used in the mining and construction industries. Confirm that drillers have occupational hearing loss and identify which universally used drill rig type are the most hazardous to workers. Develop noise controls to be field tested in production drilling environments.

Accomplishments or products generated in this collaboration and/or ongoing activity, including equipment, technologies, publications, research results, etc.: Because of the group collaboration, the HLR program has developed several noise controls. Controls have been developed to help protect operators on cab and non-cab air rotary rigs. One uses a commercially available hydraulic muffler to reduce structural noise vibration of the control panel in cab mounted rigs. The other control is referred to as the “partial-cab.” The partial-cab protects operators from noise levels on drill rigs without cabs. Both of these controls reduce the average noise exposure that operators experience during an eight-hour shift.

The NGWA and its associates have played an active role with the HLR program in the technology transfer effort. Knowledge gained from this project has and will continue to be communicated to the construction and mining industries and research institutions through partnership councils, research journals, industry-centered publications, seminars, and conferences.

The Pennsylvania State University

Point of Contact: Courtney B. Burroughs, Ph.D., 814 237-7453

Dates of the collaboration: 2000 – 2004

Nature of the collaboration: Joint research

Goals or expectation of the collaboration at the outset: The development of noise treatments for a dust collector fan, which is a vane axial fan located inside the continuous mining machine.

Accomplishments or products generated in this collaboration and/or ongoing activity, including equipment, technologies, publications, research results, etc.: This work was accomplished by an engineering student being led by the above professor as part of his academic study. The noise treatments developed as noise controls were 1) Moving the turning vanes downstream, 2) Changing the shape of the leading edges of the turning vanes from straight and radial, 3) Extending the perforations and outside adsorptive layer to cover the entire fan housing, 4) Adding an extension with an absorptive layer on the onside to the fan discharge, and 5) Replacing the rotor with unevenly spaced blades with a rotor with evenly spaced blades. The effects of the engineering controls are expected to begin in 2006, when underground test results are finalized and published.

University of Cincinnati, School of Engineering

Point of contact: Jay Kim, Ph.D, Professor

Dates of the collaboration: December 2000 – ongoing

Nature of the collaboration: Joint research

Goals or expectation of the collaboration at the outset: Provide access for HLR staff to the University of Cincinnati’s Structural Dynamics Research Lab, including the acoustics lab.

Assist HLR program in the development of data acquisition hardware/software systems and in sound power level data gathering and analysis for powered hand tools used in the construction industry.

Investigate and identify noise sources on air compressors, grinders, circular saws, table saws, nail guns, shop vacs, impact wrenches and jigsaws. Make recommendations to reduce noise emissions from those tools.

Accomplishments or products generated in this collaboration and/or ongoing activity, including equipment, technologies, publications, research results, etc. The data was used to populate this searchable website database: http://www.cdc.gov/niosh/topics/noise/workplacesolutions/toolsDatabase.html (Link updated 12/16/2009 - http://wwwn.cdc.gov/niosh-sound-vibration/

The tool measurement and engineered noise reduction solutions work was accomplished by engineering students being led by the above professor as part of their academic study. The presentations detailing all student projects are located at the below website: http://www.cdc.gov/niosh/topics/noise/collegeStudents/studentpresentations.html

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Research Goal 4: Improve understanding of occupational hearing loss through surveillance and investigation of risk factors

Case Western Reserve School of Medicine, Department of Otolaryngology-HNS

Point of contact: Kumar Alagramam, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Otolaryngology

Dates of the collaboration: 2002 – present

Nature of the collaboration: Research projects

Goals or expectation of the collaboration at the outset: Conduct research on the genetic basis of noise induced hearing loss. Also serve together on a conference planning committee.

Accomplishments or products generated in this collaboration and/or ongoing activity, including equipment, technologies, publications, research results, etc.: Served with HLR program staff on planning committee for conference: " The Mouse as an Instrument for Hearing Research," Bar Harbor, Maine, 2003. Also two published papers as follows:

Pagedar NA, Wang W, Davis RR, Wright CG, Alagramam KN. Gene expression analysis of specific cell types isolated from mouse inner ear using laser capture microdissection. (In preparation).

Washington JL, Wright CG, Erway LC, Davis RR, Alagramam K [2005]. Characterization of a new allele of Ames waltzer generated by ENU mutagenesis.  Hearing Research, 202, 161-69.

FUNDACENTRO (Brazilian Institute for Occupational Safety and Health)

Point of contact: Evelyn Albizu

Dates of the collaboration: March 2004 – present

Nature of the collaboration: Consulting

Goals or expectation of the collaboration at the outset: Determine worker exposure to noise in fishing boats and evaluate effects on hearing. This is an underserved population with regard to hearing loss prevention. Currently only a few publications exist on the noise exposure in this industry sector.

Accomplishments or products generated in this collaboration and/or ongoing activity, including equipment, technologies, publications, research results, etc.: Publications are being prepared.

Larson-Davis

Point of contact: Rob Brauch, Director, Sales and Marketing

Dates of the collaboration: 4/18/05 to approximately 2008

Nature of the collaboration: CRADA

Goals or expectation of the collaboration at the outset: Integrate an impulsive noise measurement system into a handheld dosimeter

Accomplishments or products generated in this collaboration and/or ongoing activity, including equipment, technologies, publications, research results, etc.: None to date

Korean Occupational Safety and Health Agency

Point of contact: Yeon Soon Ahn, MD, Ph.D, Scientist

Dates of the collaboration: April 2004 – present

Nature of the collaboration: Consulting, MOU, CRADA, joint research project, provides access to databases.

Goals or expectation of the collaboration at the outset: To determine the auditory effects of combined exposure to carbon monoxide and noise among workers from steel and iron companies.

Accomplishments or products generated in this collaboration and/or ongoing activity, including equipment, technologies, publications, research results, etc.: Publications are being prepared.

National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS)

Point of contact: Charles Dillon, MD

Dates of the collaboration: 1997 – present

Nature of the collaboration: MOU regarding research collaboration

Goals or expectation of the collaboration at the outset: Audiometric testing on a nationally-representative sample of US adults through the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) program. NCHS provides the vehicle for the survey, and the HLR program provides technical expertise including assistance with questionnaire and protocol development, maintenance and calibration of equipment, technician training, and quality assurance activities.

Accomplishments or products generated in this collaboration and/or ongoing activity, including equipment, technologies, publications, research results, etc.: Data collection for the first survey period (1999–2004) completed. Several presentations have been made at professional conferences and publications are being prepared. The data are being used as a reference population for other HLR program activities. Collaboration is continuing for the next survey cycle.

Graydon PS, Stephenson MR, Themann CL [2005].  Apprentice carpenter hearing levels from 1995 to 2003.  Poster presentation at the 30th annual NHCA conference, Tucson, Arizona.

Hoffman HJ, Themann CL [2005].  Hearing examination in adults (20 to 69 years old) in NHANES, 1999-2004.  Presentation at the 30th annual NHCA conference, Tucson, Arizona.

Hoffman H & Themann C [2001].  Hearing loss in adults and children: An epidemiologist’s view.  Presentation at the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association conference, New Orleans, Louisiana.

Murphy WJ, Themann CL, Franks JR [2005].  Hearing levels in U.S. adults aged 20-69 years: NHANES 1999-2002. Abstract in Journal of the Acoustical Society of America, 117:2395.

Themann CL [2000].  A preview of audiometric testing in the current NHANES.  Poster presentation at the National Hearing Conservation Association conference, Denver, Colorado

Themann CL, Hoffman HJ, Dillon CF, Franks JR [2004].  Hearing Ability in the US: NHANES 1999-2004.  Presentation at the XXVII International Congress of Audiology, Phoenix, Arizona.

Themann CL [2003].  Preventing hearing loss among migrant farm workers.  Presentation at the Midwest Farmworkers’ Stream Forum, Houston, Texas.

Icelandic Heart Association Research Institute/National Institute on Aging

Points of contact:   Gudny Eiriksdottir (Icelandic Heart Association); Tamara Harris, MD, MS (National Institute on Aging); and Lenore Launer, PhD (National Institute on Aging)

Dates of the collaboration:  2001 – present

Goals or expectation of the collaboration at the outset: Audiometric testing of approximately 10,000 individuals in the Reykjavik Study cohort. The study is managed by the Icelandic Heart Association Research Institute. The current phase of the study, called the Age, Gene/Environment Susceptibility Study (AGES), is funded by the National Institute on Aging. The HLR program provides technical assistance with the audiometric aspects of this project, including questionnaire and protocol development, training of the examiners, and quality assurance review of the data collected. The HLR program will also assist with data analysis and dissemination of results.

Nature of the collaboration: Research collaboration

Accomplishments or products generated in this collaboration and/or ongoing activity, including equipment, technologies, publications, research results, etc.:  Data collection began in 2003 and will continue through 2006.  No results are available at this time.

National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders (NIDCD)

Point of Contact: Howard Hoffman,

Dates of the collaboration: 1997 – present

Goals or expectation of the collaboration at the outset: Incorporation of audiometric testing in the NHANES program and collaboration on public health measures oriented towards hearing loss prevention such as the Wise Ears campaign and Healthy People 2000 goals.

Nature of the collaboration: Joint efforts on research and intervention

Accomplishments or products generated in this collaboration and/or ongoing activity, including equipment, technologies, publications, research results, etc.:  The HLR program and NIDCD, joined by a coalition of national, regional, and local organizations, voluntaries, and state and local government agencies, formulated a national campaign to prevent noise-induced hearing loss called WISE EARS!®

NIDCD works collaboratively with the HLR program on audiometric testing in NHANES and the Iceland AGES study.  Collaboration has expanded to include audiometric testing in the Hispanic Community Health Study being funded by the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute.

NoiseChem Research Group

Point of contact: Deepak Prasher, PhD, University College, London, UK.

Dates of the collaboration: March 2001 – ongoing.

Nature of the collaboration: Joint research, consultation, and data analysis

Goals or expectation of the collaboration at the outset: Partners include: French National Safety Institute for the Prevention of Occupational Accidents and Diseases, the Finnish National Institute of Occupational Health, the Danish National Institute of Occupational Health, the Swedish National Institute for Working Life, the Polish Nofer Institute of Occupational Medicine and the Polish Institute of Occupational Medicine and Environmental Health. Some of the partners from NoiseChem have examined the effects of styrene on the human auditory system through epidemiological investigations using standardized procedures. They agreed to provide their questionnaire, exposure and audiometric data to the HLR program so that a meta-analysis of the data can be performed.

Accomplishments or products generated in this collaboration and/or ongoing activity, including equipment, technologies, publications, research results, etc.: Joint publications in peer reviewed journal, organization of conferences, input in the new European Noise Directive 2003/10/EC http://europa.eu.int/eur-lex/pri/en/oj/dat/2003/l_042/l_04220030215en00380044.pdf

Selected Publications:

Morata TC, Campo P [2002]. Ototoxic effects of styrene alone or in concert with other agents: A review. Noise and Health, Jan - Mar 2002, vol. 4, no. 14, pp. 15-24(10).

Morata TC, Johnson AC, Nylen P,  Svensson EB, Cheng J, Krieg EK, Lindblad AC, Ernstgård L, Franks J [2002]. Audiometric findings in workers exposed to low levels of  styrene and noise. Journal of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, September, 44 (9): 806-814, 2002.

Prasher D, Morata TC, Campo P, Fechter L, Johnson AC, Lund SP, Pawlas K, Starck J, Sliwinska Kowalska M, Sulkowski W [2002]. NoiseChem: A European commission research project on the effects of exposure to noise and industrial chemicals on hearing and balance. Noise and Health, Jan - Mar 2002, vol. 4, no. 14, pp. 41-48(8).

Sheet Metal Occupational Health Institute Trust (SMOHIT)

Point of contact: Gary Batykefer SMOHIT Administrator http://www.smohit.org/

Dates of the collaboration: 1994 – 1996

Goals or expectation of the collaboration at the outset: Determine if sheet metal workers are at risk for occupational hearing loss.

Nature of the collaboration: This is a joint labor-management organization that serves about 130,000 workers. Together we assessed hearing levels of sheet metal workers and identified the degree of occupational hearing loss as a function of years of exposure. We then conducted an exposure assessment that was one of the first applications of T-BEAM for noise hazards.

Accomplishments or products generated in this collaboration and/or ongoing activity, including equipment, technologies, publications, research results, etc.: The results were presented to the national management of SMOHIT and the Sheet Metal Workers International Association. As a result, SMOHIT developed training materials to train sheet metal workers about hearing hazards. This effort also validated the audiometric test methodology and T-BEAM methods that were subsequently used in the large-scale follow-on efforts with carpenters.

Universidade Tuiuti do Parana

Point of contact: Lilian Jacob, Ph.D, Professor

Dates of the collaboration: 1999 – present

Nature of the collaboration: Consulting, joint research project, providing access to work places, consultation on strategic plan and graduate research program initiatives

Goals or expectation of the collaboration at the outset, e.g. to determine worker exposure in a particular industry or trade, or to conduct a specific study, or to develop a specific intervention (e.g. an engineering control), etc.: Conduct studies on occupational hearing loss among different economic sectors; create audiometric database

Accomplishments or products generated in this collaboration and/or ongoing activity, including equipment, technologies, publications, research results, etc.:

Selected Publications:
Cavalli RCM, Morata TC, Marques J M [2004]. Audit of Hearing Loss Prevention Programs in Curitiba. Revista Brasileira de Otorrinolaringologia 70 ( 3): 368-377.

Jacob L, Alvarenga K, Morata, T [2002]. The effects of occupational exposure to lead on the auditory system: a review of the literature (in Portuguese). Revista Brasileira de Otorrinolaringologia 68(4): 564-9.

Lacerda A, Leroux T, Morata TC. Ototoxic effects of the simultaneous exposure to noise and carbon monoxide: A review (in Portuguese). In press.

Manjabosco CW, Morata TC, Marques J [2004]. Audiometric findings of agricultural workers (in Portuguese). Arquivos de Otorrinolaringologia 8(4):285-295.

University of Cincinnati, Department of Biological Sciences

Point of contact: Larry Erway, Ph.D, Professor

Dates of the collaboration: 1994 – ongoing

Nature of the collaboration: Joint research projects

Goals or expectation of the collaboration at the outset: Conduct studies on the genetic basis of susceptibility to noise and the role of free radical scavengers.

Accomplishments or products generated in this collaboration and/or ongoing activity, including equipment, technologies, publications, research results, etc.

Selected Publications:

Davis RR, Cheever ML, Krieg EF, Erway LC [1999]. Quantitative measure of genetic susceptibility to noise-induced hearing loss in two strains of mice.  Hearing Research, 134:9-15. Impact: Cited 6 times.

Davis RR, Newlander JK, Ling X-B, Cortopassi G, Krieg EF, Erway LC [2001]. Genetic basis for susceptibility to noise-induced hearing loss in mice. Hearing Research 155: 82-90. Impact: Cited 17 times.

Wright State University School of Medicine (WSU) – Lifespan Health Research Center

Point of contact: Cameron Chumlea, Ph.D, Fels Professor

Dates of the collaboration: 2003 – ongoing

Goals or expectation of the collaboration at the outset: Establish an audiometric test facility that enables WSU researchers to conduct follow-up audiometric tests on a longitudinal study population.

Nature of the collaboration: Joint research

Accomplishments or products generated in this collaboration and/or ongoing activity, including equipment, technologies, publications, research results, etc.: The audiology facility was established with funding from the HLR program. Program personnel trained WSU staff to collect audiometric, tympanometric, personal history, and otoscopic data. Data collection is now underway on subjects who were initially tested when they were adolescents. Initial success of this effort prompted WSU to plan to expand this effort, and specifically to investigate the genetics of noise-induced hearing loss. An NIH grant proposal is in preparation and HLR program staff will serve as technical consultants if it is funded.

Yale Occupational and Environmental Medicine Program, Yale University

Point of contact: Peter Rabinowitz, MPH, MD, Associate Professor of Medicine, Director of Clinical Services

Dates of the collaboration: June 2003 – ongoing

Nature of the collaboration: MOU

Goals or expectation of the collaboration at the outset: Complete an assessment of an audiological test battery for detecting the auditory effects of chemicals in exposed workers.

Accomplishments or products generated in this collaboration and/or ongoing activity, including equipment, technologies, publications, research results, etc.: None yet. Publications are planned.

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National Hearing Conservation Association (NHCA)

Points of contact:   Executive Officer: Karen Wojdyla info@hearingconservation.org and President-Elect: John G Casali jcasali@vt.edu

Dates of the collaboration: 1989 – present

Nature of the collaboration: The HLR program has worked with NHCA as both a collaborator and as a contractor. HLR program researchers have served the association through positions on the executive council, providing workshops during the annual conference and by actively contributing to the scientific mission of NHCA. The HLR program has used NHCA as a contractor to organize several “Best Practices” conferences (e.g. Ototoxic Chemicals and Noise; Impulse Noise) and most recently organized our HLR program Futures conference in April 2005.

Goals or expectation of the collaboration at the outset: Expedite research progress and maximize information dissemination through interaction with other hearing health professionals.

Accomplishments or products generated in this collaboration and/or ongoing activity, including equipment, technologies, publications, research results, etc.: The ANSI S12 WG11 holds it annual working group meeting following the NHCA conferences and thus provides a unique opportunity to interact with hearing health professionals, from industry, government and academia to plan research efforts. From these efforts, the interlaboratory studies in 1990 and 1992 were completed (Royster et al., 1996; Berger et al., 1998; Murphy et al., 2004). NIOSH and collaborators from NHCA are currently investigating the ANSI S12.6-1997 Method A & B comparison.

Selected publications:

Kardous CA, Franks JR, Davis RR. [2005]. NIOSH/NHCA Best-Practices Workshop on impulsive noise. Noise Control Eng. J. 53 (2): 53-60.

Morata TC [2003].Chemical exposure as a risk factor for hearing loss. The Journal of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, July,

Proceedings of the 1989 Hearing Conservation Conference in Lexington, KY[1].

Proceedings of the 1992 Hearing Conservation Conference in Cincinnati, OH.1



[1] NIOSH sponsored these conferences, NHCA published the proceedings