Skip directly to local search Skip directly to A to Z list Skip directly to navigation Skip directly to site content Skip directly to page options
CDC Home

Statistics: All Mining

Introduction

The following maps and graphs represent data for All Mining. The information is organized by Mines, Employees, Fatalities and Injuries. The Mines section contains information on the number and location of the mining operations. The Employees section details the number of employees and the number of employee hours. The Fatalities section describes the number and rate of fatalities, the number and rate by work locations and the number of fatalities by accident class. The Injuries section presents the number and rate of nonfatal lost-time injuries, the number and rate by work locations and the number of injuries by accident class.

Mines

Locations of Mining Operations by Commodity, 2010Locations of Mining Operations by Commodity, 2010: This United States map displays symbols, by county, representing the locations of active mining operations by commodity for 2010. Active mines are mining operations that reported employment during the year. In 2010, there were 1,945 coal mines, 296 metal mines, 654 nonmetal mines, 4,525 stone mines, and 6,863 sand & gravel mines. Mines at which only contractors were working did not show any employment and are not displayed. 

Number of Mines by Commodities, 2001-2010Number of Mines by Commodities, 2001-2010: This graph displays the number of active mines by commodities for a 10-year period from 2001 through 2010. Active mines are those mines that reported any employee hours during the year. For most of the commodities, except for metal and stone, there has been a decrease in the number of mines over the years. For coal, the number of mines in 2001 was 2,144 and decreased to 1,945 for 2010. Metal mines had a mine count of 281 for 2001 and increased to 296 in 2010. There were 785 nonmetal mines in 2001 and 654 mines in 2010. Stone mines had 4,282 mines in 2001 and  increased to 4,525 mines in 2010. In 2001, there were 7,131 Sand and Gravel mines and 6,863 mines in 2010. Overall there were 14,623 mines in 2001 and 14,283 mines in 2010.

Locations of Underground Mines, 2010Locations of Underground Mines, 2010: This United States map displays symbols, by county, representing the locations of active underground mining operations for 2010. Active mines are mining operations that reported employment during the year. In 2010, there were 819 underground mines. Mines at which only contractors were working did not show any employment and are not displayed.

Locations of Surface Mines, 2010Locations of Surface Mines, 2010: This United States map displays symbols, by county, representing the locations of active surface mining operations for 2010. Active mines are mining operations that reported employment during the year. In 2010, there were 13,464 surface mines. Mines at which only contractors were working did not show any employment and are not displayed.

Employees

Locations and Density Map of Mine Operator Employees, 2010Locations and Density Map of Mine Operator Employees, 2010: This density map of the United States displays, by county, the locations and density of the 249,355 mine operator employees in 2010. Colored symbols represent densities of less than 25 employees, 25 to 49 employees, 50 to 199 employees, 200 to 499 employees, and 500 or more employees.


Employee Hours by Mining Sector, 2001-2010Employee Hours by Mining Sector, 2001-2010: This graph displays the number of employee hours by mining sector over a 10-year period from 2001 through 2010. From 2001 to 2010, coal operator employee hours increased by 30.8 million, metal operator employee hours increased by 6.0 million, nonmetal operator employee hours decreased by 9.0 million, stone operator employee hours decreased by 40.1 million, sand & gravel employee hours decreased by 23.5 million, coal contractor employee hours increased by 10.4 million, and noncoal contractor employee hours increased by 11.6 million.

Mine Operator Employees by Commodity, 2010Mine Operator Employees by Commodity, 2010: This pie chart represents the number and percentages of mine operator employees in 2010 by commodity. Coal had 89,209 employees (35.8 percent), metal had 35,903 employees (14.4 percent), nonmetal had 20,638 employees (8.3 percent), stone had 67,612 employees (27.1 percent), and sand and gravel had 35,993 employees (14.4 percent).

Locations and Density Map of Underground Mine Operator Employees, 2010Locations and Density Map of Underground Mine Operator Employees, 2010: This United States map displays symbols, by county, representing the locations of 50,788 mine operator employees in underground work locations for 2010. Colored symbols represent densities of less than 25 employees, 25 to 49 employees, 50 to 199 employees, 200 to 499 employees, and 500 or more employees.

Underground Employee Hours by Commodity, 2001-2010Underground Employee Hours by Commodity, 2001-2010: This graph displays the number of underground employee hours reported by mine operators and independent contractors by commodity for 2001 to 2010. There were 74.6 million employee hours for coal operators in 2001 and 94.8 million employee hours in 2010. Metal operators had 8.9 million employee hours in 2001 and 10.6 million employee hours in 2010. Nonmetal operators had 5.2 million employee hours in 2001 and 5.1 million employee hours in 2010. Stone operators had 3.9 million employee hours in 2001 and 3.7 million employee hours in 2010. Coal contractors had 5.3 million employee hours in 2001 and 7.2 million employee hours in 2010. Noncoal contractors had 2.5 million employee hours in 2001 and 3.2 million employee hours in 2010.

Locations and Density Map of Surface Mine Operator Employees, 2010Locations and Density Map of Surface Mine Operator Employees, 2010: This United States map displays symbols, by county, representing the locations of 198,567 mine operator employees in surface work locations for 2010. Colored symbols represent densities of less than 25 employees, 25 to 49 employees, 50 to 199 employees, 200 to 499 employees, and 500 or more employees.

Surface Employee Hours by Commodity, 2001-2010Surface Employee Hours by Commodity, 2001-2010: This graph displays the number of surface employee hours reported by mine operators and independent contractors by commodity from 2001 to 2010. Coal operators had 93.9 million employee hours in 2001 and 104.4 million employee hours in 2010. Metal operators had 59.9 million employee hours in 2001 and 64.3 million employee hours in 2010. Nonmetal operators had 45.4 million employee hours in 2001 and 36.5 million employee hours in 2010. Stone operators had 162.2 million employee hours in 2001 and 122.4 million employee hours in 2010. Sand and gravel operators had 77 million employee hours in 2001 and 53.5 million employee hours in 2010. Coal contractors had 47.4 million employee hours in 2001 and 58.2 million employee hours in 2010.

Fatalities

Mining Fatalities, 2001-2010Mining Fatalities, 2001-2010: This chart displays the number and rate of occupational mining fatalities, excluding office employees, from 2001 through 2010. Full-time equivalent (FTE) employees equal 2,000 hours worked per year. There were 72 fatalities in 2001 with a fatality rate of 25.6 per 100,000 FTEs. In 2010, there were 70 fatalities with a fatality rate of 25.4 per 100,000 FTEs.


Mining Fatalities by Operator and Independent Contractor, 2001-2010Mining Fatalities by Operator and Independent Contractor, 2001-2010
: This chart displays the number and rate of occupational mining fatalities, excluding office employees, by operators and independent contractors from 2001 to 2010. Full-time equivalent (FTE) employees are based on 2,000 employee hours worked per year. In 2001, there were 56 operator fatalities for a fatality rate of 23.4 per 100,000 FTEs and 16 contractor fatalities with a fatality rate of 38.2 per 100,000 FTEs. For 2010, there were 57 occupational operator fatalities with a fatality rate of 25.5 per 100,000 FTEs and 13 contractor fatalities with a fatality rate of 24.7 per 100,000 FTEs.

Mining Fatalities by Commodity, 1911-2010Mining Fatalities by Commodity, 1911-2010: This chart displays the number of fatalities and fatality rates in 5-year aggregates in the mining industry by coal and noncoal from 1911 to 2010, excluding office employees. Noncoal includes metal, nonmetal, stone, and sand and gravel operations. Sand and gravel miners were included starting in 1958. Full-time equivalent (FTE) employees are based on 2,000 employee hours worked per year. The fatality rate is based on 100,000 full time equivalent employees. The coal fatality rate shows a rapid decline in fatalities after the passage of the Federal Coal Mine Health and Safety Act of 1969.  The Federal Mine Safety and Health Act of 1977 consolidated federal mine regulations for coal and metal/nonmetal under MSHA. The Mine Improvement and New Emergency Response Act of 2006 (MINER Act) amended the Federal Mine Safety and Health Act of 1977.

Mining Fatalities, Underground, 2001-2010Mining Fatalities, Underground, 2001-2010: This chart displays the number and rate of occupational mining fatalities, excluding office employees, at underground work locations from 2001 to 2010. Rates are based on full-time equivalent (FTE) employees which equal 2,000 hours worked per year. In 2001 there were 40 occupational fatalities with a rate of 79.8 per 100,000 FTEs and in 2010 there were 46 fatalities with a fatality rate of 73.9 per 100,000 FTEs.

Mining Fatalities, Underground, by Accident Class, 2006-2010Mining Fatalities, Underground, by Accident Class, 2006-2010: This pie chart displays the distribution of occupational fatalities by accident class for underground mining locations for the period from 2006-2010. Excluding office employees, there were 139 underground fatalities. Ignition/explosion of gas or dust accounted for 33.8%. Fall of ground (in place) which includes MSHA’s Accident/Injury/Illness Classifications for “Fall of face, rib, pillar, side, or highwall from in place” and “Fall of roof, back, or brow from in place,” accounted for 31.7% of the underground fatalities. Powered haulage caused 17.3% of the underground fatalities and the All other category comprised 17.3%.

Mining Fatalities, Surface, 2001-2010Mining Fatalities, Surface, 2001-2010: This chart displays the number and rate of occupational mining fatalities, excluding office employees, at surface work locations from 2001 to 2010. Rates are based on full-time equivalent (FTE) employees which equal 2,000 hours worked per year. In 2001 there were 32 surface occupational fatalities with a rate of 13.9 per 100,000 FTEs and in 2010 there were 24 fatalities with a fatality rate of 11.2 per 100,000 FTEs.

Mining Fatalities, Surface, by Accident Class, 2006-2010Mining Fatalities, Surface, by Accident Class, 2006-2010: This pie chart displays the distribution of occupational fatalities by accident class for surface mining locations for the period from 2006-2010. Excluding office employees, there were 156 surface fatalities. Powered haulage had 29.5% of the fatalities and Machinery accounted for 21.8%. Slip or fall of person had 13.5 % of the surface mining fatalities and Falling, rolling, or sliding rock or material had 11.5%. Electrical made up 8.3% of the fatalities and the All other category was 15.4%.

Injuries

Mining Nonfatal Lost-time Injuries, 2001-2010Mining Nonfatal Lost-time Injuries, 2001-2010: This chart displays the number and rate of mining nonfatal lost-time injuries, excluding office employees, from 2001 through 2010. Full-time equivalent (FTE) employees are based on 2,000 employee hours worked per year. There were 9,949 nonfatal lost-time injuries in 2001 with an injury rate of 3.5 per 100 FTEs. In 2010, there were 5,623 nonfatal lost-time injuries with an injury rate of 2.0 per 100 FTEs.

Mining Nonfatal Lost-time Injuries, by Operator and Independent Contractor, 2001-2010Mining Nonfatal Lost-time Injuries, by Operator and Independent Contractor, 2001-2010: This chart displays the number and rate of mining nonfatal lost-time injuries, excluding office employees, from 2001 through 2010 by operators and independent contractors. Full-time equivalent (FTE) employees equal 2,000 hours worked per year. There were 8,893 nonfatal lost-time injuries in 2001 for operators with an injury rate of 3.7 per 100 FTEs. In 2001, independent contractors had 1,056 nonfatal lost-time injuries with an injury rate of 2.5 per 100 FTEs. Both operators and contractors had their lowest counts and injury rates in 2010. In 2010, operators had 5,009 nonfatal lost-time injuries with an injury rate of 2.2 per 100 FTEs. Contractors had 614 nonfatal lost-time injuries in 2010 with an injury rate of 1.2 per 100 FTEs. The last 6 years shows a steady decline in nonfatal injuries and injury rates for operators. For independent contractors, the decline has been steady for the past 5 years.

Mining Nonfatal Lost-time Injuries, Underground, 2001-2010Mining Nonfatal Lost-time Injuries, Underground, 2001-2010: This chart displays the number of occupational mining nonfatal lost-time injuries, excluding office employees, at underground work locations from 2001 to 2010. Rates are based on full-time equivalent (FTE) employees which equal 2,000 hours worked per year. In 2001, the number of nonfatal lost-time injuries was 3,570 with an injury rate of 7.1 per 100 FTEs. In 2010, the number of nonfatal lost-time injuries was 2,243 with an injury rate of 3.6 per 100 FTEs.

Mining Nonfatal Lost-time Injuries, Underground, by Commodity, 2001-2010Mining Nonfatal Lost-time Injuries, Underground, by Commodity, 2001-2010: This line graph displays the rate of lost-time injuries at underground work locations by commodity for 2001 through 2010. Rates are based on full-time equivalent (FTE) employees which equal 2,000 hours worked per year.


Mining Nonfatal Lost-time Injuries, Underground, by Accident Class, 2006-2010Mining Nonfatal Lost-time Injuries, Underground, by Accident Class, 2006-2010: This pie chart displays the distribution of nonfatal lost-time injuries by accident class for underground mining locations for the period from 2006-2010. Excluding office employees, there were 12,555 lost-time injuries. Handling materials had 28.5% of the nonfatal lost-time injuries, Slip or fall of person had 18.6 % of the nonfatal lost-time injuries, Fall of ground (from in place) had 15.6% of the nonfatal lost-time injuries. Fall of ground (from in place) which includes MSHA’s Accident/Injury/Illness Classifications for “Fall of face, rib, pillar, side, or highwall from in place” and “Fall of roof, back, or brow from in place”. Nonfatal injury cases classified under machinery were reclassified as a fall of ground (from in place) if the source of the injury was caving rock, ore, etc. This reclassification is consistent with how MSHA classifies similar incidents which resulted in a fatal injury. Powered haulage had 12.2 % of the nonfatal lost-time injuries and Machinery accounted for 11.2% of the nonfatal lost-time injuries. Hand tools had 6.4% of the nonfatal lost-time injuries and the All other category was 7.4% of the nonfatal lost-time injuries.

Mining Nonfatal Lost-time Injuries, Surface, 2001-2010Mining Nonfatal Lost-time Injuries, Surface, 2001-2010: This chart displays the number of occupational mining nonfatal lost-time injuries, excluding office employees, at surface work locations from 2001 to 2010. Rates are based on full-time equivalent (FTE) employees which equal 2,000 hours worked per year. The number of surface nonfatal lost-time injuries range from 6,379 with an injury rate of 2.8 per 100 FTEs in 2001 to 3,380 in 2010 with a rate of 1.6 per 100 FTEs.

Mining Nonfatal Lost-time Injuries, Surface, by Commodity, 2001-2010Mining Nonfatal Lost-time Injuries, Surface, by Commodity, 2001-2010: This line graph displays the rate of lost-time injuries at surface work locations by commodity for 2001 through 2010. Full-time equivalent (FTE) employees are based on 2,000 employee hours worked per year.


Mining Nonfatal Lost-time Injuries, Surface, by Accident Class, 2006-2010Mining Nonfatal Lost-time Injuries, Surface, by Accident Class, 2006-2010: This pie chart displays the distribution of nonfatal lost-time injuries by accident class for surface mining locations for the period from 2006-2010. Excluding office employees, there were 22,092 nonfatal lost-time injuries. Handling materials had 33.9% of the nonfatal lost-time injuries, Slip or fall of person had 27.9 % of the nonfatal lost-time injuries, Machinery had 10.3% of the nonfatal lost-time injuries. Nonfatal injury cases under machinery were reclassified as fall of ground (from in place) if the source of the injury was caving rock, ore, etc. This reclassification is consistent with how MSHA classifies similar incidents which resulted in a fatal injury. Hand tools had 10.1% of the nonfatal lost-time injuries, Power haulage accounted for 9.3% of the nonfatal lost-time injuries and the All other category was 8.5% of the nonfatal lost-time injuries.

 
Contact Us:
  • Office of Mine Safety and Health (OMSHR)
  • National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH)
  • Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
  • 800-CDC-INFO
    (800-232-4636)
    TTY: (888) 232-6348
  • New Hours of Operation
    8am-8pm ET/Monday-Friday
    Closed Holidays
  • omshr@cdc.gov
USA.gov: The U.S. Government's Official Web PortalDepartment of Health and Human Services
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention   1600 Clifton Rd. Atlanta, GA 30333, USA
800-CDC-INFO (800-232-4636) TTY: (888) 232-6348 - Contact CDC–INFO
A-Z Index
  1. A
  2. B
  3. C
  4. D
  5. E
  6. F
  7. G
  8. H
  9. I
  10. J
  11. K
  12. L
  13. M
  14. N
  15. O
  16. P
  17. Q
  18. R
  19. S
  20. T
  21. U
  22. V
  23. W
  24. X
  25. Y
  26. Z
  27. #