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Statistics: All Mining

Introduction

The following maps, graphs, and tables represent data for All Mining. The information is organized by Mines, Employees, Fatalities, and Injuries. The Mines section contains information on the number and location of the mining operations. The Employees section details the number of employees and the number of employee hours. The Fatalities section describes the number and rate of fatalities, the number and rate by work locations, and the number of fatalities by accident class. The Injuries section presents the number and rate of nonfatal lost-time injuries, the number and rate by work locations, and the number of injuries by accident class. Data source: Mine Safety and Health Administration (MSHA). See Statistical Methodology for further details. Additional Mining Facts for each commodity are available from 2000 through 2014.

Mines

Active Mining Operations by Commodity, 2014: United States map displaying symbols spotted randomly within counties for the locations of active mining operations by commodity. In 2014, there were a total of 13,604 mining operations that reported mine operator employment. The commodity breakdown was 1,632 coal, 345 metal, 911 nonmetal, 4,350 stone, and 6,366 sand & gravel mines. Mines at which only contractors were working did not show any employment and are not displayed.

 

Number of Active Mines by Sector and Year, 2005-2014: Graph displaying the number of active mines by sector for a 10-year period. Active mines are those mines that reported any mine operator employee hours during the year. The year with the highest number of active mining operations was 2008 when there were 14,907 active mines. Overall, there were 13,604 mines in 2014.  The commodity breakdown was 1,632 coal, 345 metal, 911 nonmetal, 4,350 stone, and 6,366 sand & gravel mines.

 

Locations of Active Underground Mining Operations, 2014: United States map displaying the locations of 704 active underground mining operations spotted randomly within counties. Active mines are those that report any operator employment during the year. Mines at which only contractors were working did not show any employment and are not displayed.

 

Locations of Active Surface Mining Operations, 2014: United States map displaying the locations of 12,900 active surface mining operations spotted randomly within counties. Active mines are those that report operator employment during the year. Mines at which only contractors were working did not show any employment and are not displayed.

 

Employees

Mine Operator Employees, 2014: United States map displaying employment density by county of the 248,699 mine operator employees in 2014. A graduated color ramp is used to symbolize densities of less than 25 employees, 25 to 49 employees, 50 to 199 employees, 200 to 499 employees, and 500 or more employees.

 

Number of Employee Hours Reported by Mine Operators and Independent Contractors by Sector and Year, 2005-2014: Graph displaying the number of employee hours for mine operator and independent contractors by mining sector over a 10-year period from 2005 through 2014. Over the period, coal operators had the most number of employee hours with a high of 215.2 million hours reported for 2011. From this point, the employee hours for coal operators have declined to 171.7 million in 2014. The next highest sector in 2014  was stone operators with 130.3 million hours. Metal operator employment increased from 63.4 in 2005 to a high of 95.0 million hours in 2013. Sand & gravel operator employee hours declined from a high of 79.6 in 2006 to a low of 51.7 in 2013. Employee hours over the period for nonmetal operators varied between 40.8 in 2009 to 52.7 million in 2014.  Employment for coal contractors varied from 54.3 million in 2011 to a low of 42.3 in 2014. Noncoal contractors showed an increase over the period from 54.1  in 2005 to 86.1 million hours in 2013.

 

Mine Operator Employees by Sector, 2014: Pie chart displaying the number and percentages of mine operator employees in 2014 by sector. Coal had 77,462 employees (31.1%), followed by stone with 65,682 (26.4%), metal with 44,838  (18.0%), sand & gravel with 34,361 (13.8%), and nonmetal with 26,356 employees (10.6%).

 

Mine Operator Employees, 2014 (Underground Work Locations): United States map displaying employment density by county for the 49,183 mine operator employees working at underground locations in 2014. A graduated color ramp is used to symbolize densities of less than 25 employees, 25 to 49 employees, 50 to 199 employees, 200 to 499 employees, and 500 or more employees.

 

Number of Underground Employee Hours Reported by Mine Operators and Independent Contractors by Sector and Year, 2005-2014: Graph displaying the number of underground employee hours reported by sector from 2005 through 2014. Coal operators had the most number of employee hours over the period varying from 80.9 million hours in 2005, to a high of 105.3 in 2011, and then a steady decline to 87.2 in 2014. From 2005 through 2013, metal operator employee hours increased from 8.4 to a high of 14.0 million hours. Over the period, nonmetal operators varied from 4.8 to 5.9 million employee hours. Stone operator employment ranged from 3.6 to 4.3 million hours. Employment for coal contractors ranged from a low of 5.7 million hours in 2005 to a high of 8.8 in 2011, with employment declining to 7.6 in 2014. The noncoal contractor employment varied over the period from 2.1 to 5.3 million hours.

 

Mine Operator Employees, 2014 (Surface Work Locations): United States map displaying employment density by county for the 199,516 mine operator employees working at surface work locations in 2014. A graduated color ramp is used to symbolize densities of less than 25 employees, 25 to 49 employees, 50 to 199 employees, 200 to 499 employees, and 500 or more employees.

 

Number of Surface Employee Hours Reported by Mine Operators and Independent Contractors by Sector and Year, 2005-2014: Graph displaying the number of surface employee hours reported by mine operators and independent contractors by sector for 2005 through 2014. Stone operators had the most number of employee hours over the period with a high of 166.5 million reported for 2006, decreasing  to 121.5 million hours in 2013.  Coal operator employee hours in 2005 were 100.4 million and climbed to a high of 109.9 in 2011 before declining to 84.4 million hours in 2014. Metal operator employee hours ranged from 55.0 in 2005 to 81.0 in 2013, before decreasing to 79.1 million in 2014. During the period, nonmetal operators ranged from a low of 35.8 in 2009 to a high of 46.8 million hours in 2014. Employment for coal contractors over the period ranged from a high of 45.5 million hours in 2011 to a low of 34.7 in 2014. Noncoal contractors showed an increase over the period from 51.9 in 2005 to 81.6 million hours in 2013. There were 77.0 million employee hours reported for noncoal contractors in 2014.

 

Fatalities

Occupational Mining Fatalities by Commodity, 2014Occupational Mining Fatalities by Canvass, 2014: United States map displaying occupational mining fatalities spotted randomly within counties. There were a total of 43 mining fatalities reported in 2014 (coal=15, metal=4, nonmetal=7, stone=10,  sand & gravel=7). The canvass class includes mine operators and independent contractors. Office employees are excluded.

 

Number and Rate of Occupational Mining Fatalities by Year, 2005-2014: Graph displaying the number and rate of occupational mining fatalities, excluding office employees, from 2005 through 2014. Full-time equivalent (FTE) employees are based on 2,000 employee hours worked per year. The numbers and rates vary by year with the highest rate of fatalities occurring in 2010 when 71 fatalities occurred at a rate of 25.7 fatalities per 100,000 FTEs. The lowest number was in 2009 when 34 fatalities occurred. The fatality rate was the lowest in 2012 with 11.7 fatalities per 100,000 FTEs.

 

Number and Rate of Occupational Mining Fatalities by Operator and Independent Contractor by Year, 2005-2014: Graph displaying the number and rate of occupational mining fatalities, excluding office employees, from 2005 through 2014. Full-time equivalent (FTE) employees are based on 2,000 employee hours worked per year. The numbers and rates vary by year with the highest fatalities occurring in 2010 when mine operators reported 58 fatalities occurring at a rate of 26.0 fatalities per 100,000 FTEs. The mine operator fatality rate was the lowest in 2009 (n=21) with 9.6 fatalities per 100,000 FTEs. The highest number of independent contractors fatalities was 18 during 2007 with a rate of 31.3 per 100,000 FTEs.

 

Number of Fatalities and Fatality Rate (5-year aggregates) in the Mining Industry by Commodity, 1911-2010: Chart displaying the number of fatalities and fatality rates in 5-year aggregates in the mining industry by coal and noncoal from 1911 through 2010, excluding office employees. Noncoal includes metal, nonmetal, stone, and sand and gravel operations. Sand and gravel miners were included starting in 1958. Full-time equivalent (FTE) employees are based on 2,000 employee hours worked per year. The fatality rate is based on 100,000 full time equivalent employees. The coal fatality rate shows a rapid decline in fatalities after the passage of the Federal Coal Mine Health and Safety Act of 1969. The Federal Mine Safety and Health Act of 1977 consolidated federal mine regulations for coal and metal/nonmetal under MSHA. The Mine Improvement and New Emergency Response Act of 2006 (MINER Act) amended the Federal Mine Safety and Health Act of 1977.

 

Number and Rate of Occupational Mining Fatalities at Underground Work Locations by Year, 2005-2014: Graph displaying the number and rate of occupational mining fatalities, excluding office employees, from 2005 through 2014. Full-time equivalent (FTE) employees are based on 2,000 employee hours worked per year. The numbers and rates vary by year with the highest rate of fatalities occurring in 2010 when 46 occurred at a rate of 73.9 fatalities per 100,000 FTEs. The fatality rate was the lowest in 2009 when there were 9 fatalities occurring at a rate of 15.4 per 100,000 FTEs.

 

Occupational Fatalities by Accident Class at Underground Mining Locations, 2010-2014: Pie chart displaying the distribution of occupational fatalities by accident class for underground mining locations for the period 2010 through 2014. Excluding office employees, there were 110 underground fatalities. The largest category during the period was "Ignition/explosion of gas or dust" with 26.4% of the underground fatalities. "Fall of ground (from in place)" which includes MSHA’s Accident/Injury/Illness Classifications for “Fall of face, rib, pillar, side, or highwall from in place” and “Fall of roof, back, or brow from in place,” accounted for 24.5%. "Powered haulage" caused 21.8%, "Machinery" caused 10.9%, and the "All other" category comprised 16.4% of the underground fatalities.

 

Number and Rate of Occupational Mining Fatalities at Surface Work Locations by Year, 2005-2014:  Graph displaying the number and rate of occupational mining fatalities, excluding office employees, from 2005 through 2014. Full-time equivalent (FTE) employees are based on 2,000 employee hours worked per year. The fatality numbers and rates have declined from a high of 40 fatalities in 2007 with a rate of 16.1 per 100,000 FTEs, to a low of 19 fatalities in 2012 with a rate of 8.3 per 100,000 FTEs.

 

Occupational Fatalities by Accident Class at Surface Mining Locations, 2010-2014: Pie chart displaying the distribution of occupational fatalities by accident class for surface mining locations for the period 2010 through 2014. Excluding office employees, there were a total of 117 surface fatalities. "Powered haulage" had 30.8% of the fatalities and "Machinery" accounted for 22.2%. "Slip or fall of person" had 14.5% and "Falling, rolling, or sliding rock or material"  had 13.7%  of the surface mining fatalities. The "All other" category accounted for 18.8% of the surface fatalities. Sum of percentages may not equal 100 due to independent rounding.

 

Injuries

Nonfatal Lost-time Injuries, 2014 (Mine Operators and Independent and Independent Contractors): Map of the United States displaying nonfatal lost-time injury density by county for mine operator and contractor injuries during 2014. Office workers are excluded. A graduated color ramp is used to symbolize densities of zero, 1 thru 9, 10 thru 29, 30 thru 49, and 50 or more injuries. The total number of nonfatal lost-time injuries in 2014 was 5,199.

 

Number and Rate of Mining Nonfatal Lost-time Injuries by Year, 2005-2014: Chart displaying the number and rate of mining nonfatal lost-time injuries, excluding office employees, from 2005 through 2014. Full-time equivalent (FTE) employees are based on 2,000 employee hours worked per year. The rate has declined steadily over the period from 2.9 per 100 FTEs in 2005 to 1.8 FTE is 2014. The number of injuries has also declined from 8,310 to 5,199 over the period.

 

Number and Rate of Mining Nonfatal Lost-time Injuries by Operator and Independent Contractor by Year, 2005-2014: Chart displaying the number and rate of mining nonfatal lost-time injuries, excluding office employees, by mine operators and independent contractors by year from 2005 through 2014. Full-time equivalent (FTE) employees equal 2,000 hours worked per year. The injury numbers and rates for both operators and contractors have declined over the period. There were 7,355 nonfatal lost-time injuries in 2005 for operators with an injury rate of 3.0 per 100 FTEs. By 2013, the operator injuries had decreased to 4,643 with a rate of 2.0 per 100 FTEs. The number of independent contractors injuries was the highest in 2006 with 1,009 injuries, and the lowest year was 535 injuries in 2014. The rates for contractors declined from 2.1 in 2005 to 0.9 per 100 FTEs in 2014.

 

Number and Rate of Mining Nonfatal Lost-time Injuries at Underground Work Locations by Year, 2005-2014: Chart displaying the number of mining nonfatal lost-time injuries, excluding office employees, at underground work locations from 2005 through 2014. Rates are based on full-time equivalent (FTE) employees which equal 2,000 hours worked per year. The nonfatal lost-time injury rate has declined over the period from 5.2 to 3.0 per 100 FTEs. In 2005, the number of nonfatal lost-time injuries was 2,772, declining to 1,853 nonfatal lost-time injuries reported in 2014.

 

Rate of Nonfatal Lost-time Injuries at Underground Work Locations by Mining Sector, 2005-2014: Graph displaying the rate of nonfatal lost-time injuries per 100 full-time equivalent employees at underground work locations by mining sector from 2005 through 2014. Note that a full-time equivalent employee (FTE) is computed using 2,000 hours worked to equal 1 FTE. Data are displayed for coal operators, metal operators, nonmetal operators, stone operators, coal contractors and noncoal contractors. Coal contractor fatality rates have shown the most dramatic decline over the period. All commodity fatal rates have shown downward trends over the 10-year period.

 

Nonfatal Lost-time Injuries by Accident Class for Underground Mining Locations, 2010-2014: Pie chart displaying the distribution of nonfatal lost-time injuries by accident class for underground mining locations for the period from 2010 through 2014. Excluding office employees, there were a total of 10,606 lost-time injuries. "Handling materials" had 33.1% and "Slip or fall of person" had 19.6% of the lost-time injuries. "Fall of ground (from in place)" which includes MSHA’s Accident/Injury/Illness Classifications for “Fall of face, rib, pillar, side, or highwall from in place” and “Fall of roof, back, or brow from in place,"  had 13.2% of the nonfatal lost-time injuries reported. Note that nonfatal injury cases classified under machinery were reclassified as a fall of ground (from in place) if the source of the injury was caving rock, ore, etc. This reclassification is consistent with how MSHA classifies similar incidents which resulted in a fatal injury. "Machinery" accounted for 10.5% and "Powered haulage"also had 10.5% of the nonfatal lost-time injuries. "Hand tools" had 6.0% and the "All other" category was 7.1% of the nonfatal lost-time injuries during the 5-year period. Note that the sum of percentages may not equal 100 due to independent rounding.

 

Number and Rate of Mining Nonfatal Lost-time Injuries at Surface Work Locations by Year, 2005-2014: Chart displaying the number of mining nonfatal lost-time injuries, excluding office employees, at surface work locations from 2005 through 2014. Rates are based on full-time equivalent (FTE) employees which equal 2,000 hours worked per year. The nonfatal lost-time injury rate has declined over the period from 2.4 to 1.5 per 100 FTEs. During the period, the highest number of nonfatal lost-time injuries occurred in 2005 when 5,538 were reported. The injuries continued to decline to a low of 3,310 being reported in 2013. A slight increase to 3,346 injuries occurred in 2014.

 

Rate of Nonfatal Lost-time Injuries at Surface Work Locations by Mining Sector, 2005-2014: Graph displaying the rate of nonfatal lost-time injuries per 100 full-time equivalent employees at surface work locations by mining sector from 2005 through 2014. Note that a full-time equivalent employee (FTE) is computed using 2,000 hours worked to equal 1 FTE. Data are displayed for coal operators, metal operators, nonmetal operators, stone operators, sand & gravel operators, coal contractors and noncoal contractors. Stone operators had the highest rates during the period and noncoal contractor rates were the lowest. In 2014, injury rates per 100 FTE employees sector ranged from 0.8 for noncoal contractors to 2.1 for stone operators.

 

Lost-time Injuries by Accident Class for Surface Mining Locations, 2010-2014: Pie chart displaying the distribution of nonfatal lost-time injuries by accident class for surface mining locations for the period from 2010 through 2014. Excluding office employees, there were a total of 16,812 lost-time injuries. "Handling materials" had 36.0%, "Slip or fall of person" had 29.5%, and "Hand tools" accounted for 9.7% of the nonfatal lost-time injuries. "Powered haulage" had 8.7% and "Machinery" accounted as 8.5% of the nonfatal lost-time injury cases. Note that cases classified under machinery were reclassified as a fall of ground (from in place) if the source of the injury was caving rock, ore, etc. This reclassification is consistent with how MSHA classifies similar incidents which resulted in a fatal injury. The "All other" category was 7.6% of the nonfatal lost-time injuries during the 5-year period.

 

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