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Independent Contractors

Introduction

The following graphs and tables represent data for the Coal and Noncoal (Metal, Nonmetal, Stone, and Sand & Gravel) Contractors. The information is organized by Employees, Fatalities, and Injuries. The Employees section details the number of employee hours by work location. The Fatalities section describes the number of occupational fatalities overall. The Injuries section presents the number of nonfatal lost-time injuries by work location and accident class. Data source: Mine Safety and Health Administration (MSHA). See Statistical Methodology for further details. Additional Mining Facts for each commodity are available from 2000 through 2013.

Employees

thumbnailNumber of Employee Hours Reported by Coal Contractors, 2004-2013: Graph displaying the number of coal contractor employee hours reported from 2004 through 2013. The employee hours increased over the period from a low of 38.5 million hours in 2004 to a high of 54.3 million hours reported for 2011. In 2013, there were 45.3 million employee hours reported to MSHA.

 

thumbnailNumber of Employee Hours Reported by Noncoal Contractors, 2004-2013: Graph displaying the number of noncoal contractor employee hours reported from 2004 through 2013. The employee hours increased from 46.8 million in 2004 to 80.2 million hours in 2008. After a decline to 56.9 million hours in 2009, the hours increased again to a high of 86.1 million employee hours in 2013.

 

thumbnailNumber of Underground Employee Hours Reported by Coal Contractors, 2004-2013: Graph displaying the number of underground coal contractor employee hours reported from 2004 through 2013. The employee hours increased over the period from a low of 4.7 million hours in 2004 to a high of 8.8 million hours reported for 2011. From that point, the hours have decreased to 7.1 million employee hours reported for 2013.

 

thumbnailNumber of Underground Employee Hours Reported by Noncoal Contractors, 2004-2013: Graph displaying the number of underground noncoal contractor employee hours reported from 2004 through 2013. The employee hours increased steadily from 1.8 million in 2004 to 4.0 million hours in 2008. After a decline to 2.6 million hours in 2009, the hours increased again to a high of 5.3 million employee hours in 2012. There were 4.5 million hours reported in 2013.

 

thumbnailNumber of Surface Employee Hours Reported by Coal Contractor, 2004-2013: Graph displaying the number of surface coal contractor employee hours reported from 2004 through 2013. The employee hours increased over the period from a low of 38.5 million hours in 2004 to a high of 45.5 million hours reported for 2011. In 2013, there were 45.3 million employee hours reported to MSHA.

 

thumbnailNumber of Surface Employee Hours Reported by Noncoal Contractors, 2004-2013: Graph displaying the number of surface noncoal contractor employee hours reported from 2004 through 2013. The employee hours increased steadily from 45.0 million in 2004 to 72.4 million hours in 2008. After a decline to 54.3 million hours in 2009, the hours steadily increased to a high of 81.6 million employee hours in 2013.

 

Fatalities

thumbnailCoal Contractor Occupational Mining Fatalities by Year, 2004-2013: Graph displaying the number of occupational mining fatalities, excluding office employees, from 2004 through 2013. Rates are not computed when there are a small number of events. Fatalities varied over the period with the highest number being 12 in 2008. The years with the least number of fatalities were 2012 and 2013 with 2 fatalities each.

 

thumbnailNoncoal Contractor Occupational Mining Fatalities by Year, 2004-2013: Graph displaying the number of occupational mining fatalities, excluding office employees, from 2004 through 2013. Rates are not computed when there are a small number of events. Fatalities varied over the period with the highest number being 12 in 2007. The years with the lowest number were 2005, 2012,  and 2013 with 2 fatalities each.

 

Injuries

thumbnailNumber and Rate of Coal Mining Contractor Nonfatal Lost-time Injuries at Underground Work Locations by Year, 2004-2013: Chart displaying the number and rate of coal mining contractor nonfatal lost-time injuries at underground work locations, excluding office employees, from 2004 through 2013. Full-time equivalent (FTE) employees are based on 2,000 employee hours worked per year. The numbers varied over the period from a high of 215 in 2006 to a low of 105 in 2013. The rates have shown a downward trend from 7.8 nonfatal lost-time injuries per 100 FTEs in 2004 to a low of 2.9 in 2013.  

 

thumbnailNumber and Rate of Noncoal Mining Contractor Nonfatal Lost-time Injuries at Underground Work Locations by Year, 2004-2013: Chart displaying the number and rate of noncoal mining contractor nonfatal lost-time injuries at underground work locations, excluding office employees, from 2004 through 2013. Full-time equivalent (FTE) employees are based on 2,000 employee hours worked per year. The numbers have varied over the period from a high of 49 in 2006 to a low of 25 in 2004. The rates rose from 2.8 nonfatal lost-time injuries per 100 FTEs in 2004 to 3.5 in 2006. From that point, the rates have declined to a low of 1.2 injuries per 100 FTEs in 2013.

 

thumbnailCoal Contractor Nonfatal Lost-time Injuries by Accident Class for Underground Mining Locations, 2009-2013: Pie chart displaying the distribution of nonfatal lost-time injuries by accident class for coal contractors at underground mining locations for the period from 2009 through 2013. Excluding office employees, there were a total of 671 lost-time injuries. "Handling materials" accounted for 32.3% and "Slip or fall of person" made up 18.3% of the nonfatal lost-time injures. "Fall of ground (from in place)," which includes MSHA's Accident/Injury/Illness Classifications for “Fall of face, rib, pillar, side, or highwall from in place” and “Fall of roof, back, or brow from in place,” accounted for  13.1% of the nonfatal lost-time injuries. Note that nonfatal injury cases classified under machinery were reclassified as a fall of ground (from in place) if the source of the injury was caving rock, ore, etc. This reclassification is consistent with how MSHA classifies similar incidents which resulted in a fatal injury. "Powered haulage" accounted for 11.9%, "Machinery" accounted for 11.2%, and the "All other" category made up 13.1% of the nonfatal lost-time injuries during the 5-year period. Note that the sum of percentages may not equal 100 due to independent rounding.

 

thumbnailNoncoal Contractor Nonfatal Lost-time Injuries by Accident Class for Underground Mining Locations, 2009-2013: Pie chart displaying the distribution of nonfatal lost-time injuries by accident class for noncoal contractors at underground mining locations for the period from 2009 through 2013. Excluding office employees, there were a total of 155 lost-time injuries. "Handling materials" had 34.8%, "Slip or fall of person" comprised 19.4%,  "Machinery" had 16.1% , and "Powered haulage" accounted for 11.0% of the nonfatal lost-time injuries during the 5-year period. "Fall of ground (from in place)", which includes MSHA’s Accident/Injury/Illness Classifications for “Fall of face, rib, pillar, side, or highwall from in place” and “Fall of roof, back, or brow from in place,” had 7.1% of the nonfatal lost-time injuries. Note that nonfatal injury cases classified under machinery were reclassified as a fall of ground (from in place) if the source of the injury was caving rock, ore, etc. This reclassification is consistent with how MSHA classifies similar incidents which resulted in a fatal injury. "Hand tools" had 5.2% and the "All other" category accounted for 6.5% of the nonfatal lost-time injuries. Note that the sum of percentages may not equal 100 due to independent rounding.

 

thumbnailNumber and Rate of Coal Mining Contractor Nonfatal Lost-time Injuries at Surface Work Locations by Year, 2004-2013: Chart displaying the number and rate of coal mining contractor nonfatal lost-time injuries at surface work locations, excluding office employees, from 2004 through 2013. Full-time equivalent (FTE) employees are based on 2,000 employee hours worked per year. The numbers have varied over the period from a high of 342 in 2006 to a low of 166 in 2013. The rates have shown a downward trend over the period. The highest nonfatal lost-time injuries rate was 1.9 per 100 FTEs in 2005 to a low injury rate of 0.9 in 2013.

 

thumbnailNumber and Rate of Noncoal Mining Contractor Nonfatal Lost-time Injuries at Surface Work Locations by Year, 2004-2013: Chart displaying the number and rate of coal mining contractor nonfatal lost-time injuries at surface work locations, excluding office employees, from 2004 through 2013. Full-time equivalent (FTE) employees are based on 2,000 employee hours worked per year. The numbers have varied over the period from a high of 463 in 2008 to a low of 223 in 2009. The rates have shown a downward trend over the period, decreasing from 1.6 in 2004 to 0.8 per 100 FTEs in 2013..

 

thumbnailCoal Contractor Nonfatal Lost-time Injuries by Accident Class for Surface Mining Locations, 2009-2013: Pie chart displaying the distribution of nonfatal lost-time injuries for coal contractors by accident class at surface mining locations for the period from 2009 through 2013. Excluding office employees, there were a total of 1,119 nonfatal lost-time injuries. "Slip or fall of person" had 32.4% and "Handling materials" had 31.3% of the nonfatal lost-time injuries. "Powered haulage" had 10.5% and "Machinery" accounted for 10.2% of the nonfatal lost-time injury cases. Note that nonfatal injury cases classified under machinery were reclassified as a fall of ground (from in place) if the source of the injury was caving rock, ore, etc. This reclassification is consistent with how MSHA classifies similar incidents which resulted in a fatal injury. "Hand tools" had 10.0% and the "All other" category was 5.6% of the nonfatal lost-time injuries during the 5-year period. Note that the sum of percentages may not equal 100 due to independent rounding.

 

thumbnailNoncoal Contractor Nonfatal Lost-time Injuries by Accident Class for Surface Mining Locations, 2009-2013: Pie chart displaying the distribution of nonfatal lost-time injuries by accident class for noncoal contractors at surface mining locations for the period from 2009 through 2013. Excluding office employees, there were a total of 1,420 lost-time injuries. "Handling materials" had 37.0% and "Slip or fall of person" had 26.9% of the nonfatal lost-time injuries. Note that nonfatal injury cases classified under machinery were reclassified as a fall of ground (from in place) if the source of the injury was caving rock, ore, etc. This reclassification is consistent with how MSHA classifies similar incidents which resulted in a fatal injury. "Machinery" comprised 12.1% and "Hand tools" had 8.7% of the nonfatal lost-time injuries. "Powered haulage" had 7.0% and the "All other" category accounted for 8.3% of the nonfatal lost-time injuries during the 5-year period.

 

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