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Incidence of Traumatic Brain Injury in the United States, 2002 and 2003 Updated Data Tables


In 2004, CDC published Traumatic Brain Injury in the United States: Emergency Department Visits, Hospitalizations, and Deaths.1 The report showed the national incidence of traumatic brain injury (TBI). Data are now available for 2002 and 2003. In the tables that follow, these data are used to update the national incidence of TBI-related emergency department (ED) visits, hospitalizations, and deaths. The 2003 tables presented here serve as a supplement to the data published in the Journal of Head Trauma Rehabilitation.2

Methods

The methods were similar to those described in Traumatic Brain Injury in the United States: Emergency Department Visits, Hospitalizations, and Deaths.1 The national incidence numbers, rates, and percentages of TBI visits to EDs, hospitalizations, and deaths for 2002 and 2003 were calculated by age, sex, and external cause (e.g., falls). TBI cases were identified using ICD-9-CM codes3 for ED visits and hospitalizations and ICD-10 codes4 for deaths, according to CDC’s electronic case definition.5 ED visits were identified from the National Hospital Ambulatory Medical Care Survey (NHAMCS),6 hospitalizations from the National Hospital Discharge Survey (NHDS),7 and deaths from the multiple cause-of-death data from the National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS).8 Rates were calculated using U.S. Census bridged-race population estimates from NCHS.9

For details, see the “Methods” section in Traumatic Brain Injury in the United States: Emergency Department Visits, Hospitalizations, and Deaths.

Data Tables
2002
2003



References

  1. Langlois JA, Rutland-Brown W, Thomas KE. Traumatic Brain Injury in the United States: Emergency Department Visits, Hospitalizations, and Deaths. Atlanta, GA: Dept. of Health and Human Services (US), Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Injury Prevention and Control; 2004.

  2. Rutland-Brown W, Langlois JA, Thomas KE, Xi YL. The incidence of traumatic brain injury in the United States, 2003. J Head Trauma Rehabil 2006;21; In press.

  3. Dept. of Health and Human Services (US). International Classification of Diseases, 9th Revision: Clinical Modification (ICD-9-CM). 3rd ed. Washington, DC: Dept. of Health and Human Services (US); 1989.

  4. World Health Organization (WHO). List of official ICD-10 updates [online] 2001 [cited 2006 07 10]. Available from: URL: www.who.int/classifications/icd/icd10updates/en/index.html.

  5. Marr AL, Coronado VG, editors. Central Nervous System Injury Surveillance Data Submission Standards—2002. Atlanta, GA: Dept. of Health and Human Services (US), Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Injury Prevention and Control; 2004.

  6. McCaig LF, McLemore T. Plan and operation of the National Hospital Ambulatory Medical Care Survey. Vital Health Stat 1994;1(34).

  7. Dennison C, Pokras R. Design and operation of the National Hospital Discharge Survey: 1988 redesign. Vital Health Stat 2000;1(39).

  8. Hoyert DL, Heron MP, Murphy SL, Kung H. Deaths: final data for 2003. Nat Vital Stat Rep; vol 54 no 13. Hyattsville, MD: National Center for Health Statistics; 2006.

  9. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). U.S. Census populations with bridged race categories. Hyattsville (MD): Department of Health and Human Services (US), CDC, National Center for Health Statistics; 2003. Available from: URL: www.cdc.gov/nchs/about/major/dvs/popbridge/popbridge.htm.
     

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