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New CDC Data for TB in the U.S. – Key Graphics

High-resolution, downloadable graphics — Public Domain Images Ready to Print in Your Publication


From this page, you may download several different options of the full infographic highlighting findings from CDC’s new cost analysis for the treatment of drug resistant TB (downloadable PDF and high-resolution version, as well as embeddable images). Individual components of the infographic are also available. Additionally, graphics highlighting major findings from CDC’s analysis of 2013 national surveillance data are available for download.

These images are in the public domain and are thus free of any copyright restrictions. As a matter of courtesy, we request that the content provider be credited and notified of any public or private usage of an image.

Please note that these resources are for reporters. If you are a member of the general public and seek additional information about TB, please visit http://www.cdc.gov/tb/. If you have additional questions, please call 1(800) CDC INFO or email cdcinfo@cdc.gov.

Infographic: Costly Burden of Drug-Resistant TB

The first graphic shows the average treatment costs per case in 2010 dollars. The average cost to treat to treat drug-susceptible TB is $17,000; $134,000 to treat MDR TB; and $430,000 to treat XDR TB. If you include productivity losses experienced by patients while undergoing treatment, costs are even higher.  The average treatment cost for MDR Tb with productivity loss is $260,000 and $554,000 for XDR TB.
The second graphic shows the major human cost of drug-resistant TB.  Of those treated for drug-resistant TB 9% died during treatment; 27% stopped working; 73% were hospitalized; and 37% required home isolation.
The third graphic shows the percentage of patients that experience severe treatment side effects.  Of those treated for drug-resistant TB 19% experienced depression/psychosis; 13% experienced hearing impairment; 13% experienced hepatitis; 11% experiences kidney impairment; 8% experienced loss of mobility; 7% experienced vision impairment; and 1% experienced seizures.
The fourth graphic outlines the steps required to prevent and control MDR and XDR TB in the U.S. such as better treatment options, rapid diagnosis, expert treatment of every TB case, and improving global TB diagnosis and treatment. The Costly Burden of Drug-Resistant TB in the United States
View High Resolution Version
Multidrug-resistant (MDR) tuberculosis is a major health threat globally. Nearly half a million MDR TB cases are estimated to occur worldwide annually, including cases that are extensively drug-resistant (XDR).

This infographic highlights that while MDR and XDR TB are relatively rare in the U.S., their treatment comes at a terrible price – it is very expensive, takes a long time to treat, disrupts lives, and has potentially life-threatening side effects.

Infographic – Printable PDF


Embeddable Images: Costly Burden of Drug-Resistant TB

TB Embeddable infographic

 

TB Embeddable infographic

 

TB Embeddable infographic.

 

Infographic Components: Costly Burden of Drug-Resistant TB

This bar chart shows the average treatment costs per case in 2010 dollars.  The average cost to treat to treat drug-susceptible TB is $17,000; $134,000 to treat MDR TB; and $430,000 to treat XDR TB. 
If you include productivity losses experienced by patients while undergoing treatment, costs are even higher.  The average treatment cost for MDR TB with productivity loss is $260,000 and $554,000 for XDR TB.The Outsized Financial Toll of MDR and XDR TB

View High Resolution Version
The average cost of treating each TB case increases with greater resistance. Average direct cost ranges from $17,000 to treat drug-susceptible TB to $430,000 to treat the most drug-resistant form of the disease (XDR TB). When including productivity losses experienced by patients while undergoing treatment, costs are even higher.


This graphic shows the major human cost of drug-resistant TB.  Of those treated for drug-resistant TB 9% died during treatment; 27% stopped working; 73% were hospitalized; and 37% required home isolation.A Major Human Cost

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In addition to the economic toll, treatment for drug-resistant TB comes at a major cost to patients’ quality-of-life. Of those treated for drug-resistant TB 9% died during treatment; 27% stopped working; 73% were hospitalized; and 37% required home isolation.


This bar chart shows the percentage of patients that experience severe treatment side effects. 
Of those treated for drug-resistant TB 19% experienced depression/psychosis;  13% experienced hearing impairment; 13% experienced hepatitis; 11% experiences kidney impairment; 8% experienced loss of mobility; 7% experienced vision impairment; and 1% expereinced seizures.Severe Treatment Side Effects

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Substantial proportion of patients treated for drug-resistant TB experience serious side effects, including: depression/psychosis, hearing loss, hepatitis, and kidney impairment, among others.


Graphics: Key 2013 National TB Surveillance Data

Reported TB Cases in the United States, 1982-2013

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The resurgence of TB in the mid-1980s was marked by several years of increasing case counts until its peak in 1992. Case counts began decreasing again in 1993, and 2013 marks the 21st year of decline in the total number of TB cases reported in the United States since the peak of the resurgence. This line graph shows the number of reported TB cases in the United States between 1982 and 2013. There was a resurgence of TB in the mid-1980s with several years of increasing case counts until its peak in 1992. In 1993, case counts began decreasing again. Since the peak, 2013 marks the 21st year of decline in the total number of TB cases reported in the U.S.


This bar graph shows the rate of reported TB in the United States broken down by race/ethnicity in 2013. Rates for Asians (18.7/100,000), blacks (5.3), and Hispanics (5.0) were 26, seven, and seven times higher than among whites (0.7), respectively. TB Rates by Race/Ethnicity, 2013

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Although TB rates declined among all racial/ethnic groups, TB rates among racial/ethnic minorities are much higher than those of whites. Rates for Asians (18.7/100,000), blacks (5.3), and Hispanics (5.0) were 26, seven, and seven times higher than among whites (0.7), respectively.


This pie chart shows the proportion of reported TB cases in the United States broken down by national origin in 2013. The proportion of TB cases among foreign-born persons was 65% and 35% among U.S.-born persons. Proportion of TB Cases by National Origin, 2013

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Despite declines in the rates of TB among both foreign- and U.S.-born individuals, the TB rate among foreign-born persons was 13 times higher than among U.S.-born persons.

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