Skip directly to search Skip directly to A to Z list Skip directly to navigation Skip directly to site content Skip directly to page options
CDC Home

New Jersey's Success


Helping to reduce the number of children that are exposed to lead

New Jersey Environmental Tracking Program Logo

What is the problem?

Childhood lead poisoning is a problem in New Jersey, mainly because of exposure to lead-based paint. Before 1950, indoor paint had high levels of lead. In New Jersey, about 30% of housing was built before 1950. In several counties, 40–50% of the housing was built before 1950. These homes pose the highest risks for exposure to lead-based paints.

What did Tracking do?

Through a partnership with the New Jersey Tracking Network, the New Jersey Child and Adolescent Health Program now conducts more sophisticated data analyses than were previously available. Geocoding and mapping of childhood lead datasets has become routine. Childhood lead poisoning rates are now available by county, municipality, year of birth, and calendar year of lead testing. This has helped public health officials target resources where they are most needed.

Improved public health

The number of New Jersey children under age 17 who have been reported with childhood lead poisoning (greater or equal to 10 ug/dL) has decreased from 4,048 in 2005 to 1,358 in 2010. This is a 66% decrease. In the future, the New Jersey Department of Health and Senior Services (NJDHSS) will begin to look at the distribution of blood lead levels below 10 ug/dL. This will help to continue the decrease in lead exposure among New Jersey's children.



Improving the ability to share environmental information between state agencies

Line graph of nondescript data

What is the problem?

Creating environmental datasets for public health purposes and sharing them between state agencies can be expensive, difficult, and slow. The New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection (NJDEP) wanted a secure and easy way to share numerous environmental datasets with the New Jersey Department of Health and Senior Services (NJDHSS) on an ongoing basis.

What did Tracking do?

NJDEP Tracking partners worked with other Tracking states and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) to design and build improvements to an existing national environmental network. The National Environmental Information Exchange Network (EN) fit their needs. EN enhancements have now made the environmental datasets more useful for public health tracking. They have expanded the information available for tracking use. These improvements allow Tracking partners in all states to share meaningful environmental data between state agencies, which was difficult to do previously.

Improved public health

The New Jersey Tracking Program now uses the EN to obtain environmental datasets. NJSHAD now analyzes and publishes these as drinking water and air quality indicators. Because of New Jersey's leadership, interagency environmental data sharing improved not only in New Jersey, but in all Tracking states. U.S. EPA is now working to make the expanded EN air monitoring and drinking water data exchange the national standard for state environmental protection agencies.



Providing information on disease rates to advocacy organizations, health planners, health care providers, and governmental agencies

Woman using laptop computer

What is the problem?

Organizations and agencies have ongoing needs for accurate timely health outcome data for the regions and populations they serve. It can be difficult to find and obtain health related data, especially data for a particular community.

What did Tracking do?

NJSHAD has become a one-stop New Jersey public health resource. Advocates for Children of New Jersey said, "we use SHAD Query to get a lot of the health related data we need, such as statistics on low infant birth weight and infant mortality. SHAD is self explanatory, and has both county and municipal level data, and you can get data by race and age-group." A consultant to New Jersey's Federally Qualified Health Centers said, "when you need to make a compelling case to document unmet needs, the data is specific and available. That can be important in a place like New Jersey, where there are huge health disparities by race, ethnicity, or education level."

Improved public health

NJ SHAD data has already made a difference. When Advocates for Children of New Jersey published NJ SHAD data as part of their annual NJ Kids Count 2010 County Profile Rankings, a low ranked county in southern New Jersey was surprised by some of their numbers. The county has responded by creating a workgroup to track and improve their county's health statistics. As stated by Advocates for Children of New Jersey, "when numbers are put in a book, you can't ignore them."



New Jersey's Grantee Profile

[PDF 338 KB]



Contact Us:
  • Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
    1600 Clifton Rd
    Atlanta, GA 30333
  • 800-CDC-INFO
    (800-232-4636)
    TTY: (888) 232-6348
    Contact CDC-INFO
USA.gov: The U.S. Government's Official Web PortalDepartment of Health and Human Services
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention   1600 Clifton Road Atlanta, GA 30329-4027, USA
800-CDC-INFO (800-232-4636) TTY: (888) 232-6348 - Contact CDC–INFO
A-Z Index
  1. A
  2. B
  3. C
  4. D
  5. E
  6. F
  7. G
  8. H
  9. I
  10. J
  11. K
  12. L
  13. M
  14. N
  15. O
  16. P
  17. Q
  18. R
  19. S
  20. T
  21. U
  22. V
  23. W
  24. X
  25. Y
  26. Z
  27. #