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Sixth National Environmental Public Health Conference:
Preparing for the Environmental Public Health Challenges of the 21st Century

Breakout Sessions
Wednesday, December 3
3:30 p.m. - 5:00 p.m.

W15: Preparing the 21st-Century Environmental Health Workforce: The Vision for Tomorrow
Room: CHEROKEE – 2nd Floor

Environmental health services were the backbone of public health in the United States for many decades. During the last century, improvements in environmental health and sanitation have resulted in

 

 

the elimination of more than 80% of human diseases and have added 25 years to the life span of Americans. However, today the environmental health system is in a state of crisis. Lack of support and fragmentation of state, tribal, territorial, and local environmental health programs have led to a system that is poorly prepared to address current and emerging environmental public health issues. This session will expand upon the previous workforce development session in discussing ways to develop a well-prepared environmental health workforce that can anticipate, recognize, and respond to future threats to public health.

Session Objectives:
At the end of this session, participants will be able to do the following:
1) Share important ideas and concepts for the development of the
    environmental health workforce of the future.
2) Recognize visionary proposals for improving the knowledge and
    skills of the environmental health workforce.

Moderator:
CAPT Michael Herring, REHS, MPH; National Center for Environmental
   Health/Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry

Presenters:
Patrick Bohan, USPHS (Ret), RS, MS, MSEH; East Central University,
   Ada, Oklahoma
Thomas Burke, PhD, MPH, BS; Bloomberg School of Public Health, Johns
   Hopkins University
Sharunda Buchanan, PhD, MS, BS; National Center for Environmental
   Health/Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry

W16: Emerging Issues in Assessing Human Exposure: Pesticides
Room: WALTON – 2nd Floor

Because of the widespread presence of pesticides in the environment and the critical gaps in knowledge of pesticide exposures and their potential health risks, research in this area is critical. To address these issues, many researchers are conducting multicomponent studies to evaluate the most appropriate exposure assessment techniques. These techniques include biomonitoring, longer term dosimeters for transient exposures, dose-modeling, and composite assessments in environmental matrices. These exposure measures are being used to describe population-based correlates of exposure to pesticides and to determine if any relation exists between pesticide exposure and disease. Many of these studies are targeting vulnerable or at-risk populations such as children, the economically disadvantaged, and pregnant women. This session will bring together noted experts in the field of pesticide exposure assessment and pesticide-related disease epidemiology to discuss their research results.

Session Objectives:
At the end of this session, participants will be able to do the following:
1) Recognize the state-of-the-science work in pesticide exposure and
    risk assessment.
2) Understand the complexities involved with exposure and risk
    assessment for chemicals that do not appreciably persist in the
    environment or in humans.

Moderator:
Dana Barr, PhD; National Center for Environmental Health/Agency for
   Toxic Substances and Disease Registry

Presenters:
Robin Whyatt, DrPH; Mailman School of Public Health, Columbia
   University
Richard Fenske, PhD; University of Washington
Chensheng Alex Lu, PhD; University of Washington
Asa Bradman, PhD, MS; University of California at Berkeley

W17: Assessing Asthma Control Using Survey Data
Room: HENRY – 2nd Floor

Asthma prevalence estimates can be derived from several survey data sources, including national data sources and state surveillance surveys. Comprehensive or detailed asthma history data sources are less common. To assess asthma control levels in the general population, these data sources need to be identified, and measurement methods need to be understood.

Session Objectives:
At the end of this session, participants will be able to do the following:
1) Identify sources of data for measurement of asthma control.
2) Provide a forum for discussion on the measurement of asthma
    control using identified data sources.

Moderator:
Jeanne Moorman, MS; National Center for Environmental
   Health/Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry

Presenters:
Lara Akinbami, MD; National Center for Health Statistics, Centers for
   Disease Control and Prevention
Colleen Kelley, MD; Rollins School of Public Health, Emory University
Susan Bohm, MA; Michigan Department of Community Health
Sarah Lyon-Callo, MA, MS; Michigan Department of Community Health
Michael Kogan, PhD; Maternal and Child Health Bureau, Health
   Resources and Services Administration

W18: Five Perspectives on CDC’s National Report on Human Exposure to Environmental Chemicals
Room: FORSYTHE – 2nd Floor

Interest in CDC’s National Report on Human Exposure to Environmental Chemicals is keen among many different groups. In this session, representatives from federal agencies, a state health department, industry, and an environmental advocacy group will discuss the impact, application, and utility of the Report as it applies to their particular agency or organization.

Session Objective:
At the end of this session, participants will be able to do the following:
1) Describe how five different groups—both those outside and inside
    the government—view the usefulness and impact of CDC’s National
    Report on Human Exposure to Environmental Chemicals
.

Moderator:
Eric Sampson, PhD; National Center for Environmental Health/Agency
   for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry

Presenters:
Sam Wilson, MD; National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences
Tina Bahadori, DSc; American Chemistry Council
Geoff Lomax, DrPH; California Department of Health
Charlotte Brody, RN; Health Care Without Harm
Hal Zenick, PhD; U.S. Environmental Protection Agency

W19: Response to a Potential Covert Act of Chemical Terrorism
Room: CLAYTON – 2nd Floor

Increasing emphasis is being placed on protecting the nation from possible acts of chemical, radiologic, and biologic terrorism. Acts of terrorism may be covert and difficult to identify when the nation’s food or water supply is the vector used to deliver agents. The public health response to a covert act of chemical terrorism will necessitate interaction among various agencies and professions, including law enforcement officials, the media, and the health care community. The major objective of this session will be to identify the potential obstacles to coordinating such a public health response. One presenter will first discuss an historical chemical exposure incident that resulted in a mass poisoning and then reintroduce the scenario as an intentional act of terrorism. The panel will include representatives from law enforcement and from medical and public health agencies that most likely would be involved in identifying, containing, and resolving the covert act of terrorism. Secondary goals of this session will be to (1) develop solutions to overcome the identified obstacles and (2) derive strategies to enhance investigations and prevent the spread of disease.

Session Objectives:
At the end of this session, participants will be able to do the following:
1) Identify pitfalls in coordinating a response to a covert act of chemical
    terrorism.
2) Provide possible solutions to enhance the interagency response to
    a covert act of chemical terrorism.

Moderator:
Manish Patel, MD, MSc; National Center for Environmental Health/Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry

Presenters:
Bill Watson, PharmD, DABAT, FAACT, FCCP; American Association of
   Poison Control Centers
Anthony Tomassoni, MD, MS; Northern New England Poison Center
Colonel Michael Sperry, Maine State Police Headquarters

W20: Improving Quality of Life Through Integrated Pest Management
Room: FULTON – 2nd Floor

Rats and mice are destructive pests capable of transmitting disease to humans. Rodents destroy tons of food, and they affect the quality of our lives in many other ways. In urban areas, rats and mice depend almost exclusively on the built environment to survive and thrive. In some communities, more than 50% of the premises are infested with these pests. In this session, nationally renowned experts on integrated pest management (IPM) will examine the threats that rats and mice pose in urban, suburban, and rural environments. Topics of discussion will include (1) environmental and human factors associated with infestation, (2) reasons for the resurgence of the rat and mouse problem in many communities, (3) current practices to manage the problem, (4) the importance of IPM in the management of pest infestation, and (5) efforts to promote the application of IPM principles. Two CDC-supported cooperative-agreement demonstration programs—one of which is being implemented in New York City and the other of which is being implemented in Philadelphia—will be highlighted.

Session Objectives:
At the end of this session, participants will be able to do the following:
1) Describe the environmental and human factors associated with pest
    infestation.
2) Explain and apply the principles of IPM.

Moderator:
Randall Hirschhorn, MPA, MS, MEd; Environmental Health Services, City
   of Philadelphia Department of Public Health

Presenters:
Stephen Frantz, MS, PhD; Global Environmental Options
Arturo Aguirre, REHS, MA; County of Los Angeles Department of Health
   Services
James Gibson, MPH; New York City Department of Health and Mental
   Hygiene
Palak Raval-Nelson, MPH, PhD (candidate); City of Philadelphia
   Department of Public Health

W21: Voices From the Field: Community Members and Their Views
Room: NEWTON – 2nd Floor

Increasing evidence indicates that low-income and minority communities are burdened with a disproportionate share of exposure to hazardous substances. These exposures often have adverse effects on the health and quality of life of residents. During this session, ethnically diverse panel members will discuss residents’ perceptions about the public health activities that NCEH/ATSDR and its partners engage in to address environmental health concerns. The panel will discuss challenges, strategies, and areas that need improvement.

Session Objectives:
At the end of this session, participants will be able to do the following:
1) Discuss the health challenges experienced by affected communities
    that are related to environmental health threats.
2) Explore opportunities for “win-win” scenarios between government,
    business, and community partners.

Moderator:
Francisco Tomei-Torres, PhD; National Center for Environmental
   Health/Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry

Presenters:
Mildred McClain, MA, EdD; Citizens for Environmental Justice
Roland Gaona, South Texas Network on Economic and Environmental
   Justice
Laura Goodman, Dine’ Citizens Against Ruining Our Environment

W22: MTBE and Fuel Oxygenate Exposure Issues
Room: ROCKDALE – 2nd Floor

Speaker presentations will focus on methyl tertiary-butyl ether (MTBE)/fuel oxygenate environmental contamination, pharmacokinetics of exposure, and exposure assessment. Speakers will (1) present data describing the national prevalence of MTBE/fuel oxygenate contamination of surface and ground water, (2) describe studies detailing the pharmacokinetics of MTBE exposure, and (3) describe an MTBE exposure-assessment study involving a community with MTBE-contaminated drinking water. A summary panel discussion will take place after the presentation.

Session Objectives:
At the end of this session, participants will be able to do the following:
1) Describe the scope of the MTBE/fuel oxygenate contamination
    (prevalence and magnitude).
2) Discuss appropriate public health messages for individuals
    concerned about fuel oxygenate exposure.

Moderator:
Ben Blount, PhD; National Center for Environmental Health/Agency for
   Toxic Substances and Disease Registry

Presenters:
Lisa Vallejo, MPH; National Center for Environmental Health/Agency for
   Toxic Substances and Disease Registry
James Prah, PhD; U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
John Zogorski, PhD; U.S. Geological Survey

W23: Describing the Elephant: Evaluation of a Complex Community-based Intervention
Room: COBB – 2nd Floor

Many public health problems cannot be addressed by using a single approach or intervention but instead require multiple and complementary strategies directed at diverse groups of individuals in multiple venues. The formation of collaboratives or coalitions has become popular as a means of integrating, coordinating, and facilitating complex interventions. This session will address the challenge of conceptualizing and measuring the added benefits and outputs achieved through problem-focused coalitions, and will present, as a case study, the Controlling Asthma in St. Louis (CASL) project of the St. Louis Regional Asthma Consortium. The CASL project, part of the Controlling Asthma in American Cities Project, focuses on decreasing asthma morbidity among inner-city children through clinical, environmental, educational, and policy interventions. The presentation will describe the project’s logic model, including the anticipated role and outputs of the coalition, the selection of milestones of coalition and project effectiveness, the choice of process indicators, measurement of short-term and long-term outcomes, and identified indicators of health effect. The session will also discuss the methods and tools selected to evaluate the activities and outputs of the coalition itself.

Session Objectives:
At the end of this session, participants will be able to do the following:
1) Explain the approach described for conceptualizing and measuring
    the processes and outputs of problem-oriented public health
    coalitions.
2) Discuss a case study demonstrating the planning, implementation,
    and evaluation of a complex community-based intervention.

Moderator:
Elizabeth Herman, MD, MPH; National Center for Environmental
   Health/Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry

Presenters:
Francis Butterfoss, PhD; Center for Pediatric Research
Richard Kurz, St. Louis University School of Public Health

W24: Protecting and Promoting Children’s Environmental Health
Room: PAULDING – 2nd Floor

Evidence from the growing environmental health science base indicates that environmental threats to children’s health are present from preconception through the teen-age years. Presenters in this session will describe strategies that are being employed to protect children from environmental health threats and to promote their health and well-being.

Session Objectives:
At the end of this session, participants will be able to do the following:
1) Describe at least two environmental threats to children’s health and
    development.
2) Identify at least two strategies to protect children from
    environmental health threats.

Moderator:
Elizabeth Howze, ScD, CHES; National Center for Environmental
   Health/Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry

Presenters:
Melisse McDiarmid, MD; University of Maryland School of Medicine
John Osterloh, MD; National Center for Environmental Health/Agency
   for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry
Michelle Kegler, PhD; Rollins School of Public Health, Emory University
Leslie Rubin, MD; Southeast Pediatric Environmental Health Specialty
   Unit, Emory University

W25: Impact of Zoning Laws on the Public’s Health
Room: DeKALB – 2nd Floor

Zoning laws have a significant potential to protect and promote the public’s health. Examples include early zoning laws that were developed to prevent the spread of tuberculosis and to keep residential areas separate from noxious industrial sites. However, some current zoning codes do not promote health. Codes that require a minimum number of parking spaces per housing unit but do not require sidewalks encourage automobile dependency and discourage walking. Zoning codes that encourage or restrict stores that sell tobacco, alcohol, and unhealthy food may influence the health of community residents. This breakout session will (1) review the literature on how zoning laws affect the public’s health, (2) identify areas that need further research, (3) discuss practical examples that a public health official and a community planner in the same local jurisdiction have used, and (4) describe how these two individuals interacted to promote health as part of community design decisions.

Session Objectives:
At the end of this session participants will be able to do the following:
1) Describe the effects of zoning on public health and research needs.
2) List practical examples of how local health and planning officials
    have used zoning to improve public health in their communities.

Moderator: Moderator:
Andrew L. Dannenberg, MD, MPH; National Center for Environmental
   Health/Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry

Presenters:
Stephen Teret, JD, MPH; Johns Hopkins University School of Public
   Health
Carol MacLennan, Tri-County Health Department
Ronald Hovland, BA; Arapahoe County Planning Division, Centennial,
   Colorado

W26: A Nationwide Consultative Network Linking Medical Toxicology Fellowship Programs and NCEH/ATSDR Regional Offices
Room: DOUGLAS – 2nd Floor

A network that links the NCEH/ATSDR regional offices and medical toxicology fellowship training programs has been developed to enhance preparedness for mass chemical exposures and chemical terrorism. This session will describe the genesis of the network and explore the benefits of developing a closer working relationship between medical toxicologists and federal agencies such as NCEH/ATSDR that are involved in environmental health. A primary objective of the American College of Medical Technology-NCEH/ATSDR partnership is to enhance both the service components and the education aspect of the NCEH/ATSDR mission and the medical toxicology fellowship training. The presenters will discuss how this consultative network offers medical (i.e., physician) toxicology expertise to the NCEH/ATSDR regional offices on an as-needed basis. Available consultation services include direct consultation with other health care providers, medical data review, chemical-specific consultative advice, terrorism preparedness training, acute-exposure event referrals, educational outreach, and public-information session support. A pilot project will be discussed that uses the Community Chemical Hazard Assessment Survey to enhance the ability of medical toxicologists to identify and respond to chemical hazards in their communities

Session Objectives:
At the end of this session, participants will be able to do the following:
1) Describe the relationship between the medical specialty of medical
    toxicology and NCEH/ATSDR.
2) Discuss the utility of medical toxicology consultation in the delivery
    of environmental public health services.

Moderator:
Paul Wax, MD; American College of Medical Toxicology

Speakers:
Paul Wax, MD; American College of Medical Toxicology
Mark Kirk, MD; American College of Medical Toxicology
Stephanie Ostrowski, DVM, MPVM, ACVPM; National Center for
   Environmental Health/Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease
   Registry

W27: Tracking Children’s Blood Lead Levels: NEDSS
Room: FAYETTE – 2nd Floor

CDC is developing a lead program area module (Lead PAM) for the National Electronic Disease Surveillance System (NEDSS). NEDSS is an integrated surveillance system that supports the collection, management, analysis, and dissemination of public health data. Lead PAM is a specific component of NEDSS. Current deficiencies and the inability of Systematic Tracking of Elevated Lead Levels and Remediation (STELLAR) and other lead data systems to support the needed integration for the collection, management, transmission, analysis, and dissemination of public health lead data is driving the request to develop Lead PAM. The goal of Lead PAM is to improve surveillance and case management for all childhood lead poisoning prevention programs (CLPPPs). Lead PAM is being developed with substantial input and feedback from state and local CLPPPs that may use the system. Presenters will discuss the status of Lead PAM. They will also discuss how Lead PAM can improve lead surveillance and case management, how lead programs will benefit from an integrated surveillance system, and how Lead PAM can pioneer environmental surveillance integration efforts.

Session Objectives:
At the end of this session, participants will be able to do the following:
1) Describe the development process for Lead PAM.
2) Explain how Lead PAM and integrated surveillance systems can
    improve CLPPPs.
3) Discuss how Lead PAM can pioneer environmental surveillance
    integration efforts.

Moderator:
Pamela Meyer, PhD; National Center for Environmental Health/Agency
   for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry

Presenters:
Wendy Blumenthal, MPH; National Center for Environmental
   Health/Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry
Chris Sellers, MPH; Alabama Childhood Lead Poisoning Prevention
   Program
Jerry Gibson, MD, MPH; South Carolina Department of Health and
   Environmental Control
Patrick Wall, BS; National Center for Environmental Health/Agency for
   Toxic Substances and Disease Registry

W28: Building and Lead PAM Capacity for Community-based Strategies
Room: CARTER – 3rd Floor

Community-based organizations, volunteers, and leaders in high-risk neighborhoods are uniquely positioned to document health hazards in and around their homes and to pursue resources and policy solutions for corrective action. Local organizations that are partners with the Community Environmental Health Resource Center, a project of the Alliance for Healthy Homes (formerly the Alliance to End Childhood Lead Poisoning), have collectively deployed volunteers to assess more than 2000 homes for health hazards (lead, cockroaches, moisture/mold, radon, and carbon monoxide). The groups are developing partnerships with the public and private sectors and are organizing advocacy efforts in more than 10 cities. Community-based organizations are also working with the Alliance on strategies to leverage the federal Lead Disclosure Rule.

Session Objectives:
At the end of this session, participants will be able to do the following:
1) Identify community-based strategies for policy change.
2) Identify methods for building capacity to implement community-
    based strategies.

Moderator:
Julia Burgess, BA, MSW; Alliance for Healthy Homes

Presenters:
Julia Burgess, BA, MSW; Alliance for Healthy Homes
Beth McKee-Huger, BA, MSW; Greensboro Housing Coalition
Willena Cannon, Greensboro Housing Coalition
Don Ryan, BS, MURP; Alliance for Healthy Homes
Thomas Neltner, BS, JD; Improving Kids Environments

W29: Communications Messages to Promote Environmental Public Health Services
Room: JACKSON – 3rd Floor

There is a strong need for “messaging” the importance of environmental public health to stakeholders, decision makers, and the public. Communication and marketing are important components of CDC’s recently published National Strategy to Revitalize Environmental Public Health Services. This session will discuss this strategy as well as the results of several focus groups that reviewed the document. This session also will discuss how best to (1) promote the importance of environmental public health services and (2) develop a communication plan that will help environmental public health personnel market their programs.

Objectives:
At the end of this session, participants will be able to do the following:
1) Identify ways to promote the importance of environmental public
    health services.
2) Describe how to develop a communications plan that will help
    environmental public health personnel market their programs.

Moderator:
Sascha Fielding, National Center for Environmental Health/Agency for
   Toxic Substances and Disease Registry

Presenters:
Sascha Fielding, National Center for Environmental Health/Agency for
   Toxic Substances and Disease Registry
Alejandra Tres, Association of Environmental Health Academic
   Programs
 



This page last reviewed December 21, 2011