CDC logo menu background CDC logo Search Health Topics A-Z menu background menu background
Sixth Environmental Public Health Conference Banner  


Sixth National Environmental Public Health Conference:
Preparing for the Environmental Public Health Challenges of the 21st Century

Breakout Sessions
Wednesday, December 3
1:30 p.m. - 3:00 p.m.

W1: Preparing the 21st Century Environmental Health Workforce: Meeting the Challenges of Today
Room: CHEROKEE – 2nd Floor

The threats of terrorism; emerging pathogens such as West Nile virus, E. coli 0157:H7, hantavirus, noroviruses, and cryptosporidium; and other environmental health issues have

 

 

presented an unprecedented challenge to the field of environmental public health. These threats and issues have arisen as the environmental health workforce is shrinking, enrollment in America’s accredited environmental health programs is declining, and gaps in environmental health leadership are widening. This session will examine ongoing activities to train and educate the environmental public health workforce to meet the challenges of the 21st century.

Session Objectives:
At the end of this session, participants will be able to do the following:
1) Describe the methods by which the accredited environmental health
    programs and schools of public health are improving the skills and
    capabilities of the environmental health workforce and are
    developing the next generation of environmental health leaders.
2) List ongoing activities that are being undertaken to develop and
    prepare the 21st century environmental health workforce to meet
    the increasing challenges of today.

Moderator:
CAPT Michael Herring, REHS, MPH; National Center for Environmental
   Health/Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry

Presenters:
Gary Silverman, DEnv, MS, BA; Bowling Green State University
Daniel Boatright, PhD, MS, BS; Oklahoma University
Alejandra Tres, MPA, BS; Association of Environmental Health Academic
   Programs
Ken Sharp, BA; Iowa Department of Public Health

W2: Second National Report on Human Exposure to Environmental Chemicals: Description, Uses, and Findings
Room: WALTON – 2nd Floor

The Second National Report on Human Exposure to Environmental Chemicals assessed the exposure of the U.S. population to 116 environmental chemicals using biomonitoring for the time period 1999-2000. These chemicals included lead, cadmium, mercury, uranium, other heavy metals, dioxins, furans, polychlorinated biphenyls, polyaromatic hydrocarbons, phthalates, organochlorine pesticides, organophosphate pesticides, carbamate pesticides, phytoestrogens, herbicides, and environmental tobacco smoke. The discussion will focus on the design, development, and uses of the National Report as well as selected findings and applications.

Session Objectives:
At the end of this session, participants will be able to do the following:
1) Understand internal dose exposure assessment using
    biomonitoring.
2) Understand the results of the National Report that will help public
    health efforts detect and prevent harmful population exposures to
    environmental chemicals.

Moderator:
James Pirkle, MD, PhD; National Center for Environmental Health/Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry

Presenters:
James Pirkle, MD, PhD; National Center for Environmental Health/Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry
John Osterloh, MD, MS; National Center for Environmental Health/Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry

W3: Challenges to Asthma Control in the 21st Century
Room: HENRY – 2nd Floor

Asthma is a highly prevalent disease that cannot be cured. Control of the disease is possible, though many challenges exist. The session will address the key challenges to successfully managing the problem of asthma in the 21st century. These key challenges (and the subjects of individual presentations) are as follows: (1) there is a lack of complete understanding of the basic science of the disease, (2) challenges surround data availability and use, (3) effective partnerships need to be developed to address the problem of asthma, and (4) effective environmental interventions must be developed and implemented.

Session Objectives:
At the end of this session, participants will be able to do the following:
1) List five or more challenges to addressing asthma in the 21st
    century.
2) Understand asthma data in the light of the many challenges to
    understanding the disease itself.

Moderator:
Patricia Waniewski, RN, MS; New York State Department of Health

Presenters:
Paul Williams, MD; University of Washington School of Medicine
Sarah Lyon Callo, MA, MS; Michigan Department of Community Health
Richard Kreutzer, MD; California Department of Health Services
Karen Burrell, American Lung Association of Maine

W4: The Resurgence of Healthy Housing: New Opportunities for Public and Environmental Health Professionals
Room: FORSYTHE – 2nd Floor

Because we spend much of our time indoors, a safe and healthy home environment is an important factor for our growth and development. Researchers, practitioners, and policymakers are increasingly interested in the concept of “healthy homes.” The movement presents new opportunities for public health professionals to prevent poor health outcomes (e.g., asthma, injuries, and lead poisoning) through improvements to the residential environment.

This session will describe scientific findings regarding the relation between housing and health. Information about changes in national policy that focus on the home environment will be discussed, as will opportunities for federal funding of healthy homes initiatives. Actual case studies also will be presented to demonstrate how housing and health practices have been integrated to promote health.

Session Objectives:
At the end of this session, participants will be able to do the following:
1) Discuss the scientific evidence linking housing and health.
2) Identify funding opportunities for healthy homes activities and give
    examples of healthy homes activities that they can implement in
    their communities.

Moderator:
Rebecca L. Morley, MS; National Center for Healthy Housing

Presenters:
Pat McLaine, RN, MPH; National Center for Healthy Housing
David Jacobs, U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development
Joe Beck, Eastern Kentucky University
Jim Krieger, MD, MPH; Seattle/King County Department of Health
Doug Farquhar, JD; National Conference of State Legislatures

W5: Public Health Preparedness and Response to Radiation and Chemical Incidents
Room: CLAYTON – 2nd Floor

The public health community needs to be prepared to respond to any kind of incident involving radioactive materials or chemicals, regardless of whether the event is unintentional or intentional. This panel session will discuss the preparedness and response activities associated with an incident involving radioactive material and chemicals (hazmat). The panel will also provide information on assistance provided by CDC’s environmental health laboratories and the National Guard Bureau’s Weapons of Mass Destruction Civil Support Teams.

Session Objectives:
At the end of this session, participants will be able to do the following:
1) Understand the importance of preparedness in order to provide an
    effective response to any situation affecting environmental public
    health.
2) Understand the environmental public health components of
    preparedness and response to an incident involving the
    unintentional or intentional release of hazardous materials.

Moderator:
Ronald C. Burger, BS; National Center for Environmental Health/Agency
   for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry

Presenters:
Charles W. Miller, PhD; National Center for Environmental
   Health/Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry
Stephanie Ostrowski, DVM, MPVM, ACVPM; National Center for
   Environmental Health/Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease
   Registry
David Ashley, PhD; National Center for Environmental Health/Agency
   for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry
Major Jeffery Allen, Georgia National Guard Bureau

W6: Using a Systems Approach in Environmental Health Investigations
Room: GWINNETT – 2nd Floor

Typical approaches to investigating disease outbreaks or designing prevention programs focus on identifying pathogens or toxins of concern and determining actual or potential routes of exposure. A systems-based approach seeks not only to identify what the agent is and how the exposure occurred but also to determine why the exposure occurred. The systems approach evaluates an entire infrastructure system to assess whether it is protecting public health and preventing the spread of disease or disease-causing agents. For example, in evaluating drinking-water supply facilities using a systems approach, the entire system of delivery—from source to user to disposal—is considered. This approach also looks at the existence and effectiveness of barriers within systems that are intended to prevent or eliminate contamination. In addition, the approach goes beyond simply looking at the physical elements of infrastructure and considers institutional factors that may influence public health.

Session Objective:
At the end of this session, participants will be able to do the following:
1) Describe the basic concepts of planning and implementing a
    systems-based approach to environmental health investigations.

Moderator:
Richard Gelting, PhD, MS; National Center for Environmental
   Health/Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry

Presenters:
Charles Higgins, MSEH; National Park Service
John Sarisky, MPH; National Center for Environmental Health/Agency
   for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry
Michael Beach, PhD; National Center for Infectious Diseases, Centers
   for Disease Control and Prevention
Steve Monroe, PhD; National Center for Infectious Diseases, Centers
   for Disease Control and Prevention
Carol Selman, MPH; National Center for Environmental Health/Agency
   for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry

W7: Ongoing Challenges in Preventing Carbon Monoxide Poisoning
Room: FULTON – 2nd Floor

This breakout session will focus on carbon monoxide (CO) toxicity, including modes of exposure, successful prevention efforts, and current challenges. The moderator will provide a short introduction and brief overview of the historical issues involved in CO toxicity (e.g., vehicle emissions and the effective prevention of CO poisoning through the implementation of automobile emission-control devices). Panel members will identify ongoing modes of CO exposure, focusing on the challenges of preventing human exposure to CO. Discussion topics include sources of CO poisoning from boats (both generator and engine), CO exposure from alternative heating or power sources used during disaster situations, and chronic low-level CO poisoning.

Session Objectives:
At the end of this session, participants will be able to do the following:
1) Identify ongoing modes of exposure for CO poisoning.
2) Describe historical and current social, technologic, and legislative
    challenges to preventing human exposure to CO.

Moderator:
Amanda Brown, PhD; National Center for Environmental Health/Agency
   for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry

Presenters:
Neil Hampson, MD; Virginia Mason Medical Center
Scott Earnest, PhD, PE, CSP; National Institute for Occupational Safety
   and Health, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
David Penney, PhD; Wayne State University School of Medicine

W8: Genetics in Epidemiologic Studies
Room: NEWTON – 2nd Floor

The genetics revolution, led by the Human Genome Project, will provide scientists with the ability to identify people who are at risk for the adverse effects of toxic environmental substances. Researchers are conducting numerous epidemiologic investigations in an effort to clarify this genetic component of risk and to understand how genes and the environment interact. This session will educate those investigators who would like to add genetic components to their studies about the factors that will determine the utility of their results regarding genetic risk. These factors include specimen type, study design, and available technology.

Session Objectives:
At the end of this session, participants will be able to do the following:
1) Recognize the complexities and limitations of the study of genetic
    risk factors as they contribute to multifactorial disease.
2) Identify state-of-the-art genetic technology.

Moderators:
Joy Chang, National Center for Environmental Health/Agency for Toxic
   Substances and Disease Registry
Suzanne Cordovado, National Center for Environmental Health/Agency
   for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry

Presenters:
Karen Steinberg, PhD; National Center for Environmental
   Health/Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry
Jack Taylor, MD, PhD; National Institute of Environmental Health
   Sciences
Margaret Gallagher, PhD; National Center for Environmental
   Health/Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry

W9: Evaluating Progress Toward Eliminating Childhood Lead Poisoning
Room: ROCKDALE – 2nd Floor

CDC’s goal related to the prevention of childhood lead poisoning is to eliminate it as major public health problem in the United States by the year 2010. With a focus on this goal, CDC has supported the development and operation of state-based and community-based childhood lead poisoning prevention programs (CLPPPs) since the early 1990s. The rapid approach of 2010 makes evaluating the progress even more important. Many state and local programs, using a variety of tools and data sources, have defined elimination of lead poisoning for their respective jurisdictions. This session will examine the evaluation methods used to demonstrate progress, including the use and integration of multiple data sources such as state and local surveillance systems, Medicaid, housing/tax assessor information, and environmental health tracking programs. Also discussed will be the CDC’s role in helping state and local CLPPPs evaluate their programmatic activities.

Session Objectives:
At the end of this session, participants will be able to do the following:
1) Discuss the role of evaluation in childhood lead elimination.
2) List ways in which CDC is helping CLPPPs meet the challenge of
    evaluation.

Moderator:
Philip (Penn) Jacobs, BS; National Center for Environmental
   Health/Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry

Presenters:
Mary Jean Brown, ScD, RN; National Center for Environmental
   Health/Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry
Mary Ann Amrich, RN; Maine Department of Human Services
Jessica Leighton, PhD; New York City Department of Health and Mental
   Hygiene

W10: Afghanistan: Public Health Problems Faced by an Emergency-affected  Population
Room: COBB – 2nd Floor

War and civil strife leave populations vulnerable to disease, injury, and other causes of poor health. Conflict and political instability in Afghanistan have left its population at risk for such public health problems. The international community needs sound data and an accurate assessment of the health problems in Afghanistan as they plan programs to meet immediate needs and to reconstruct the Afghan public health system. CDC, in conjunction with the Vietnam Veterans of America Foundation (VVAF), conducted the postwar National Mortality, Injury, Disability, and Mental Health Survey in Afghanistan, the results of which describe the magnitude of emergent health problems. CDC and VVAF presenters will discuss findings from this survey and explain the applicability of such surveys in other postconflict environments.

Session Objectives:
At the end of this session, participants will be able to do the following:
1) Describe specific health problems faced by emergency-affected
    populations.
2) Identify how the results of postwar surveys can help direct aid
    funding.

Moderator:
Mark Anderson, MD, MPH; National Center for Environmental
   Health/Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry

Presenters:
Joe Donahue, Vietnam Veterans of America Foundation
William Barron, MS; Vietnam Veterans of America Foundation
Charles Conley, MA; Vietnam Veterans of America Foundation
Oleg Bilukha, MD, MPH; National Center for Environmental
   Health/Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry
Barbara Lopes-Cardozo, MD, MPH; National Center for Environmental
   Health/Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry

W11: Health Effects of Acute Air Pollution Episodes
Room: PAULDING – 2nd Floor

This breakout session will focus on the health effects of acute air pollution exposures, such as forest fires. The moderator will provide an overview of demonstrated community health effects resulting from acute episodes of such exposures. The speakers will present results from recent studies regarding public health efforts to reduce exposures of the general public and susceptible populations to acute air pollution. Discussions will focus on susceptible populations, indoor penetration of particulates in relation to the recommendation to stay indoors, the effectiveness of air-cleaning devices and masks, the feasibility of evacuation to avoid smoke exposure, and the validation of biologic markers of exposure. The final speaker will outline the challenges associated with protecting public health during acute pollution episodes and will also identify future research needs.

Session Objectives:
At the end of this session, participants will be able to do the following:
1) Identify respiratory health effects, susceptible populations, and
    effective interventions.
2) Recognize the limitations and challenges faced by epidemiologists
    conducting such interventions.

Moderator:
Allison Stock, PhD; National Center for Environmental Health/Agency for
   Toxic Substances and Disease Registry

Presenters:
Christopher Simpson, PhD; University of Washington
Luke Naeher, PhD; University of Georgia
Judy T. Zelikoff, PhD; New York University School of Medicine

W12: Impact of the Built Environment on the Public’s Health
Room: DeKALB – 2nd Floor

Increasing evidence suggests that land use and transportation decisions facilitate or obstruct the creation and maintenance of healthy communities. The health-enhancing design of housing, roads, parks, transit systems, and many other aspects of the built environment can protect and improve the quality of life for its citizens by promoting healthy behaviors, minimizing hazards, and preserving the natural environment. Conversely, sprawling developments may deter physical activity and increase automobile dependence. Such problems can contribute to air pollution, car crashes, and pedestrian injuries and negatively influence the mental health of individuals and the social capital of communities. Several universities have developed interdisciplinary graduate training programs in both community planning and public health to educate the workforce in this area. This breakout session will review evidence regarding the effect of the built environment on health and safety. Presenters will describe one state’s efforts to promote physical activity through community design. They also will discuss the development of interdisciplinary training programs in community planning and public health.

Session Objectives:
At the end of each session, participants will be able to do the following:
1) Recognize the effect that the built environment has on health and
    identify the actions that public health officials can take to encourage
    community design that promotes health.
2) Describe existing interdisciplinary graduate training programs in
    planning and public health.

Moderator:
Andrew L. Dannenberg, MD, MPH; National Center for Environmental
   Health/Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry

Presenters:
Andrew L. Dannenberg, MD, MPH; National Center for Environmental
   Health/Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry
Deb Spicer, RD, MPH; New York State Department of Health
Frederick Collignon, PhD, FAICP; University of California, Berkeley

W13: Protecting Public Health Through Enhanced Chemical Industry Security
Room: DOUGLAS – 2nd Floor

The session will cover voluntary measures the chemical industry has taken to address new security concerns. The role of the chemical industry in public health relative to security will be discussed. The chemical industry’s security code also will be discussed.

Session Objectives:
At the end of this session, participants will be able to do the following:
1) Understand how the chemical industry’s security needs have
    changed since September 11, 2001.
2) Identify security actions that the chemical industry has taken since
    September 11, 2001.

Moderator:
Lee Salamone, MA, BS; American Chemistry Council

Presenters:
Stefanos Kales, MD, MPH, FACP; Harvard Medical School

W14: What’s in the Water: Pharmaceuticals as Emerging Contaminants
Room: FAYETTE – 2nd Floor

Studies in the United States and Europe have detected pharmaceutical compounds in both drinking water and drinking water sources. The challenge is to assess the degree to which pharmaceutical compounds in the environment and in drinking water pose a threat to human health and to the environment. This session will address the following key challenges: (1) how to assess water supplies for the presence and concentrations of pharmaceutical compounds, (2) how to conduct risk assessment from a regulatory perspective, and (3) how to assess the human and ecological risk of this growing problem.

Session Objectives:
At the end of this session, participants will be able to do the following:
1) Identify the problem posed by pharmaceuticals that are in the
    environment and in water supplies.
2) Recognize current regulatory and research approaches to
    understanding human health risks from pharmaceuticals that are in
    the environment and in drinking water.

Moderator:
Jane Horton, MS; National Center for Environmental Health/Agency for
   Toxic Substances and Disease Registry

Presenters:
Michael Focazio, PhD; Office of Water Quality, U.S. Geological Survey
Anthony Maciorowski, PhD; Office of Water, U.S. Environmental
   Protection Agency
Damian Shea, PhD; North Carolina State University
 



This page last reviewed December 21, 2011