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CDC Growth Charts PowerPoint Presentation

(Speaker notes and slide text are located at bottom of page.)

slide 26

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Slide 26 of 47


 


Speaker Notes

Here you see a section of the BMI-for-age chart for boys enlarged to show the shape of the curve in more detail. After 4 to 6 years of age, BMI-for-age begins a gradual increase through adolescence and most of adulthood. The rebound or increase in BMI that occurs after it reaches its lowest point is referred to as "adiposity" rebound. This is a normal pattern of growth that occurs in all children.

Recent research has shown that the age when the "adiposity" rebound occurs may be a critical period in childhood for the development of obesity as an adult. An early "adiposity" rebound, occurring before ages 4 to 6, is associated with obesity in adulthood. In the example shown here, adiposity rebound occurred at around age 3. BMI reached the lowest point at 32 months (2 years 8 months) and then began to increase.

However, studies have yet to determine whether the higher BMI in childhood is truly adipose tissue versus lean body mass or bone. Additional research is needed to further understand the impact of early adiposity rebound on adult obesity. (Note that we put the word adiposity in quotations when using it in this context since we do not know if it is truly adipose tissue.)

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Slide Text

Shape of BMI-for-Age Growth Curve: “Adiposity” Rebound (AR)

Example: Early AR

Image: A line graph, representing a growth chart for "Boys: 2 to 20 years" displayed.  This graph illustrates the "Adiposity" Rebound (AR) described in the speaker notes using the following plotted points.

Age
(mos)
BMI
26 18.2
32 17.4
38 18.5
41 18.7


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This page last updated November 02, 2007

United States Department of Health and Human Services
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion
Division of Nutrition and Physical Activity