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CDC Growth Charts PowerPoint Presentation

(Speaker notes and slide text are located at bottom of page.)

slide 16

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Slide 16 of 47


 


Speaker Notes

Practitioners have asked about the impact of the new reference population on the prevalence of nutrition indicators including stunting or shortness, underweight, and overweight. To answer this question, data from NHANES III were used to compare the 2000 (new) reference with the 1977 (old) reference. There are only slight differences in the prevalence rates of shortness, underweight, and overweight when using the new reference. Fewer children will be classified as short or stunted, but a few more will be classified as underweight.

Specifically, among children < 2 years old:

  • the prevalence of stunting or shortness, defined as length-for-age less than the 5th percentile, is 1% to 2% lower;
  • Underweight, defined as weight-for-length less than the 5th percentile, is 1% to 2% higher; and
  • Overweight, defined as equal to or greater than the 95th percentile, is 2% lower for females and 2% lower for males.

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Slide Text

Prevalence of Nutritional Status Indicators New Reference Curves Compared with Old Curves*

< 2 Years Old

Nutrition Indicator Change in Prevalence

Stunting/shortness
length-for-age <5th
1% to 2% lower

Underweight
weight-for-length <5th
1% to 2% higher

Overweight
weight-for-length >95th
2% lower for females
2% higher for males

* NHANES III


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This page last updated November 02, 2007

United States Department of Health and Human Services
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion
Division of Nutrition and Physical Activity