Skip directly to search Skip directly to A to Z list Skip directly to navigation Skip directly to site content Skip directly to page options
CDC Home

Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA) - Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs)

Important Announcement

If your organization did not register on the Central Contractor Registration (CCR) system before it went down on July 24, you may still register your organization using the new System for Award Management (SAM) at www.sam.gov. Failure to completing your registration prior to the application deadline, August 7, 2012, may result in your application not being accepted in www.grants.gov. Additional information on how to register can be found at https://www.sam.gov/sam/transcript/Quick_Guide_for_Grants_Registrations_v1.7.pdf [PDF–41K].

 

Pre-application support calls were held on June 28, 2012. A transcript of the scripted portion of the call is available for download now. Additional questions from the support calls have been logged and will appear on this page as they are answered. (PDF–69K)

General

Eligibility

Recipient Activities

Funding and Budget

Deadlines and Timelines

Technical Assistance for Applicants

Letters of Intent/Application Process

Definitions and Terminology

Other

 

General

If your sub-recipients are 3 tribes, is that enough given that the FOA CFDA 93.738 states "Identify and award funding to 10-15 local partners or community-based organizations)?

Applicants that intend to serve intervention populations within tribes, tribal organizations, or U.S. territories (regardless of the racial or ethnic group of the intervention population) must be able to reach at least 3 different tribal nations and/or reach tribal populations within at least 3 states by funding between 10 and 15 local partners or community-based organizations.

How should the Project Abstract, Project Narrative, Budget Information for Non-Construction Program, and Budget Narrative be included in applications for this FOA?

The following are mandatory documents that are included in the application package on www.grants.gov:

  • Application for Federal Assistance (SF-424)
  • Project Abstract Summary
  • Disclosure of Lobbying Activities (SF-LLL)
  • Budget Information for Non-Construction Programs
  • HHS Checklist Form PHS-5161
  • Project Narrative Attachment Form
  • Budget Narrative Attachment Form

These mandatory documents should be added to applicants' Grant Application Packages by selecting each Mandatory Document on page 1 clicking the button to "Move Form to Complete." Once completed, all mandatory and any optional documents that the applicant wishes to attach should be included within the PDF Grant Application Package submission. No more than a total of 10 attachments should be uploaded.

Can we submit NIH "biosketches" in place of CVs and is there any page limit to either?

Yes, NIH Biographical Sketches are acceptable in place of resumes/CVs provided that they meet all of the requirements in the FOA under section IV. Application and Submission Information, B. Organizational Capacity and Infrastructure. Resumes (including "biosketches") must be limited to two pages per person/position for each professional staff member named in the proposal.

Should sub-recipients develop their local community action plans before or after they have assessed community needs?

Grantees should ensure that sub-recipients finalize their local community action plan within 60 days of the sub-recipient award. Grantees will assist sub-recipients in incorporating input from CDC subject matter experts, if provided. In addition, a grantee should ensure that sub-recipients complete a new (or enhance a recent existing) community assessment and policy scan within 120 days of the sub-recipient award. CDC will provide guidance on sample assessments to recipients after awards are made.

Is it possible for a recipient to focus on more than one of the REACH health outcome measures?

Yes, applicants may elect to focus on one, multiple, or all of the outcome measures described in the FOA: changes in weight, proper nutrition, physical activity, tobacco use, and emotional wellbeing and overall mental health.

Can academic institutions be sub-recipients?

Yes, provided that they meet the criteria listed in the FOA under Section I. Funding Opportunity Description, Recipient Activities, B. Fund and Manage Sub-Recipients.

Are churches/faith-based organizations included in definition of "10-15 local partners or community-based organizations (sub-recipients)?"

Yes, provided that they meet the criteria listed in the FOA under Section I. Funding Opportunity Description, Recipient Activities, B. Fund and Manage Sub-Recipients.

Will the June 28 teleconferences be made available to applicants (in written or audio form)? Will there be any subsequent pre-application conference calls?

The script from the pre-application calls is posted online at http://www.cdc.gov/reach/pdf/reach-foa-call-script.pdf [PDF–63K]
There will not be any additional pre-application calls. However, questions can be submitted up until July.

Do you have to develop a separate community action plan for each State?

No, recipients are required to contribute to the development and implementation of one community health action plan to address chronic disease health disparities within their target population. All sub-recipient community action plans should feed into the grantee's work plan and overall objectives.

What's the relationship between REACH, the REACH Demonstration Project, and other current or former REACH initiatives, such as REACH 2010, REACH CORE, REACH US, and REACH Minority Serving Organizations?

The two new FOAs build upon, further disseminate, and expand the evidence base established with previous REACH and other community health programs. In addition, the two new FOAs continue the focus on engaging community partners to reduce health disparities.

Why does the FOA require that grantees allocate 75% of funds to sub-recipients?

The allocation of at least 75% of awarded funds to local partners or community-based organizations ensures funding is spread broadly to local communities to allow them to implement evidence- and practice-based strategies that reduce health disparities at the local level. We anticipate that through this FOA, 60 to 150 local communities across the country will be supported to work on eliminating health disparities.

What does the requirement mean that grantees must ensure that their sub-recipients reach at least 75% of their selected intervention population?

Sub-recipients should seek to reach the same selected intervention population(s) that was selected by the grantee. The grantee should ensure that sub-recipients propose and implement strategies that reach at least 75% of the selected intervention population within the sub-recipient's geographic area for at least some proposed activities. Additional activities can be more targeted, based on burden and need.

Is there an advantage for applicants or sub-recipients who partner with currently funded Community Transformation Grant awardees?

Applicants or sub-recipients located in the same geographic area as currently-funded programs with similar goals, such as Community Transformation Grants, are encouraged to work together to leverage existing work, such as coalitions and other program efforts; however, they must not duplicate efforts. The evaluation criteria in the FOA do not provide a scoring advantage to applicants working with currently-funded programs.

Will our group be scored higher if we address optional activities in the FOA?

The application criteria are found in Section IV of the FOA. Addressing optional activities does not provide a scoring advantage or disadvantage to applicants.

Is the strength of a proposal correlated to the number of states within a multi-state network? Will greater weight be given to applicants that cover more states within their network?

The FOA does not provide a scoring advantage to applicants that cover more states within their network.

Is there a specific amount of funds that should be used for evaluation?

No, the applicant should determine the appropriate proportion of funds to be used for evaluation based on proposed activities.

Will CDC be providing support on data collection, specifically how and what type of data should be collected from sub-recipients?

Yes, CDC will provide guidance on data collection, including strategies to determine cost per person reached for interventions, and guidance and recommendations for applied program evaluation to grantees and sub-recipients conducting additional evaluation activities.

What is the purpose of the new Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA) that CDC is issuing for the Racial and Ethnic Approaches to Community Health (REACH) program?

This funding opportunity announcement is designed to fund national or multi-state organizations to:

  • Fund, manage, support, and monitor sub-recipients to address racial and ethnic health disparities and implement evidence- and practice-based strategies that reduce health disparities for intervention population(s) experiencing high burden of disease or risk factors.
  • Contribute to the development and implementation of a community health action plan to address chronic disease health disparities.

How does the REACH FOA differ from the REACH Demonstration Project FOA, released at the same time?

Recipients of the REACH FOA may choose to implement strategies to address disparities in cardiovascular disease, diabetes, breast and cervical cancer, infant mortality, asthma, and child and adult immunization. The FOA focuses on changes in weight, proper nutrition, physical activity, tobacco use, and emotional well-being and overall mental health. Funding provided through this funding opportunity announcement (FOA) is designed to support recipients to develop and implement comprehensive programs to address health disparities in racial or ethnic groups, through a national or multi-state infrastructure. Applicants for the REACH FOA should demonstrate a national or multi-state reach through partnerships or program activities allowing them to fund local partners. Seventy-five percent of funds must be distributed to these local community-based organizations or partners.

The REACH Demonstration Project FOA addresses obesity and hypertension prevention strategies, which are two of the leading risk factors for chronic diseases. Obesity and hypertension result in a high disease burden within racial and ethnic minority populations. A priority of this project is to increase the evidence around effective strategies to reduce obesity and hypertension in populations experiencing health disparities. Evaluation and dissemination activities will be emphasized. Recipients funded through the REACH Demonstration Project will implement program activities to impact selected populations within a geographic area.

What is the project period of the awards?

The FOA is written to support a project period of up to five years. Throughout the period, CDC's commitment to the continuation of awards will be conditioned on the availability of funds, evidence of satisfactory progress by the recipient (as documented in required reports), and the determination that continued funding is in the best interest of the Federal government.

Top of Page

Eligibility

If we have sub-recipients funded through us from other funding sources (e.g. CTG), but are able to delineate sub-recipient activities addressing CTG focus and those other activities addressing REACH focus, can we fund the same sub-recipient?

Recipients should identify and award funding to 10-15 local partners or community-based organizations through appropriate mechanisms established by the grantee's procurement procedures. However, funds from this FOA may not be used to replace or supplant funding received under any other CDC cooperative agreement. In addition, recipients must ensure that any sub-recipients funded in jurisdictions already receiving CDC funding for community-level chronic disease programs are conducting complementary and not duplicative efforts.

Are community health outreach worker programs eligible for sub-recipient activities if they are linked to systems change or environmental change?

Yes, activities to develop or improve community health outreach worker program systems are eligible. Grantees should ensure that selected sub-recipients implement evidence based or practice based strategies that will reduce health disparities with as broad reach and high impact as possible. Strategies should be consistent with the identified priorities of the grantee and should include or strengthen policy, systems, or environmental improvements, in consultation with CDC subject matter experts. In addition, the delivery of direct services is not within the scope of this announcement.

For example, using REACH funds to develop a system of community health workers (i.e., identify appropriate training for community health workers, set up policies by which workers are hired, create or strengthen referral systems, and work with partners to identify sustained funding for the implementation of the system) would be an appropriate use of funds, as long as REACH funds were not used to pay staff for conducting one-on-one or one-on-small group interventions.

Are joint proposals acceptable? For example, as long as both potential recipients are independently eligible is it acceptable to submit a single application in partnership?

Yes. Funding provided through this FOA is designed to support recipients that will develop and implement comprehensive programs to address health disparities in racial or ethnic groups, through a national or multi-state infrastructure. Applicants submitting a joint proposal must indicate their agreement to work collaboratively to ensure sub-recipients selected for funding are not duplicative.

Also, joint applicants must demonstrate their proposed activities, in combination, will have a high impact and reach large populations of the intervention populations. However, only one organization can be the official applicant and should be identified as such in the application.

Are the Freely Associated States (Federated States of Micronesia, Republic of the Marshall Islands, and the republic of Palau) eligible under this announcement (CDC-RFA-DP12-1209PPHF12)? Also, is the Commonwealth of the Northern Marianas (CNMI) eligible?

Eligible applicants that can apply for this funding opportunity include state and local governments or their Bona Fide Agents (this includes this includes the District of Columbia, the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico, the Virgin Islands, the Commonwealth of the Northern Marianna Islands, American Samoa, Guam, the Federated States of Micronesia, the Republic of the Marshall Islands, and the Republic of Palau).

Can sub-recipients as defined by the FOA be pre-selected and included as part of the grant application?

Yes. Sub-recipients may be pre-selected as part of the application. If they are pre-selected, sub-recipients should be identified in the applicant's proposed budget. If applicants pre-identify a sub-recipient, they must be identified as outlined in the FOA (a national or multi-state network of community-based organizations or associated partner or member organizations). All processes to identify and award funding to sub-recipients should be handled in accordance with the grantee's procurement procedures and CDC's procurement procedures.

Can an organization be both the lead applicant on an application as well as be included as a pre-selected sub-recipient in a different grant application?

Yes. Applicants that meet the eligibility requirements of the FOA are eligible to apply and to be awarded as both a lead applicant and pre-selected sub-recipient, regardless of their previous application status or receipt of a separate CDC funded award. Sub-recipients must be identified in the applicant proposed budget in accordance with the budget guidelines.

May applicants propose projects that address mental health disparities in children that are a risk factor for obesity in young adulthood?

Applicants must link their selected strategies to one or more of the five outcome measures outlined in the FOA: 1) changes in weight, 2) changes in proper nutrition, 3) changes in physical activity, 4) changes in tobacco use prevalence, and 5) changes in emotional well-being and overall mental health. Intervention populations must be selected because of the burden of chronic disease or risk factor selected. Data should be provided in the application that links health disparities with the proposed health condition or risk factors that will be addressed with program activities.

Can I apply to both the REACH FOA, which is award number DP-12-1209PPHF and the REACH Demonstration Project FOA, which is award number DP-12-1217PPHF?

Yes. Organizations may submit applications to both FOAs, but should be able to meet all requirements and restrictions found in the funding opportunity announcements.

If there are multiple groups of disadvantaged populations within our selected geographic area, is it acceptable to propose cross–cutting interventions, for example, interventions that could impact multiple age groups with a specific racial or ethnic group, multiple racial or ethnic groups, or multiple chronic disease conditions?

Yes. More than one racial or ethnic group may be selected and applicants may choose to describe and track one or more specific populations within a given racial or ethnic group, for example specific races or ages. More than one outcome measure or chronic disease condition may be selected. Applicants that select intervention populations with multiple racial or ethnic groups should anticipate that cultural and contextual factors may differ, and propose tailored activities to reflect those differences.

Will proposals that attempt to address multiple disease conditions and social factors be given any advantage?

No scoring advantage will be given to applicants proposing to address multiple disease conditions. All applicants must address at least one of the five outcome measures listed in the FOA: changes in weight, proper nutrition, physical activity, tobacco use, and emotional wellbeing and overall mental health.

Is there a minimum number of people who have to be included in a state, tribe, or territory for it to count?

There is no minimum population size requirement for the selected intervention population. However, grantees must fund 10-15 different sub-recipients, and each sub-recipient should be able to reach at least 75% of the selected intervention population in their geographic area with at least some activities. Additional activities can be more targeted, based on burden and need.

Would it be appropriate for a group to span a mix of states, tribes, and territories? For instance, could a group span the state of Hawaii and two territories, or two western states and a tribe?

Yes, this would be acceptable, as long as all requirements in the FOA were met and the applicant is able to fund 10-15 different sub-recipients across the selected geographic area.

What are the evaluation requirements in this FOA?

There are different types of evaluation activities: performance monitoring required of all grantees, and outcome evaluation of innovative strategies that some grantees might propose. Grantees are required to provide performance monitoring information to CDC for the grantee and each sub-recipient. Grantees must capture key indicators on implementation of activities and lessons learned. This includes the collection of cost data and reporting on demographic characteristics within the selected intervention populations, and measurements of the reach within the selected intervention population. If additional evaluation activities are proposed that build on performance monitoring data, the grantee should develop an evaluation plan, in collaboration with CDC, within 150 days of notice of award.

If the applicant does not have existing sub-recipients, can they create sub-recipients? What level of relationship, formal or informal, defines a network?

Applicants need to demonstrate an ability to access a national or multi-state network of community-based organizations or associated partner or member organizations, and capacity to fund those organizations as sub-recipients. The applicant does not have to have a formal, previously existing network. It is not a requirement that applicants have funded or collaborated with potential sub-recipients in the past. All processes to identify and award funding to sub-recipients should be handled in accordance with the grantee's procurement procedures.

If an organization is planning to serve tribes, can all of the tribes be located within the geographic boundaries of one state?

Yes. The FOA requires the applicant to be able to fund sub-recipient organizations (or tribes) in at least three tribal nations, at least three territories, or at least three states. The FOA emphasizes the need to select strategies that will maximize reach and impact. In addition, the FOA includes a requirement that grantees fund 10-15 different sub-recipients.

Does a sub-recipient need to address the same intervention population, risk factor, AND disease condition as selected by the grantee?

Grantees should fund sub-recipients to conduct implementation work consistent with the grantee's selected intervention population, or populations, selected risk factors, and disease conditions. Grantees should indicate the specific health improvement that will result from this program, tied to one of the five outcome measures: changes in weight, proper nutrition, physical activity, tobacco use, and emotional wellbeing or overall mental health.

Can an applicant focus on two different intervention objectives for different intervention populations, for example: obesity for African Americans and tobacco for Hispanics?

Yes. More than one intervention population, and/or more than one outcome measure may be selected by the applicant. Applicants must demonstrate experience working with the selected intervention populations and knowledge and understanding of appropriate methods to reach and engage the members of that population.

Who is eligible for funding under the REACH FOA?

Eligible applicants that can apply for this funding opportunity include.

  • Nonprofit organizations
  • For-profit organizations
  • Small, minority, and women-owned businesses
  • Universities & colleges
  • Research institutions
  • Hospitals
  • Community-based organizations
  • Faith-based organizations
  • Federally recognized or state-recognized American Indian/Alaska Native tribal governments
  • American Indian/Alaska native tribally designated organizations
  • Alaska Native health corporations
  • Urban Indian health organizations
  • Tribal epidemiology centers
  • State and local governments or their Bona Fide Agents (this includes the District of Columbia, the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico, the Virgin Islands, the Commonwealth of the Northern Marianna Islands, American Samoa, Guam, the Federated States of Micronesia, the Republic of the Marshall Islands, and the Republic of Palau)
  • Political subdivisions of States (in consultation with States)

Will funding be available to build capacity?

No. Applicants should be able to demonstrate a national or multi-state reach through partnership or program activities allowing them to fund local partners. Organizations applying to serve intervention populations within states, tribes, or U.S. territories (regardless of the racial/ethnic group of the intervention population) should be able to reach at least three different states, three different tribal nations, or three different territories.

Funding will be provided to recipients that can function as national or multi-state expert centers focused on the elimination of racial and ethnic health disparities. Specific capacities that are critical to demonstrate are:

  • Successful experience addressing health disparities.
  • Experience working with the selected intervention population(s), including knowledge and understanding of appropriate methods to reach and engage the members of that population.
  • Ability to access a national or multi-state network of community-based organizations, or associated partner/member organizations that work with the selected intervention population(s).
  • Demonstrated capacity to fund local partners or community-based organizations across a national or multi-state geographic area.
  • Ability to support funded local entities to achieve program outcomes, improve health, and reduce health disparities.

Are previous REACH or CTG awardees able to apply?

Applicants that meet the eligibility requirements of the FOA are eligible, regardless of their previous receipt of a separate CTG or REACH award.

However, funds from this FOA may not be used to replace or supplant funding received under any other CDC cooperative agreement. Applicants awarded a REACH cooperative agreement must meet all of the requirements as noted in the FOA.

Is there a preference in this FOA for organizations that have been received funding through REACH programs in the past?

No, this competition is not limited to, nor provides preference for, organizations funded through REACH programs in the past.

Top of Page

Recipient Activities

Can an applicant propose to work with 10 sub-recipients across a National Network comprising partnerships between Mexican Consulates and local US community-based agencies?

The National Network and any selected sub-recipients must meet the requirements set forth in Section I. Funding Opportunity Description and Section III. Eligibility Information. As indicated in the purpose section of the FOA, applicants will fund sub-recipients on a national or multi-state scale. Multi-state is used inclusively to describe U.S. states, tribes, and territories.

Should recipients specify the evidence-based practice interventions that sub-recipients will use before or after the sub-recipient completes their assessment/planning?

Recipients should ensure that sub-recipients develop a local community action plan that includes specific objectives and related milestone activities as well as ensure that a plan is finalized within 60 days of sub-recipient award. In addition, grantees should provide input on plan development and assist sub-recipients in incorporating input from CDC subject matter experts, if provided.

Can a regional primary care association be a sub-recipient on multiple applications as long as the services they provide in the region are to different entities? e.g., PCA provides community health worker training to migrant health centers in one application; and community health worker training to Head Starts in another application?

While a sub-recipient may be identified multiple times through the appropriate mechanisms established by each grantee's procurement procedures, recipients must indicate their willingness to work together to ensure that any sub-recipients selected for funding are not duplicative (i.e., two recipients should not fund sub-recipients in the same community).

If specific sub-recipients are not named in the application, what is the timeframe for securing those sub-recipients after the award?

While there is no timeframe within the FOA for securing sub-recipients, awards should be made quickly in order to allow sub-recipients time to accomplish their activities. A pool of potential sub-recipients (i.e., organizations that the applicant is able to fund) must be identified within the application. If specific organizations are identified in the application as sub-recipients, they will need to be approved by CDC's Procurement and Grants office before any awards are made. Applicants should describe the process that will use to identify and award funding to applicable sub-recipients. In addition, provide any eligibility criteria to identify sub-recipients that will be used as well as indicate willingness to work with other recipients to ensure sub-recipients selected for funding are not duplicative.

Do policy goals need to directly support funding of evidence-based practices around the strategic outcome measures of the FOA (changes in weight, proper nutrition, physical activity, tobacco use, and emotional wellbeing and overall mental health), or is it acceptable develop a policy framework to support funding in these areas?

The purpose of this FOA is support recipients to develop and implement comprehensive evidence-and practice- based strategies to address health disparities in racial or ethnic groups, through a national or multi-state infrastructure. While there may be other methods to support these critical areas, the purpose of this FOA is to fund evidence-and practice -based strategies around the identified outcome measures. In some cases the evidence- and practice-based strategies may take the form of a policy, system, or environmental improvement strategy. Resources affiliated with this FOA can be directed towards educating and informing the public about the most effective evidence- and practice-based strategies.

Successful applicants must comply with the requirements set out in Section 503, Division F, Title V, FY12 Consolidated Appropriations Act and Additional Requirement (AR) 12, which is CDC policy as well as a term and condition of the FOA with respect to lobbying restrictions placed on award recipients.

In addition, please note that grantee activities are not restricted under Section 503 if the grantee is using funding sources other than Federal appropriations to engage in those activities. At the same time, grantee activities may be limited by state law or other applicable restrictions, such as provisions in the Internal Revenue Code. Grantees may wish to consult their tax and/or accounting advisors for assistance.

Part 2 of the FOA describes the recipient activity to "Contribute to the development and implementation of a community health action plan to address chronic disease health disparities." Does this refer to the recipient assisting the CDC with developing a single large report or an action plan that the recipient needs to help each individual grantee with?

The Community Health Action Plan to Address Chronic Disease Health Disparities is a single document that is distinct from the local community action plans to be developed in coordination between recipients and selected sub-recipients. Recipients will assist CDC with the development and implementation of this document. According to the FOA, Section C. Community Health Action Plan to Address Chronic Disease Health Disparities, recipients' specific activities will include:

  1. Supporting plan development including: participating in review sessions of plan contents, writing plan sections, participating in expert panel sessions, and/or other relevant activities as determined by the Division of Community Health.
  2. Supporting plan implementation including the following:

    a. Gathering feedback on the plan
    b. Developing of complementary tools, resources, white papers, or briefs
    c. Developing and providing training (i.e., webinars or in-person meetings)
    d. Disseminating updates and the final plan to the recipient's network

Page 4 of the FOA references "national" as "all 50 states" vs. "multi-state" as "at least 3 states". Could you clarify - with a national approach must work for this occur in all 50 states and if so how is that feasible given p9 information of selecting 10-15 sub-recipients?

An organization with a national reach does not need to fund sub-recipients in all 50 states. Grantees will identify and award funding to 10-15 different sub-recipients, and each sub-recipient should be able to reach at least 75% of the selected intervention population in their geographic area with at least some activities. Sub-recipients will be local partners or community-based organizations in either a multi-state (at least three states) or a national geographic area. This could include a national or multi-state network of community-based organizations or partner/member organizations that work with the intervention population(s) identified in the FOA. If the applicant proposes to serve communities geographically located in the same area as those already funded by CDC's National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion (NCCDPHP), the applicant must describe how funding from the FOA will complement and not duplicate activities funded by CDC. For example, this includes awardees funded by Community Transformation Grants or Communities Putting Prevention to Work programs.

If an applicant elects to work on one health outcome area and one disease area (e.g., tobacco and asthma), will the 10-15 sub-recipients be required to work on both areas? Or could some of the sub-recipients work only on asthma, some only on tobacco, and some on both?

Sub-recipients are required to address the same intervention population, risk factor, AND disease condition as selected by the grantee. In addition, applicants should ensure that sub-recipients are able to reach at least 75% of the select intervention population within the sub-recipient's geographic area with at least some activities.

Will CDC facilitate developing partnerships among new awardees and existing CTG awardees?

Yes. Once awards are made, CDC's involvement will include facilitating connections among other awardees funded through CDC, including CTG.

Will CDC be providing guidance to grantees on the writing and formatting of potential success stories?

Yes. Additional guidance on the writing and formatting of success stories will be available to grantees.

What kinds of activities will organizations funded through the REACH FOA conduct?

All awardees will undertake activities that seek to improve weight, proper nutrition, physical activity, tobacco use, and emotional wellbeing and overall mental health for intervention population(s) experiencing health disparities, selected by the awardee. Awardees may also choose to address one or more of the following: cardiovascular disease, diabetes, breast and cervical cancer, infant mortality, asthma, and child and adult immunization. All recipients should work across sectors to reduce or eliminate barriers that contribute to racial and ethnic health disparities.

Some specific activities include:

  • Identify and award funding to 10–15 local partners or community-based organizations (sub-recipients)
  • Provide management and oversight of sub-recipients and ensure that they implement a comprehensive package of strategies to reduce health disparities in the selected intervention population
  • Support sub-recipients and their local partnership groups by providing specialized technical assistance and expertise related to program activities
  • Document data and information related to performance monitoring and evaluation activities
  • Widely disseminate activities and successes
  • Work with the Division of Community Health on the development and implementation of a Community Health Action Plan to address chronic disease health disparities

Will the REACH FOA pay for direct services for people?

No. Delivery of direct services is not within the scope of this FOA.

Is there a population size requirement for the applicant or associated sub-recipients?

No, there is no specific population size requirement. However, as part of the application content, applicants should provide the estimate of the total number of people reached through sub-recipient activities. The FOA emphasizes the need to select strategies that will maximize population reach and impact, and recipients should ensure that sub-recipients are able to implement at least some activities that reach at least 75% of the selected intervention population in the sub-recipient's geographic area.

Top of Page

Funding and Budget

Are indirect costs spread across total funding or do they have to be extracted from the 25% that can be allocated to the lead/fiduciary organization?

Applicants should apply negotiated indirect cost rates to the total funding amount.

Note that if the applicant requests indirect costs in the budget, a copy of a current approved indirect cost rate agreement by a federal cognizant agency is required to be uploaded as a PDF file with the Application Package on grants.gov. If a prospective recipient does not have a current effective indirect cost rate because it was never established, the organization should contact the Division of Cost Allocation (DCA) (http://rates.psc.gov/), the Division of Financial Advisory Services (DFAS) (http://oamp.od.nih.gov/dfas/faqIndirectCosts.asp), or other knowledgeable agency to determine the need for an indirect cost rate or special rate and the required documentation.

Can departments within our institution be funded as sub-recipients?

No. Departments within the recipient organization cannot be funded as sub-recipients.

The FOA states that: "At least 75% of the proposed budget should be allocated to sub-recipient awards". In the first budget year, can we allocate less than 75% of funding to sub-recipients if the full budget period allocates at least 75% to sub-recipients?

75% of funding must be allocated to sub-recipients in each budget period.

Where can I find budget guidelines for applicants as well as sub-recipients?

Guidance for completing the budget is provided at: http://www.cdc.gov/od/pgo/funding/grants/Budget_Guidelines.doc [DOC–100K]

Can a sub-recipient's travel funding be provided directly to them as part of the 75% required to be given to sub-recipients? Alternatively, can the coverage of the sub-recipient's travel count toward the 75% if provided as direct reimbursement but not part of their sub-grant?

Applicants must include a budget summary indicating at least 75% of the total award is allocated directly to sub-recipients. Coverage of Travel expenses incurred by sub-recipients will be part of this allocation, and not a separate direct reimbursement.

If the grantee intends to utilize the Chronic Disease Program within the state health department to assist with monitoring and evaluation and provision of TA to the sub-recipient communities, can the funds needed to support the state level efforts be included in the 75% funds?

No. The scenario outlined in the question conveys a relationship where the state health department's chronic disease program is a consultant or contractor providing monitoring, evaluation, and technical assistance, and not a sub-recipient community. Therefore, these efforts cannot be funded by 75% being allocated to sub-recipients. According to the FOA, applicants must provide the following information for each contract and/or consultant: (a) name of contractor or consultant, (b) method of selection, (c) period of performance, (d) scope of work, (e) method of accountability, and (f) separate itemized budget with justification.

Are subcontracts to sub-recipients limited to one year as has been the case for the current REACH US CEEDs? Or can subcontracts be executed for multiple years?

The FOA does not specify whether sub-recipients should be funded over the entire project period or newly selected each year. Sub-contracts are not limited to one year and may be executed for multiple years, subject to availability of funding. Grantees have the ability to decide how best to allocate their funding to sub-recipients, within the requirements outlined in the FOA. However, at least ten sub-recipients should be funded in year one. Sub-recipients will need to be approved by CDC's Procurement and Grants Office before any awards are made.

Do all sub-recipients need to receive equal award amounts?

No. Grantees have the ability to decide how best to allocate their funding to sub-recipients, within the requirements outlined in the FOA. Funding to sub-recipients should be handled in accordance with the grantee's procurement policies and CDC's budget guidelines.

Are there requirements related to the funding period for selected sub-recipients? For example, are selected sub-recipients to be funded over the entire five-year project period, assuming federal funding is available? Or will new sub-recipients need to be selected each year?

The FOA does not specify whether sub-recipients should be funded over the entire project period or newly selected each year. Grantees have the ability to decide how best to allocate their funding to sub-recipients, within the requirements outlined in the FOA. However, at least ten sub-recipients should be funded in year one.

For budget purposes, how many required CDC-hosted meetings per year should applicants plan for? Where will they be held?

For budget purposes, plan for a minimum of two meetings, held in Atlanta. Travel budgets may be adjusted after awards are made, if necessary.

What is the funding available for the REACH FOA?

The current fiscal year funding for this FOA is approximately $20 million.

How many awardees will receive awards under this new REACH FOA?

Approximately 6–10 awards will be made.

What will be the average funding award for REACH awardees?

The average award for the 12-month budget period will be approximately $3 million and includes both direct and indirect costs. The smallest award will be approximately $2 million and the largest will be approximately $4 million.

Top of Page

Deadlines and Timelines

The FOA states that the Community Action plan is due 60 days after sub-recipients are awarded and the assessment is due 120 days after award however the assessment is intended to inform the action plan. How should the submitted timeline reflect this?

The submitted application and subsequent timeline should reflect an applicant's and sub-recipients familiarity with the intervention population. With this knowledge of the intervention population, sub-recipients should be able to develop and implement a local community action plan within 60 days of sub-recipient award. The local community action plan should be used to inform the applicant's work plan and overall objectives. In addition, this familiarity with the intervention population should also allow sub-recipients to complete a new or enhance a recent existing community assessment and policy scan within 120 days of sub-recipient award. These assessments should be designed to provide sub-recipients additional detail on where and how to target implementation strategies discussed within the local community action plan. Applicants are responsible for assisting sub-recipients in this process, including encouraging sub-recipients to collaborate and coordinate with their community partners to leverage existing assessments and mutually inform priorities.

Our organization did not register on the Central Contractor Registration (CCR) system before it went down on July 24th. Is it too late to register my organization and apply?

Answer: You may still register your organization using the new System for Award Management (SAM) at www.sam.gov. Failure to completing your registration prior to the application deadline, August 7th, 2012, may result in your application not being accepted in www.grants.gov. Additional information on how to register for the REACH program can be found at https://www.sam.gov/sam/transcript/Quick_Guide_for_Grants_Registrations_v1.7.pdf. [PDF–44K]

When are applications due, and when will awards be announced?

Applications are due on August 7, 2012, 11:59 p.m., Eastern Daylight Savings Time. Awards are expected to be announced by September 30, 2012.

Top of Page

Technical Assistance for Applicants

What is the distinction between Outcome Objectives and Annual Objectives?

As described in Section IV. Application and Submission Information, Outcome Objectives are broad statements of program purpose describing the expected long-term impact of the program. These should be related to the reduction/elimination of health disparities for the intervention population(s). Annual Objectives are measurable changes in supportive policy, system, or environment that affect healthy behavior. Annual Objectives (or one-year objectives) should lead to the accomplishment of associated Outcome Objectives.

How can people ask questions about the REACH FOA and about the REACH initiative?

Information about this initiative can be found at www.cdc.gov/reach/foa/index.htm. This website will provide both a link to frequently asked questions and a submission form for potential applicants to make inquiries. The direct link to the frequently asked questions is. http.//www.cdc.gov/reach/foa/faq/index.htm. The direct link to the question submission form is. http.//www.cdc.gov/reach/submitquestions/index.htm.

Information about all REACH programs, including currently funded awardees, can be found at www.cdc.gov/reach.

For assistance with grant.gov submission difficulties, contact Grants.gov. Contact Center Phone: 1-800-518-4726 Email: support@grants.gov Hours of Operation: 24 hours a day, 7 days a week. Closed on Federal holidays.

Top of Page

Letters of Intent/Application Process

There is a required form SF-LLL, we are a nonprofit and do not lobby. I do not see a place on the form where to state "N/A," how should I complete the form?

All applying organizations are required to submit a completed SF-LLL form whether or not they are a lobbying organization.

How will a grantee know if their LOI was received and/or if they can advance to submitting a full application?

The CDC will send confirmation emails to all applicants who submit an LOI by the deadline date. Organizations who receive such confirmation should proceed with developing their application.
Letters of Intent must have been received by July 11, 2012; 5:00 pm Eastern Daylight Savings Time at the following address:

Deborah Rogers Mercy - DP12-1209PPHF12
Department of Health and Human Services
CDC Procurement and Grants Office
2920 Brandywine Rd, MS E-09
Atlanta, GA 30341

Although a letter of intent is required, it is not binding and does not enter into the review of a subsequent application. The information that it contains allows CDC Program staff to estimate and plan the review of submitted applications.

The LOI must reference: PPHF 12: Racial and Ethnic Approaches to Community Health financed solely by 2012 Prevention and Public Health Funds; CDC-RFA- DP12-1209PPHF12. Please note that electronic submissions via email, fax, CD or thumb drives are NOT ACCEPTABLE.

May some sub-recipients be identified during the application process, or are sub-recipients required to be identified during the award period?

All processes to identify and award funding to sub-recipients should be handled in accordance with the grantee's procurement procedures and CDC's procurement procedures. Potential sub-recipients may be identified on the budget in accordance with the budget guidelines and will need to be approved by CDC's Procurement and Grants Office before any awards are made.

Will applications that focus on mental health and emotional well being be eligible for funding?

One of the five required outcome measures that may be selected is change in mental health and emotional well-being. Applications that focus on this outcome measure are eligible for funding.

Is it acceptable to submit a Letter of Intent (LOI) without submitting an application?

Yes, submitting an LOI does not obligate you to submit an application. However, if an applicant fails to submit an LOI, their application will be considered non-responsive and will not be entered into the review process.

What methods are acceptable for delivery of the Letter of Intent?

CDC will accept Letters of Intent (LOIs) which are submitted via express mail, delivery service, first-class mail, or hand-delivery. The correct CDC address to send LOIs to is found in section 4 of the FOA. All LOIs must be received by CDC by July 11, 2012, 5:00 pm Eastern Daylight Time. Electronic submissions via email, fax, CD or thumbdrives are NOT ACCEPTABLE.

Are the proposals contained in a Letter of Intent (LOI) binding on the applicant? For example, what if the lead fiduciary agency changes as the proposal is developed, or if the population, geographic area, proposed approach, or outcome measures change as the proposal is developed? Will the applicant's application still be accepted if it does not match what was submitted in the LOI?

The proposals in the Letters of Intent (LOI) are not binding. An applicant may change their approach after their LOI has been submitted. However, the lead/fiduciary agent that submitted the LOI is the only applicant that can respond to the FOA with an application.

To whom should letters of support be directed?

Letters of support should be directed to the applicant and reference the specific funding opportunity and specify the role the supporter intends to contribute to the applicant's plan and proposed activities. They can be included as part of the appendices with the application. They should not be sent directly to CDC.

Is a Letter of Intent (LOI) required to apply to the REACH FOA?

Yes. Applicants are required to submit a Letter of Intent (LOI) to be eligible to apply for this program. Failure to submit a LOI will result in non-responsiveness and the applicant will be deemed non-responsive. Electronic submissions via email, fax, CD or thumbdrives are NOT ACCEPTABLE.

When is the LOI due?

CDC's Procurement and Grants Office must receive the Letter of Intent by express mail, delivery service, first-class mail, or hand delivery by 5:00 pm, July 11, 2012, Eastern Daylight Savings Time. See Section IV of the Funding Opportunity Announcement for the CDC address.

What type of review process will occur for this competition?

All eligible applications will be initially reviewed for completeness by the Procurement and Grants Office (PGO) staff. In addition, eligible applications will be jointly reviewed for responsiveness by the National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion and PGO. Incomplete applications and applications that are non-responsive to the eligibility criteria will not advance through the review process. Applicants will be notified the application did not meet eligibility and published submission requirements.

An objective review panel will evaluate complete and responsive applications according to the criteria listed in Section V. Application Review Information, subsection entitled "Evaluation Criteria". The review panel will be conducted by federal employees from within and outside the funding center.

Where are the application review criteria in the FOA?

The application and review process can be found in Section 5 (Section V) of the FOA.

Top of Page

Definitions and Terminology

Does the grantee have to have MOAs with 10-15 sub-recipients or can it have MOAs with 6 who then have multiple MOAs with their sub-recipients?

Grantees should identify and award funding to 10-15 local partners or community-based organizations through appropriate mechanisms established by the grantee's procurement procedures.

Are medically-underserved, non-minority racial and ethnic groups included in FOAs target intervention populations, as health disparities are also evident?

Intervention populations that may be addressed by recipients can include but are not limited to: African American or Black, Hispanic or Latino, American Indian or Alaska Native, Asian American, and Native Hawaiian or Other Pacific Islander. More than one racial or ethnic group may be selected and recipients may also choose to describe and track one or more specific population(s) within a given racial or ethnic group for focused interventions (i.e., Vietnamese American within the broader group of Asian American). Additional factors that contribute to health disparities (such as age, income/education levels, sexual orientation or gender identity, or disability) may be used to describe and focus the intervention population(s).

Please define what activities are considered "direct services."

The FOA states that the emphasis of this program should be on policy, environmental, and systems improvements. Delivery of direct services is not within the scope of this announcement.

To identify whether a programmatic activity is considered a direct service, it may also be useful to evaluate whether the use of funds primarily results in one-on-one or one-on-small group services, or whether the activity results in policy, environmental, or systems improvements.

Funds which are used to directly fund one-on-one or one-on-small group services are likely direct services. For instance, using REACH funds to pay a health worker to provide clinical services to individuals would be considered a direct service. The use of REACH funds to provide incentive payments, or free transportation to individuals for participating in a program would also be considered examples of direct services, and would be an inappropriate use of federal funds under the current FOA.

It is acceptable to use REACH funds to develop policy, systems and environmental improvements. For example, using REACH funds to develop a system of community health workers (i.e., identify appropriate training for community health workers, set up policies by which workers are hired, create or strengthen referral systems, and work with partners to identify sustained funding for the implementation of the system) would be an appropriate use of funds, as long as REACH funds were not used to pay staff for conducting one-on-one or one-on-small group interventions.

Payment of program staff to conduct evaluations of interventions (including baseline and post-intervention assessments) is not considered a direct service.

Applicants are required to demonstrate the ability to access a national or multi-state network of community-based organizations or associated partner/member organizations that work with the selected intervention population(s). What level of relationship (e.g., formal, informal) defines a network?

While applicants are not required to have a formal network, it is necessary to have a relationship that allows applicants to fund, monitor and assist sub-recipients to ensure that evidence-and practice based strategies are used to reach at least 75% of the selected intervention population within the sub-recipient's geographic area with at least some activities. All processes to identify and award funding to sub-recipients should be handled in accordance with the grantee's procurement procedures and CDC's budget guidelines.

REACH CEED grantees fund local organizations and projects through Legacy Grants. Do such relationships meet the FOA's definition for a multi-state network of community-based organizations?

Yes, provided that the local organizations meet the criteria listed in the FOA under Section B: Fund and Manage Sub-Recipients.

Please note that funds from this FOA may not be used to replace or supplant funding received under any other CDC cooperative agreement. Applicants awarded a REACH cooperative agreement must meet all of the requirements as noted in the FOA.

How is community defined in relation to the 75% impact in a selected intervention population?

Each grantee will be responsible for ensuring all sub-recipients can propose and implement at least some strategies that reach at least 75% of the selected intervention population within the sub-recipient's geographic area. The specific geographic area will be defined by the sub-recipient.

Please define "successful experience" as it relates to demonstrating successful experience addressing health disparities.

Strong applicants will be able to provide specific examples that demonstrate the use of their organization's infrastructure to improve the health of the selected intervention populations. Strong applicants will be able to demonstrate reductions in health disparities from their work.

What does the FOA mean when it refers to "including but not limited to" in reference to appropriate racial and ethnic groups that may be affected?

The FOA outlines categories for racial and ethnic populations such as African American, Hispanic or Other Pacific Islander. However, there are a number of groups within those racial and ethnic populations. For example, Cambodian and Vietnamese are both groups within the larger category of Asian Americans that could be selected as a racial or ethnic group.

What are health disparities?

Health disparities represent preventable differences in the burden of disease, disability, injury, or violence, or in opportunities to achieve optimal health. In their plans, recipients will describe the intervention population(s) selected, including relevant health disparities, and how selected interventions will improve health and reduce or eliminate one or more identified health disparities.

What is an intervention population?

An intervention population is the population within the selected geographic area that applicants will reach with proposed program activities.

Top of Page

Other

Should the Work Plan be included in the narrative or as an attachment? Do attachments count towards the 50 page limit for the narrative?

The workplan can be included as an attachment and does not count towards the page limit of the narrative. Attachments do not count towards the 50 page limit for the narrative. No more than a total of ten (10) attachments should be uploaded.

Under staffing, the FOA states that "one program manager full time equivalent (FTE) (staff or contractor) should be proposed for overall accountability of the award." Can you clarify if this means one full time person or if the manager role could be shared between two people so long as the FTE amount equals one?

At least one full time equivalent (FTE) position should be proposed for program management activities, and it is acceptable for two part-time staff members to serve in this role. The program manager role should be filled within 45 days of the award date; however remaining staff can by brought on within 60 days.

Should the applicant submit an evaluation plan? If so, are there guidelines as to what it should cover?

Recipients and sub-recipients are required to provide performance monitoring information to CDC on a quarterly basis through a CDC performance monitoring system. Recipients must capture key indicators on implementation of activities and lessons learned. This includes the collection of cost data and reporting on demographic characteristics within the selected intervention populations, and measurements of the reach within the selected intervention population. If additional evaluation activities are proposed, the grantee should develop an evaluation plan, in collaboration with CDC, within 150 days of notice of award.

CDC will provide guidance on data collection, including strategies to determine cost per person reached for interventions, and guidance and recommendations for applied program evaluation to recipients and sub-recipients conducting additional evaluation activities.


Top of Page

 
Contact Us:
  • Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

    Division of Community Health

    4770 Buford Highway, NE
    MS F-81
    Atlanta, GA 30341-3717
  • 800-CDC-INFO
    (800-232-4636)
    TTY: (888) 232-6348
    8am–8pm
    ET⁄Monday–Friday
    Closed Holidays
  • Contact CDC-INFO
USA.gov: The U.S. Government's Official Web PortalDepartment of Health and Human Services
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention   1600 Clifton Road Atlanta, GA 30329-4027, USA
800-CDC-INFO (800-232-4636) TTY: (888) 232-6348 - Contact CDC–INFO
A-Z Index
  1. A
  2. B
  3. C
  4. D
  5. E
  6. F
  7. G
  8. H
  9. I
  10. J
  11. K
  12. L
  13. M
  14. N
  15. O
  16. P
  17. Q
  18. R
  19. S
  20. T
  21. U
  22. V
  23. W
  24. X
  25. Y
  26. Z
  27. #