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Communities Putting Prevention to Work

Communities Putting Prevention to Work

Logo: Communities Putting Prevention to Work (CPPW)

Communities Putting Prevention to Work (CPPW) supports 50 communities working to reduce obesity and tobacco use—two top preventable causes of death and disability in the United States. is a locally driven initiative supporting 50 communities to tackle obesity and tobacco use—two leading preventable causes of death and disability in the United States.[1]

More than 50 million people live in a city, town, county, or tribal community that benefits from CPPW. That’s 1 out of 6 Americans.

CPPW Makes Healthy Living Easier

Chronic diseases like cancer, diabetes, and heart disease are among the most common and costly of all health problems in the United States. They are also some of the most preventable.

Much of the illness, suffering, and death related to chronic diseases is caused by behaviors that people can change. The most common behaviors that lead to disease are unhealthy eating and lack of physical activity—which can cause obesity—and tobacco use.[2]

To help address these health issues, the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) created CPPW. The program is led by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).

CPPW helps large cities, small towns, rural communities, and tribal areas make environmental changes that make healthy living easier. These changes include:

  • Improving active ways for people to get around safely by walking, biking, and using mass transit.
  • Making sure schools offer healthy food and drink options.
  • Reducing exposure to secondhand smoke.
  • Offering resources to help people stop smoking and using other types of tobacco.

Such efforts will lead to lasting health improvements that have a big impact on these communities.

Check out the CPPW Program Overview to learn more about this important program.

Sources:

  1. Danaei G, Ding EL, Mozaffarian D, Taylor B, Rehm J, Murray CJL, Ezzati M. The Preventable Causes of Death in the United States: Comparative Risk Assessment of Dietary, Lifestyle, and Metabolic Risk Factors. PLoS Med 2009; 6(4): e1000058. Available from: http://www.plosmedicine.org/article/info:doi/10.1371/journal.pmed.1000058
  2. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The Burden of Chronic Diseases and Their Risk Factors: National and State Perspectives 2004. Atlanta: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services; 2004.
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