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Use of Family History Information in Pediatric Primary Care and Public Health

Graphic: Use of Family History Information in Pediatric Primary Care and Public HealthFamily history is an important risk factor for both single-gene disorders and complex common diseases for which genetic causes are poorly understood. Family history information identifies not only shared genetic risks but also shared environmental, behavioral, and cultural factors that can affect risk.

In 2006, CDC convened a workgroup to explore the use of family history information in pediatric primary care and public health. The goals were to assess the current uses of family history information in pediatric settings and to evaluate conditions that could serve as models for using this information in pediatric settings.

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Related Articles

Summary of Workgroup Discussionss

Family History: Practical Considerations for Pediatric Primary Care Clinicians

Linking Family History in Obstetric and Pediatric Care: Assessing Risk for Genetic Disease and Birth Defects

Utility of Family History Reports of Major Birth Defects as a Public Health Strategy

Family History as a Tool for Detecting Children at Risk for Diabetes and Cardiovascular Disease

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