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Preventing Blood Clots After Hip or Knee Replacement Surgery or Surgery for a Broken Hip: A Review of the Research for Adults
This summary covers what research says about the possible benefits and side effects of treatments to help prevent a blood clot after hip or knee surgery. Treatment options include medicines that thin your blood and devices that increase blood flow in your legs (leg or foot coverings that inflate and deflate or elastic stockings). This summary can help you discuss these options with your doctor.

Personal Stories of People Living with Deep Vein Thrombosis and Pulmonary Embolism
The people in this Flickr® album wanted to share their stories of pulmonary embolism and deep vein thrombosis to help us all understand what it’s like to have and survive these conditions.

This Is Serious Campaign
This campaign from the Vascular Disease Foundation and Spirit of Women®, in partnership with the CDC, raises awareness and action around the prevention of DVT and PE in women.

Clot Connect
Clot Connect's mission is to increase knowledge of blood clots and clotting disorders by providing education and support services for patients and health care professionals.

National Blood Clot Alliance
The National Blood Clot Alliance (NBCA) is a patient-led advocacy group dedicated to prevent, diagnose and treat thrombosis and thrombophilia through research, education, support and advocacy.

Venous Disease Coalition
The Venous Disease Coalition (VDC)offers patient and health care provider information to increase awareness on the diagnosis, prevention and treatment of venous diseases.

Blood the Vital Connection (American Society of Hematology)
The American Society of Hematology (ASH) is the world’s largest professional society concerned with the causes and treatments of blood disorders. ASH provides hematologist-approved information on clotting disorders.

National Institutes of Health
The National Institutes of Health (NIH) mission is to employ science in the pursuit of knowledge to improve human health. The National Heart Lung and Blood Institute (NHLBI) is the section of NIH that provides information for professionals and the general public about blood disorders such as deep vein thrombosis.

Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality
The Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality’s (AHRQ) mission is to improve the quality, safety, efficiency, and effectiveness of healthcare for all Americans. This guide from AHRQ describes ways to prevent and treat blood clots; symptoms; and medication side effects as well as when to go to the emergency room.

Surgeon General’s Call to Action to Prevent Deep Vein Thrombosis and Pulmonary Embolism
On September 15, 2008, Acting Surgeon General Steven K. Galson released The Surgeon General’s Call to Action to Prevent Deep Vein Thrombosis and Pulmonary Embolism - 2008 at the Venous Disease Coalition’s Second Annual Meeting.

The North American Thrombosis Forum
The North American Thrombosis Forum (NATF) is a multidisciplinary organization founded with the objective of improving patient care through the advancement of thrombosis education.

CDC Travelers’ Health Yellow Book and DVT/PE
Preventive measures for travelers can be found in CDC’s Travelers’ Health Yellow Book.

Anticoagulation Forum
The Anticoagulation Forum provides information on VTE family-based research.


A chromosome contains a single, long piece of DNA with many different genes. Every human cell contains 23 pairs of chromosomes. There are 22 pairs of numbered chromosomes, called autosomes, and one pair of sex chromosomes, which can be XX or XY. Each pair contains two chromosomes, one from each parent, which means that children get half of their chromosomes from their mother and half from their father.


A gene is a part of DNA that carries the information needed to make a protein. People inherit one copy of each gene from their mother and one copy from their father. The genes that a person inherits from his or her parents can determine many things. For example, genes affect what a person will look like and whether the person might have certain diseases.


DNA is made up of two strands that wind around each other and looks like a twisting ladder. A DNA strand is made up of four different “bases” arranged in different orders. These bases are T (thymine), A (adenine), C (cytosine), and G (guanine). DNA is “read” by the order of the bases, that is by the order of the Ts, Cs, Gs, and As. The specific order, or sequence, of these bases determines the exact information carried in each gene (for example, instructions for making a specific protein). DNA has the same structure in every gene and in almost all living things.


A mutation is a change in a DNA sequence. DNA mutations in a gene can change what protein is made. Mutations present in the eggs and sperm (germline mutations) can be passed on from parent to child, while mutations that occur in body cells (somatic mutations) cannot be inherited.


A protein is made up of building blocks called amino acids. The main role of DNA is to act as the instructions for making proteins. It is actually proteins that make up most of the structures in our bodies and perform most of life’s functions. For example, proteins make up hair and skin. Proteins in our eyes change shape in response to light so we can see. Proteins in our bodies break down food. Proteins are made in cells and are the major parts of cells, which are the vital working units of all living things.


Environmental factors can include exposures related to where we live as well as behaviors such as smoking and exercise and cultural factors such as foods that we eat.

 

Webinar on VTE. November 6, 2014 2-3PM EDT Save the Date. Click here for more info.

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  • Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

    National Center on Birth Defects and Developmental Disabilities

    Division of Blood Disorders

    1600 Clifton Road
    MS E-64
    Atlanta, GA 30333
  • 800-CDC-INFO
    (800-232-4636)
    TTY: (888) 232-6348
  • Contact CDC-INFO
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