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Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report (MMWR): Venous Thromboembolism in Adult Hospitalizations–United States, 2007-2009

 

 Nurse checking patient On June 7, 2012, CDC published in the MMWR a report on adult hospital stays with venous thromboembolism (VTE) in the United States during 2007-2009. Key findings from this report include the following:

  • Each year during 2007 through 2009, an estimated 547,000 hospital stays (some people had more than one hospitalization) had a diagnosis of deep vein thrombosis (DVT), pulmonary embolism (PE), or both types of blood clots:
    • 349,000 included a DVT diagnosis (with or without PE),
    • 278,000 had a PE diagnosis (with or without DVT),
    • 79,000 had both DVT and PE diagnoses listed.

  • The rates of hospitalizations with blood clots were highest among older adults (>60 years age).

  • Almost 29,000 people who were inpatients with a diagnosis of DVT or PE died each year. CDC does not know how many of these people died due to a blood clot rather than some other cause.

  • Deaths can also occur due to undiagnosed PE among other hospital patients.

Hospital patients are at increased risk of blood clots, and many of these events can be avoided. These findings underscore the need to promote strategies to protect hospital patients from blood clots.

View the full report »

 


 

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