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APPENDIX C: Sources of Model and Promising Strategies and Programs

  • Alvarado A, Kendall K, Beesley S, Lee-Cavaness C, eds. Strengthening America's families: model family programs for substance abuse and delinquency prevention. Salt Lake City, UT: University of Utah, Department of Health Promotion and Edu-cation, 2000.
  • CDC. Injury-control recommendations: bicycle helmets. MMWR 1995;44(No. RR-1).
  • CDC. Motor-vehicle occupant injury: strategies for increasing use of child safety seats, increasing use of safety belts, and reducing alcohol-impaired driving---a report on recommendations of the Task Force on Community Preventive Services. MMWR 2001;50(No. RR-7).
  • Coleman P, Munro J, Nicholl JP, Harper R, Kent G, Wild D. The effectiveness of interventions to prevent accidental injury to young persons aged 15--24 years: a review of the evidence. Sheffield, England: Medical Care Research Unit, University of Sheffield, 1996.
  • Dinh-Zarr TB, Sleet DA, Shults RA, et al. Reviews of evidence regarding interventions to increase use of safety belts. Am J Prev Med 2001;21(suppl 1):48--65.
  • Elliot DS, ed. Blueprints for violence prevention. Boulder, CO: Center for the Study and Prevention of Violence, Institute for Behavioral Sciences, University of Colorado at Boulder, 1998. Available at <http://www.colorado.edu/cspv/blueprints>. Accessed August 7, 2001.
  • Harborview Medical Center Injury Prevention and Research Center. Systematic reviews of childhood injury prevention interventions. Seattle, WA: Harborview Medical Center Injury Prevention and Research Center, University of Washington, 2000. Available at <http://depts.washington.edu/hiprc/childinjury>. Accessed August 7, 2001.
  • Howell JC, ed. Guide for implementing the comprehensive strategy for serious, violent, and chronic juvenile offenders. Washington, DC: US Department of Justice, Office of Justice Programs, Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention, 1995; publication no. 153681. Available at <http://www.ncjrs.org/pdffiles/guide.pdf> Accessed November 13, 2001.
  • Howell JC, Krisberg B, Hawkins JD, Wilson JJ, eds. A sourcebook: serious, violent, and chronic juvenile offenders. Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage Publications, 1995.
  • Lonero LP, Clinton K, Wilde GJS, et al. In search of safer roads: what works in changing road user behaviour. Ontario, Canada: Ministry of Transportation,
  • Safety and Regulation Division, Safety Research Office, Safety Policy Branch, 1995; publication no. SRO-95-102.
  • Mendel RA. Less hype, more help: reducing juvenile crime, what works---and what doesn't. Washington, DC: American Youth Policy Forum, 2000.
  • National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, CDC, Federal Highway Administration. National strategies for advancing bicycle safety. Washington, DC: US Department of Transportation, National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, 2001.
  • Rivara FP, MacKenzie EJ, eds. Systematic reviews of strategies to prevent motor vehicle injuries. Am J Prev Med 1999;16(1S):1--89.
  • Schieber RA, Gilchrist J, Sleet DA. Legislative and regulatory strategies to reduce childhood injuries. Future Child 2000;10:111--36.
  • Schieber RA, Vegega ME, eds. National strategies for advancing child pedestrian safety. Atlanta, GA: CDC, National Center for Injury Prevention and Control, 2001.
  • Sherman LW, Gottfredson D, MacKenzie D, et al. Preventing crime: what works, what doesn't, what's promising. Washington, DC: US Department of Justice, Office of Justice Programs, 1997.
  • Shults RA, Elder RW, Sleet DA, et al. Review of evidence regarding interventions to reduce alcohol-impaired driving. Am J Prev Med 2001;21(suppl 1):66--88.
  • State and Territorial Injury Prevention Directors' Association. Innovative strategies to prevent residential fire-related injuries. Presented at the Strategies to Prevent Residential Fire-Related Injuries meeting: Amsterdam, The Netherlands. Marietta, GA: State and Territorial Injury Prevention Directors' Association, May 21, 1998.
  • Thornton TN, Craft CA, Dahlberg LL, Lynch BS, Baer K. Best practices of youth violence prevention: a sourcebook for community action. Atlanta, GA: CDC, National Center for Injury Prevention and Control, 2000.
  • Towner E, Dowswell T, Jarvis S. Updating the evidence: a systematic review of what works in preventing childhood unintentional injuries---part 1. Inj Prev 2001;7:161--4.
  • Towner E, Dowswell T, Mackereth C, Jarvis S. What works in preventing unintentional injuries in children and young adolescents? an updated systematic review. London, England: Health Development Agency, 2001. Available at <http:// www.hda-online.org.uk/downloads/pdfs/prevent_injuries.pdf>. Accessed August 7, 2001.
  • US Department of Education. Safe, Disciplined, and Drug Free Schools Expert Panel. Washington, DC: US Department of Education, Safe and Drug Free Schools Program, 2000. Available at <http://www.ed.gov/offices/OERI/ORAD/KAD/expert_panel/drugfree.html>. Accessed August 7, 2001.
  • US Departments of Education and Justice. 1999 Annual report on school safety. Washington, DC: US Department of Education, Safe and Drug Free School Program, 1999.
  • US Department of Health and Human Services. Youth violence: a report of the Surgeon General. Rockville, MD: US Department of Health and Human Services, CDC, National Center for Injury Prevention and Control; National Institutes of Health, National Institute of Mental Health; Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, Center for Mental Health Services, 2001.
  • Zaza S, Sleet DA, Thompson RS, Sosin DM, Bolen JC, Task Force on Community Preventive Services. Reviews of evidence regarding interventions to increase use of child safety seats. Am J Prev Med 2001;21(suppl 1):31--47.

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