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Announcements: Recreational Water Illness Prevention Week --- May 24--30, 2010

Although swimming is a physical activity that offers numerous health benefits (1), recreational water (e.g., water in pools) can also transmit pathogens that cause illness. May 24--30 marks the sixth annual National Recreational Water Illness Prevention Week. The goal of this observance is to highlight simple steps that swimmers and pool operators can take to reduce health and safety risks to swimmers.

Recreational water illnesses are transmitted by ingesting, breathing in the mists or aerosols of, or having contact with contaminated water in pools, water parks, interactive fountains, water play areas, hot tubs, lakes, rivers, springs, ponds, streams, and oceans. During 2005--2006, recreational water illness outbreaks affected 4,412 persons, resulting in 116 hospitalizations and five deaths (2). This year, Recreational Water Illness Prevention Week focuses on the importance of pool inspections and encourages swimmers to follow the Triple A's of Healthy Swimming (awareness, action, and advocacy).*

References

  1. Chase NL, Sui X, Blair SN. Swimming and all-cause mortality risk compared with running, walking, and sedentary habits in men. International Journal of Aquatic Research and Education 2008;2:213--23.
  2. CDC. Surveillance for waterborne disease and outbreaks associated with recreational water use and other aquatic facility-associated health events---United States 2005--2006. MMWR 2008;57(No. SS-9):1--33.


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**Questions or messages regarding errors in formatting should be addressed to mmwrq@cdc.gov.

 
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