Skip Navigation LinksSkip Navigation Links
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
Safer Healthier People
Blue White
Blue White
bottom curve
CDC Home Search Health Topics A-Z spacer spacer
spacer
Blue curve MMWR spacer
spacer
spacer


The content, links, and pdfs are no longer maintained and might be outdated.

  • The content on this page is being archived for historic and reference purposes only.
  • For current, updated information see the MMWR website.

QuickStats: Late Preterm Birth Rates,* by Plurality --- United States, 1990, 2000, and 2006

The figure shows late preterm birth rates, by plurality in the United States for the years: 1990, 2000, and 2006. During 1990-2006, most of the increase in overall preterm birth rates was attributed to late preterm births. During this period, the late preterm birth rate for singleton births increased 19%, from 6.8% to 8.1%; the late preterm birth rate for multiple births increased 30%, from 29.3% to 38.1%. In 2006, multiple births were nearly four times more likely to occur late preterm than singleton births. Although at less risk than infants born before 34 weeks' gestation, late preterm infants are at higher risk than those born at term (i.e., at 39-41 weeks' gestation) for complications at birth, long-term neurodevelopmental problems, and death in the first year of life.

* Births at 34--36 completed weeks' gestation per 100 total births.

During 1990--2006, most of the increase in overall preterm birth rates was attributed to late preterm births. During this period, the late preterm birth rate for singleton births increased 19%, from 6.8% to 8.1%; the late preterm birth rate for multiple births increased 30%, from 29.3% to 38.1%. In 2006, multiple births were nearly four times more likely to occur late preterm than singleton births. Although at less risk than infants born before 34 weeks' gestation, late preterm infants are at higher risk than those born at term (i.e., at 39--41 weeks' gestation) for complications at birth, long-term neurodevelopmental problems, and death in the first year of life.

SOURCES: Martin JA, Kirmeyer S, Osterman M, Sheperd RA. Born a bit too early: recent trends in late preterm births. NCHS data brief, no 24. Hyattsville, MD: US Department of Health and Human Services, National Center for Health Statistics; 2009. Available at http://www.cdc.gov/nchs/data/databriefs/db24.pdf. Accessed January 5, 2010.

National Vital Statistics System. Annual natality files. Available at http://www.cdc.gov/nchs/births.htm.

Alternate Text: The figure above shows late preterm birth rates, by plurality in the United States for the years: 1990, 2000, and 2006. During 1990-2006, most of the increase in overall preterm birth rates was attributed to late preterm births. During this period, the late preterm birth rate for singleton births increased 19%, from 6.8% to 8.1%; the late preterm birth rate for multiple births increased 30%, from 29.3% to 38.1%. In 2006, multiple births were nearly four times more likely to occur late preterm than singleton births. Although at less risk than infants born before 34 weeks' gestation, late preterm infants are at higher risk than those born at term (i.e., at 39-41 weeks' gestation) for complications at birth, long-term neurodevelopmental problems, and death in the first year of life.

Use of trade names and commercial sources is for identification only and does not imply endorsement by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.


References to non-CDC sites on the Internet are provided as a service to MMWR readers and do not constitute or imply endorsement of these organizations or their programs by CDC or the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. CDC is not responsible for the content of pages found at these sites. URL addresses listed in MMWR were current as of the date of publication.

All MMWR HTML versions of articles are electronic conversions from typeset documents. This conversion might result in character translation or format errors in the HTML version. Users are referred to the electronic PDF version (http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr) and/or the original MMWR paper copy for printable versions of official text, figures, and tables. An original paper copy of this issue can be obtained from the Superintendent of Documents, U.S. Government Printing Office (GPO), Washington, DC 20402-9371; telephone: (202) 512-1800. Contact GPO for current prices.

**Questions or messages regarding errors in formatting should be addressed to mmwrq@cdc.gov.

Date last reviewed: 1/6/2010

HOME  |  ABOUT MMWR  |  MMWR SEARCH  |  DOWNLOADS  |  RSSCONTACT
POLICY  |  DISCLAIMER  |  ACCESSIBILITY

Safer, Healthier People

Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
1600 Clifton Rd, MailStop E-90, Atlanta, GA 30333, U.S.A

USA.GovDHHS

Department of Health
and Human Services