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CDC resumes weekly flu activity reports

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This website is archived for historical purposes and is no longer being maintained or updated.

Media Statement

For Immediate Release: Friday, October 30, 2015
Contact: Media Relations, Office of Communication
(404) 639-3286

Information about influenza activity in the United States is collected, compiled and analyzed by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and published in a report called FluView. CDC has resumed full FluView reporting for the 2015-2016 U.S. flu season and has made a number of refinements to the report this season.

FluView includes information on:

  • when and where influenza activity is occurring in the United States,
  • what influenza viruses are circulating, and
  • the impact of influenza disease in the United States, including flu-related illness, hospitalizations and deaths.

FluView is available in a downloadable PDF report, but the information also is available in interactive applications (FluView Interactive), which allow users to create and customize dynamic visuals.

This season, a number of refinements have been made to FluView including:

  • Differentiating data provided by public health and clinical laboratories,
  • Providing lineage for influenza B virus data,
  • Displaying graphically the age distribution of influenza-positive specimens,
  • Transitioning to the National Center for Health Statistics electronic mortality surveillance system, which provides a more complete and accurate assessment of deaths from flu.

Subscribe to the FluView RSS feed for updates and news. The reports are posted weekly on Fridays.

Additional Information

  • Influenza activity is low at this time, but there are early signs that activity is increasing.
  • CDC recommends that everyone six months of age and older get vaccinated against influenza every year.
  • Influenza viruses are constantly changing so the composition of the seasonal influenza vaccine is reviewed annually and updated periodically to better match circulating viruses.
  • The composition of the 2015-2016 season’s influenza vaccine has been updated to better match circulating influenza viruses.
  • Laboratory data indicate that most circulating influenza viruses remain similar to the influenza viruses used to make this season’s vaccines; this suggests that vaccination should protect against most circulating influenza viruses.
  • As of October 30, 2015, more than 118 million doses of 2015-2016 flu vaccine have been distributed.
  • Learn more about flu at www.cdc.gov/flu and more about vaccines at Vaccines.gov.

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U.S. DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES

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