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Surveillance Summaries
July 7, 2000/Vol. 49/No. SS-6

Contact: Deborah Holtzman, Ph.D.
CDC, National Center for Chronic Disease
Prevention & Health Promotion
(770) 4882455

State-and Sex-Specific Prevalence of Selected Characteristics Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, 1996 and 1997

This report presents the prevalence of health risk behaviors, health conditions, and preventive health practices among US adults, by state and by gender for 1996 and 1997. The data are from the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS), a state-based telephone survey of the adult population. The data show that adults engage in a number of behaviors that are detrimental to their health, but at the same time, many adults are making efforts to prevent chronic disease and injury. We not only found state differences in the prevalence of certain health behaviors and practices, but differences by gender. These data are useful in developing and guiding public health programs and policies and are vital for effective decision-making at the state level. States can use these data to help prevent premature morbidity and mortality and to assess progress toward achieving state and national health objectives


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