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Fact Sheet

November 6, 2003  

Prevalence of Self-Reported Heart Disease and Stroke Among U.S. Adults With and Without Diabetes

Diabetes is a serious disease that frequently leads to complications such as heart disease and stroke the first and third leading causes of death in the United States. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention analyzed data from the 1999-2001 National Health Interview Survey and found that cardiovascular diseases such as heart disease and stroke continue to be major risk factors for people with diabetes.

  • Adults with diabetes have a death rate from heart disease and stroke that is two to four times that of adults without diabetes.
     
  • The prevalence of heart disease and stroke is approximately two to four times greater among adults with diabetes compared to those without diabetes. For instance:
     
    • 25 percent of adults with diabetes compared to 7 percent of adults without diabetes reported having coronary heart disease.
    • 9 percent compared to 3 percent reported having had a stroke.
    • 18 percent compared to 8 percent reported having some other heart condition.
    • 37 percent compared to 14 percent reported having at least one of these conditions.
       
  • The differences between adults with and without diabetes became more pronounced with age. Adults aged 35 to 64 years with diabetes were five times more likely to report a history of coronary heart disease or stroke, twice as likely to report another heart condition and three times more likely to report at least one of these conditions.
     
  • After adjusting for age, more men than women (26 percent compared to 19 percent) with diabetes reported having coronary heart disease than men and women without diabetes (9 percent compared to 5 percent).
     
  • After adjusting for age, more blacks with and without diabetes (11 percent compared to 4 percent) reported having had a stroke than either whites (8 percent compared to 3 percent) or Hispanics (8 percent compared to 2 percent).

Diabetes is often preventable. Results from the Diabetes Prevention Program clinical trials indicated that with improved diet, modest weight loss, and increased physical activity, diabetes can be prevented or delayed among adults at high risk of developing the disease.

To see the latest report, please visit http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/preview/mmwrhtml/mm5244a2.htm.

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This page last updated November 6, 2003
URL: http://www.cdc.gov/media/pressrel/fs031106.htm

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