Skip directly to search Skip directly to A to Z list Skip directly to navigation Skip directly to site content Skip directly to page options
CDC Home

This page is a historical archive and is no longer maintained.

For current information, please visit

Media Advisory

For Immediate Release: September 5, 2008
Contact: Division of News & Electronic Media, Office of Communication
(404) 639-3286

CDC Offers Checklist for People in Path of Upcoming Hurricanes

Before the storm:

  • If evacuating, pack an emergency supply kit with food, bottled water, prescription medicines, and important documents.
  • If you plan to drive, fill your gas tank as soon as possible.
  • Turn off gas, electricity, and water, and disconnect appliances before leaving.
  • Take steps to ensure your pets’ safety during the storm.
  • Follow designated evacuation routes for your area, and expect heavy traffic.

If you stay home during the storm:

  • Pack an emergency supply kit with necessities such as food, bottled water, and prescription medicines to last from three to five days.
  • Determine the best escape routes from your home, and make sure that everyone in your house is able to follow the escape plan.
  • Look for escape routes from upper levels of the house, in case of flooding.
  • Do not go outside, even if the weather seems calm. Wait for local authorities to tell you it is safe to go outside.
  • If your home is flooded or damaged, move to a neighbor's or a local shelter.

After the storm:

  • Do not drive through flooded roads, as cars can be swept away or lose power.
  • NEVER touch a downed power line or anything in contact with one.
  • Turn off electrical power when there are hazards around your home such as standing water, fallen power lines, or gas leaks.
  • Listen to announcements in local media (radio, television or newspaper) to find out if it’s safe to use tap water, and follow instructions regarding water.
  • If you are not sure if water is safe to use, boil water before you use it for anything, including brushing teeth, cooking, drinking, or bathing.
  • Throw away any food that may have been touched by floodwater.
  • Use battery-powered lanterns and flashlights, instead of candles, to prevent fires.
  • Stoves, generators, lanterns, and gas ranges release dangerous carbon monoxide gas and should always be used outdoors, far away from windows, doors and vents.


Important instructions:

If you would like to ask a question during the call, press *1 on your touchtone phone. Press *2 to withdraw your question. You may queue up at any time. You will hear a tone to indicate your question is pending.

Listen-Only Audio Webcast

This media availability will also available via listen-only audio web cast at


A transcript of this media availability will be available following the briefing at the CDC web site at


CDC 24/7 – Saving Lives. Protecting People. Saving Money Through Prevention. Learn More About How CDC Works For You…
Contact Us:
  • Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
    1600 Clifton Rd
    Atlanta, GA 30333
  • 800-CDC-INFO
    TTY: (888) 232-6348
  • Contact CDC-INFO The U.S. Government's Official Web PortalDepartment of Health and Human Services
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention   1600 Clifton Road Atlanta, GA 30329-4027, USA
800-CDC-INFO (800-232-4636) TTY: (888) 232-6348 - Contact CDC–INFO
A-Z Index
  1. A
  2. B
  3. C
  4. D
  5. E
  6. F
  7. G
  8. H
  9. I
  10. J
  11. K
  12. L
  13. M
  14. N
  15. O
  16. P
  17. Q
  18. R
  19. S
  20. T
  21. U
  22. V
  23. W
  24. X
  25. Y
  26. Z
  27. #