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MMWR – Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report

MMWR News Synopsis for January 24, 2013

  1. Reported Foodborne Disease Outbreaks — United States, 2009––2010
  2. Progress in Immunization Information Systems — United States, 2011
  3. Infant Meningococcal Vaccination: ACIP Recommendations and Rationale

New Feature: CDC's Division of News and Electronic Media will be periodically providing recorded video clips on MMWR articles from CDC Director Dr. Tom Frieden. Please look for these links next to the stories listed below.

No MMWR telebriefing scheduled for January 24, 2013.

1. Reported Foodborne Disease Outbreaks — United States, 2009––2010

CDC
Division of News & Electronic Media
404-639-3286

Surveillance for foodborne disease outbreaks can identify opportunities to prevent some of the millions of foodborne illnesses in the United States each year. During 2009-10, health department officials reported 1,527 foodborne disease outbreaks that resulted in 29,444 illnesses, 1,184 hospitalizations, and 23 deaths. Most outbreak-associated illnesses were caused by norovirus or Salmonella. Among outbreaks in which both a pathogen and single-commodity food vehicle were identified, Campylobacter in unpasteurized dairy products, Salmonella in eggs, and E. coli O157 in beef caused the most outbreaks. The pathogen-commodity pairs responsible for the most outbreak-related illnesses were Salmonella in eggs, Salmonella in sprouts, and Salmonella in vine-stalk vegetables such as tomatoes and peppers. Most foodborne illnesses are preventable. Timely investigation and reporting of foodborne outbreaks can provide information that may help to reduce foodborne illnesses.

2. Progress in Immunization Information Systems — United States, 2011

CDC
Division of News & Electronic Media
404-639-3286

Immunization information systems (IIS) are computerized systems that consolidate vaccination data, and are a proven tool to increase vaccination rates.  An annual survey of immunization programs shows 84 percent of U.S. children <6 years of age have immunization information in IIS, up from 82 percent in 2010.  Complete and accurate data in IIS ensures providers have comprehensive immunization histories for the children they serve. As part of an ongoing effort to improve information entered in IIS, a two-dimensional (2D) vaccine barcode project is currently underway. 2D barcodes allow providers to scan vaccine product information, expiration date, and lot number from vaccines to populate electronic health records and IIS. 2D barcodes have the potential to improve data quality in IIS and improve patient safety. Widespread adoption of 2D vaccine barcoding among manufacturers and immunization providers has the potential to increase completeness and accuracy of IIS data and improve patient safety.

3. Infant Meningococcal Vaccination: ACIP Recommendations and Rationale

CDC
Division of News & Electronic Media
404-639-3286

While this vaccine can be used to complete the recommended Hib vaccine series in any infant, only infants who are at increased risk for meningococcal disease are recommended to receive this vaccine routinely. In October, 2012, the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices recommended infants at increased risk for meningococcal disease be vaccinated with HibMenCY, a vaccine that protects against Hib and meningococcal disease caused by serogroups C and Y. This includes children with functional or anatomic asplenia and children with certain problems with their immune systems

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