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MMWR – Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report

MMWR News Synopsis for January 17, 2013

  1. Obesity Prevalence Among Low Income Preschool Children — New York City and Los Angeles County, 2003–2011
  2. Interruptions in Supplies of Second-Line Anti-Tuberculosis Drugs — United States, 2005–2012
  3. Global Control and Regional Elimination of Measles, 2000–2011

New Feature: CDC's Division of News and Electronic Media will be periodically providing recorded video clips on MMWR articles from CDC Director Dr. Tom Frieden. Please look for these links next to the stories listed below.

No MMWR telebriefing scheduled for January 17, 2013.

1. Obesity Prevalence Among Low Income Preschool Children — New York City and Los Angeles County, 2003–2011

Click here to get broadcast quality video of CDC Director Dr. Tom Frieden

Jackson Sekhobo, PhD, MPA, Director of Research and Evaluation
Division of Nutrition, New York State Department of Health
Office: 518 402-7109
Email: jps04@health.state.ny.us.

This study compares annual childhood obesity prevalence among WIC-enrolled 3- and 4-year old children in Los Angeles County and New York City from 2003-2011.  The results of the study show that prevalence of childhood obesity among children enrolled in WIC in NYC declined among all groups except non-Hispanic Asians during the 9 years, while in LAC, prevalence among all groups except non-Hispanic Asians increased markedly during 2003-2008 and then declined after 2009.    These patterns are consistent with national trends indicating that obesity prevalence increases among preschool and school-age children have leveled off and with local reports of disparities in declines in childhood obesity in different parts of the country. Comparisons of obesity prevalence trends across cities and states provide the opportunity for identifying interventions and policies that may be contributing to the reversal of the childhood obesity epidemic in different segments of the US population. 

2. Interruptions in Supplies of Second-Line Anti-Tuberculosis Drugs — United States, 2005–2012

National Center for HIV/AIDS, Viral Hepatitis, STD, and TB Prevention
News Media Line – 404-639-8895
NCHHSTPMediaTeam@cdc.gov

A nationwide survey of TB programs found that the majority of programs reporting multidrug resistant (MDR) TB also have difficulty in obtaining the drugs needed to treat it.  In comparison to drug-susceptible TB, treatment of drug-resistant TB requires a lengthy regimen with additional drugs that are less effective, more toxic, and more expensive.  A survey conducted by the National TB Controllers Association found that 81 percent of TB programs that responded to the survey and reported MDR TB also reported difficulties in obtaining the drugs needed to treat drug-resistant cases of TB.  Among programs reporting these difficulties, the following reasons were cited: nationwide shortages (cited by 100 percent of those programs), shipping delays (71 percent), lack of resources (62 percent), and the complicated process related to protocols needed to obtain certain drugs (48 percent).  As a result, many programs also reported adverse outcomes or other problems treating these patients, including treatment delay (58 percent), treatment lapse or interruption (32 percent), and use of an inadequate – and potentially less effective – regimen (32 percent).  These shortages must be addressed, as consequences of such drug shortages can be severe and have a serious impact on both patient health and public health; these shortages interfere with care and potentially promote the development and transmission of resistance.

3. Global Control and Regional Elimination of Measles, 2000–2011

Click here to get broadcast quality video of CDC Director Dr. Tom Frieden

CDC
Division of News & Electronic Media
404-639-3286

In 2010, the World Health Assembly established three milestones towards the future eradication of measles to be achieved by 2015: 1) increase routine coverage with the first dose of measles-containing vaccine (MCV1) for children aged 1 year to ≥90 percent nationally and ≥80 percent in every district or equivalent administrative unit; 2) reduce and maintain annual measles incidence to <5 cases per million; and 3) reduce measles mortality by >95 percent from the 2000 estimate. During 2000–2011, global MCV1 coverage increased from 72 percent to 84 percent and the number of countries providing a second dose of measles-containing vaccine (MCV2) through routine services increased from 97 (50 percent) in 2000 to 141 (73 percent) in 2011. During 2000-2011, annual measles incidence decreased 65 percent from 146 to 52 cases per million population and estimated measles deaths decreased 71 percent from 542,000 to 158,000.  During 2010-2011, global measles incidence increased and large outbreaks of measles were reported in multiple countries. To resume progress toward achieving regional measles elimination targets, national governments and partners are urged to ensure that measles elimination efforts receive high priority and adequate resources.

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