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MMWR

Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report

1. Prevalence of Abnormal Lipid Levels Among Youths — United States, 1999–2006

Press Contact: CDC
Division of Media Relations
(404) 639-3286

Youths in the United States are at substantial risk for two important problems that frequently overlap: abnormal lipid levels and obesity. Those who are obese are more likely to have abnormal lipid levels and having one or both problems will place youths at greater risk for heart disease in adulthood. According to a national survey conducted by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), 20 percent of American youths (age 12- 19 years) have at least one abnormal lipid level. The lipids of interest were low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C), high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C), and triglycerides. The prevalence of abnormal lipid levels was even higher among overweight (22 percent) and obese youths (43 percent). This finding is of great concern because abnormal lipids levels constitute an important risk factor for heart disease, the leading cause of death among U.S. adults. Screening of youths for abnormal lipid levels can identify those youths who might benefit from interventions that reduce the risk for CVD such dietary changes, weight management, and physical activity. Given the obesity epidemic among youths, clinicians should be aware of lipid screening guidelines and recommended interventions especially for overweight and obese youths.

2. Transfusion-Related Transmission of Yellow Fever Vaccine Virus — California, 2009

Press Contacts: Michael T. Wiener
Deputy Public Affairs Officer, Naval medical Center San Diego
(619) 532-9380

Lola Russell
Division of Media Relations 
(404) 639-3286

This investigation provides evidence that yellow fever vaccine virus can be transmitted by blood products. Yellow fever (YF) vaccine is recommended for travelers visiting YF areas. The American Red Cross asks that people who received the vaccine do not donate blood for 2 weeks because of a potential risk of the vaccine virus being passed through blood products. This report details an investigation of five patients who were unintentionally exposed to blood products donated by people who were recently vaccinated for YF. None of the blood product recipients had an adverse reaction. However, three recipients showed evidence of an immune response to YF vaccine virus. These findings suggest that YF vaccine virus can be transmitted by blood products and underscores the need to defer people recently vaccinated with YF vaccine from donating blood

3. Update: Influenza Activity — United States, August 30, 2009–January 9, 2010

Press Contact: CDC
Division of Media Relations
(404) 639-3286

Although influenza activity has declined in recent weeks, increased influenza activity from 2009 H1N1 viruses, seasonal influenza viruses, or both, might occur in the remainder of the influenza season and most jurisdictions are encouraging vaccination of all persons aged more than 6 months. As of January 9, 2010, the majority of influenza activity this season has been due to 2009 H1N1. Activity was highest during the week ending October 24, 2009 and has since declined. Rates of influenza-related hospitalizations and deaths among those younger than 65 years during this season have been substantially higher than in recent influenza seasons. In January and February, seasonal influenza activity usually increases; thus, increased influenza activity from 2009 H1N1 viruses, seasonal influenza viruses, or both might occur in the remainder of the influenza season. Although limited supplies of the influenza A (H1N1) 2009 vaccine had previously necessitated prioritizing vaccination among certain groups, vaccine availability has increased to over 130 million doses, and most jurisdictions are encouraging vaccination of all persons aged >6 months.

4. Previously Released: Influenza A (H1N1) 2009 Monovalent Vaccination Coverage — United States, October–December 2009

Press Contact: CDC
Division of Media Relations
(404) 639-3286

No summary available.

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U.S. DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES

  • Historical Document: January 21, 2010
  • Content source: Office of Enterprise Communication
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