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Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report

Trends in Childhood Cancer Mortality — United States, 1990–2004

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National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion
Office of Communications
(770) 488–5131

The good news is that childhood cancer rates are decreasing in the U.S. However, disparities continue to exist in several geographic regions and among racial/ethnic populations. More research is needed to understand geographic and ethnic disparities in childhood cancer death. Future cancer prevention and intervention efforts should be made to reach high–risk and underserved populations. Overall, childhood cancer death rates decreased significantly reducing from 34.2 percent in 1990 to 27.3 percent in 2004. The study also showed significant declines by demographics among boys and girls, children (0–14 years) and adolescents (15–19 years), Hispanics and non-Hispanics, most racial groups with the exception of American Indians/Alaska Natives, and all geographic regions. However, death rates did not decrease equally in all regions. They were 2.1 percent per year for the Midwest, 1.8 percent per year for the South and Northeast; and, only 1.4 percent per year for the West. The annual percentage change in death rates differed by 60 percent between Hispanics (1.0 percent) and non–Hispanics (1.6 percent).

Travel-Associated Legionnaires Disease Surveillance — United States, 2005–2006

PRESS CONTACT: CDC
Division of Media Relations
(404) 639–3286

Clinicians should take a travel history on patients suspected of having Legionnaires′ disease and report cases to state Health departments who should report all cases travel–associated of Legionnaires′ disease to CDC within 7 days of notification. Travel–associated Legionnaires′ disease, a serious respiratory disease, is under–reported in the United States. And the Center for Disease Control and Prevention is trying to improve reporting by encouraging state health departments to follow the Council for State and Territorial Epidemiologists′ recommendations on timely reporting of Legionnaires′ disease. Rapid reporting of cases can lead to earlier detection and is more likely to lead to rapid identification of a source and to expedite prevention measures.

Respiratory Syncytial Virus Activity – United States, July 2006–November 2007

PRESS CONTACT: CDC
Division of Media Relations
(404) 639–3286

As of November 24, 2007, the 2007–2008 RSV season has started in the South (excluding Florida), Northeast, and Florida. Last year′s RSV season varied widely by geographic location, occurring from late October to late February in the South (excluding Florida); mid–November to mid–February in the Northeast; mid–November to mid–March in the Midwest; mid–December to late March in the West; and early July to late January in Florida. Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) causes approximately 75,000–125,000 hospitalizations in the United States each year, primarily because of bronchiolitis or pneumonia. In this report, we summarize RSV temporal and geographic trends in the United States for the July 2006––June 2007 season and for the first five months of the current season, July––November 2007, using reports from the National Respiratory and Enteric Virus Surveillance System (NREVSS). The 2006-2007 national RSV season occurred from mid–November to mid–March. The RSV season varied by geographic location in 2006–2007: late October to late February in the South (excluding Florida); mid–November to mid–February in the Northeast; mid–November to mid–March in the Midwest; mid–December to late March in the West; and early July to late January in Florida. As of November 24, 2007, reports indicate that the 2007–2008 RSV season has started in the South (excluding Florida), Northeast, and Florida. Appropriately timed diagnostic tests can provide data that indicate when the RSV season begins nationally and regionally, information that has been critical in determining when to begin RSV prophylaxis for infants and children at high risk for infection.

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U.S. DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES

  • Historical Document: December 6, 2007
  • Content source: Office of Enterprise Communication
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