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Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report

State-Specific Vaccination Coverage Among Adults Aged >18 Years — United States, 2003–04 and 2005–06 Influenza Seasons

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Influenza vaccination rates in the 2005–06 season are not as high as they were before the vaccine shortage of 2004–05. Based on the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS) survey, in the 2005-06 season, influenza vaccination coverage among persons aged 18-49 years with high-risk conditions, persons aged 50-64 years, and persons aged =65 years were 30.5%, 36.6%, and 69.3%, respectively, which indicated that vaccination rates in the 2005–06 season had not returned to levels observed before the vaccine shortage of 2004–05. Influenza epidemics occur seasonally and result in substantial morbidity and mortality among adults in the United States. Among adults annual influenza vaccination is recommended for anyone who wants it for their own protection as well as for prevention of transmission to others, but especially for all persons aged >50 years and persons 18-49 years of age with high-risk conditions. To evaluate state-specific recent progress toward the HP2010 objectives, we compared data from the 2004 and 2006 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS) surveys, which reflected vaccine received for the 2003-2004 and 2005-2006 influenza seasons. In the 2005-06 season, influenza vaccination coverage levels among persons aged 18-49 years with high-risk conditions, persons aged 50-64 years, and persons aged =65 years were 30.5%, 36.6%, and 69.3%, respectively. Influenza vaccination coverage for the 2005–06 season remained substantially below HP2010 targets in all states and was four to nine median percentage points lower than coverage during the 2003–04 season. Thus, vaccination rates in the 2005–06 season had not returned to levels observed before the vaccine shortage of 2004–05. Comprehensive measures are more widely needed to improve influenza vaccination coverage among adult populations in the United States.

Influenza Vaccination Coverage Among Children Aged 6–23 Months — United States, September–December, 2005–06 Influenza Season

PRESS CONTACT: CDC Division of Media Relations
(404) 639-3286

According to the National Immunization Survey, 31.9% of children in the US aged 6-23 months received at least 1 dose of influenza vaccine in the 2005-2006 influenza season and 20.6% were fully vaccinated according to Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) recommendations; there was substantial variability among states. Children aged <2 years are at increased risk for influenza-related hospitalizations, and those aged <5 years have more influenza-related health-care visits than older children. In 2004, the ACIP recommended annual influenza vaccination of children aged 6–23 months, with 2 doses at least 4 weeks apart for those receiving influenza vaccination for the first time. To assess influenza vaccination coverage among children aged 6–23 months during the 2005–06 influenza season, data from the 2006 National Immunization Survey (NIS) were analyzed. The findings indicate that 32% of children in this age group received at least 1 dose of influenza vaccine and 21% were fully vaccinated according to ACIP recommendations, with substantial variability among states. The results underscore the need to continue to monitor childhood influenza vaccination coverage among young children and develop systems to more efficiently provide influenza vaccination services.

Influenza Vaccination Coverage Among Children Aged 6–59 Months — Six Immunization Information System Sentinel Sites, United States, 2006–07 Influenza Season

PRESS CONTACT: CDC Division of Media Relations
(404) 639-3286

Public health officials should consider Immunization Information Systems (IIS) an important way to rapidly assess influenza vaccination coverage during or shortly following an influenza season. This information can help to increase influenza vaccination coverage by alerting officials to areas with low vaccine coverage during the season and help shape the public health message for the next season. This is the first assessment of influenza vaccination coverage among children 6-59 months of age during the 2006-07 influenza season. Findings from 6 IIS, indicate that at all 6 sites, <30% of children aged 6–23 months and <20% of children aged 24–59 months were fully vaccinated. IIS can help public health officials monitor vaccination coverage among children by tracking local data throughout the influenza season. Such tracking can alert local and state public health agencies to gaps in coverage during the influenza season, in time to recommend vaccination for those children who are not fully vaccinated against influenza.

Laboratory Surveillance for Wild and Vaccine-Derived Polioviruses

PRESS CONTACT: CDC Division of Media Relations
(404) 639-3286

The Global Polio Laboratory Network (GPLN) provides critical, detailed laboratory data in support of the WHO Global Polio Eradication Initiative (PEI). The data are used to identify endemic reservoir areas so that immunization activities can be most effectively targeted and vaccine strategies optimized. The laboratory data also inform plans for eventual OPV cessation. The GPLN continues to maintain high performance standards despite challenges of ever increasing workloads, particularly in polio-endemic regions. The GPLN continues to be responsive to the changing needs of the PEI, for example by implementing a new diagnostic algorithm for cutting the time for poliovirus identification in half and developing more sensitive methods for detecting genetically divergent vaccine-derived polioviruses.

Progress in Measles Control — Kenya, 2002–2007

PRESS CONTACT: CDC Division of Media Relations
(404) 639-3286

This article shows that supplementary measles vaccination campaigns can help increase coverage of other life-saving interventions to high levels though delaying a campaign may allow a large measles outbreak to occur. Kenya cut measles cases by over 99% from 2002 – 2004 as the result of a well-done large-scale vaccination campaign, and improved routine vaccination services, disease surveillance and measles case management. In 2005 Kenya delayed a scheduled follow-up campaign to 2006 to include distribution of another life-saving measure, long-lasting insecticide-treated bednets that can prevent malaria. The delay allowed >90% of children at risk for malaria to receive a treated bednet, but during that time a measles outbreak occurred affecting approximately 2500 people and leading to at least 24 deaths. Despite the documented advantages of integrating measles supplemental immunization activities (SIAs) with other life-saving interventions, in some countries, consideration should be given to the risks of delaying measles SIAs in order to gain the benefits of the other interventions.

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U.S. DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES

  • Historical Document: September 20, 2007
  • Content source: Office of Enterprise Communication
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