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Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report

Vulvar Vaccinia Infection after Sexual Contact with a Military Smallpox Vaccinee – Alaska, 2006

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(404) 639-1143


Health-care providers and public health professionals should ask about any contact with recent smallpox vaccinees when evaluating patients with vesicular lesions compatible with vaccinia. This pertains to lesions observed on all parts of the body, including the eye and genital regions. Early identification of such an exposure allows for rapid and appropriate diagnostic testing, timely contact tracing and clinical intervention as needed. In addition, correct, early diagnosis facilitates prompt patient counseling to prevent further transmission of the virus. Since February, 2007, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and the U.S. Department of Defense have received five reports of vaccinia infection associated with military service members being recently vaccinated for smallpox, including two cases from Indiana and one case each from Alabama, Alaska, and New Mexico. The case in Alaska occurred in October, 2006 and was identified in February, 2007. Unintentional transfer of vaccinia virus can occur from a vaccination site to a second site on the vaccinee or to another person, principally via skin-to-skin contact; in addition to skin lesions, genital lesions can also manifest after contact with infectious material from a vaccination site. This report describes a case of vulvar vaccinia caused by sexual interactions with a U.S. service member who had recently received a smallpox vaccination.

Prevalence of Actions to Control High Blood Pressure – 20 States, 2005

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(770) 488-5131


Although many people are taking action to control their high blood pressure (HBP), approximately 70 percent of those with HBP do not presently have it under control. This demonstrates the need for a comprehensive approach that includes lifestyle modifications: improvements in the areas of diet, alcohol consumption, and exercise, and taking prescribed medications. Roughly one in three American adults have high blood pressure (HBP), which increases the chances for developing heart disease or stroke. Most people with HBP do not have it under control. Individuals can help to control their high blood pressure through therapeutic lifestyle changes and taking medication. Among adults with HBP participating in the 2005 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System that analyzed data from 20 states, 70.9 percent changed their eating habits, 79.5 percent decreased use of salt or did not use salt, 79.2 percent reduced consumption of alcohol or did not drink alcohol, 68.6 percent exercised, and 73.4 percent took medication to lower their blood pressure. Women were more likely than men to report changing eating habits and reducing consumption of alcohol or not drinking alcohol. The study also found that women were more likely than men to report changing eating habits and reducing consumption of alcohol or not drinking alcohol. Other data in the study show variation in actions taken to control HBP presented by state, age, sex, and by racial/ethnic groups.

Projected 2030 Prevalence of Self-Reported Doctor-Diagnosed Arthritis and Arthritis Attributable Activity Limitation – United States

PRESS CONTACT: CDC — National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion
Office of Communication
(770) 488-5131


By 2030, the prevalence of arthritis will increase more than 30 percent in 14 states, including over 1 million new cases each in California, Florida, and Texas. These state-specific data released in this study can assist policymakers and healthcare providers in planning use of resources and expanding awareness of the burden of arthritis as well as highlighting the need for wide dissemination of effective strategies to prevent or reduce the symptoms of arthritis and to lessen the disability associated with arthritis. According to prior CDC estimates, it is projected that 67 million adults will have doctor-diagnosed arthritis (DRDX) of which 25 million will have arthritis-attributable activity limitations (AAAL) by 2030. The current MMWR study, which uses data collected from the 2005 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS) and the U.S. Census projected state population data for 2010-2030, projects a substantial increase of an estimated 16 percent of adults having DRDX and AAAL in 48 states with the exceptions of North Dakota, West Virginia and District of Columbia. The study also found that 14 states are anticipated to have increases ranging from 30 percent to 87 percent, including more than a million new people affected each in California, Florida, and Texas. In general, the biggest projected increases in DRDX and AAAL are expected to occur in the “sunbelt” and western states. The findings of this study points to the need for wide dissemination of existing evidence-based interventions (physical activity and self-management education) and strategies (early diagnosis and weight management) capable of maintaining the health and improving the quality of live of those diagnosed with arthritis.

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U.S. DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES

  • Historical Document: May 3, 2007
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