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Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report

Workers´ Memorial Day — April 28, 2007

PRESS CONTACT: CDC — Fred Blosser, Office of Communications
National Institute of Occupational Safety and Health
(202) 260-8519


April 28 is Workers´ Memorial Day—a day of remembrance for those workers who died or were injured on the job. April 28 is Workers´ Memorial Day. This day was established to remember those workers who died or were injured on the job. If it is an average work day in the US, 16 workers will die from an occupational injury; 134 workers will died from a work-related disease; and many thousands of workers will receive medical treatment for a nonfatal injury or illness sustained at work.

Lead Exposure among Women of Child-Bearing Age — United States, 2004

PRESS CONTACT: CDC — Fred Blosser, Office of Communications
National Institute of Occupational Safety and Health
(202) 260-8519


Three messages to take away from the article: 1) Women of childbearing age occupationally exposed to lead in battery manufacturing and certain other industries are at significant potential risk of elevated blood lead levels, and may such cases likely are not report or recognized. 2) For women who have elevated levels while pregnant, risks exist for later developmental problems in their children. 3) Efforts are needed to identify women at potential risk, make them aware of the potential risk to their offspring, and to counsel them about safety regulations and the need for routine testing for elevated blood lead levels in workers who are manufacturing plants. For centuries, exposure to high concentrations of lead had been known to cause health hazards. A new study finds high rates of elevated blood lead levels in women of childbearing age who work in manufacturing plants including battery manufacturing plants and are exposed to lead in battery manufacturing and certain other industries. The study suggests moreover that the prevalence of such cases is probably underestimated because many women are not aware of the problem and are not tested for blood lead concentrations. The study points to the need to identify women at risk, to make them aware that elevated blood lead levels in pregnant women are associated with later developmental problems in their children, and to counsel them about safety regulations and diagnostic screenings so that such problems are prevented.

Nonfatal Occupational Injuries and Illnesses — United States, 2004

PRESS CONTACT: CDC — Fred Blosser, Office of Communications
National Institute of Occupational Safety and Health
(202) 260-8519


Since 1996, the overall number and rate of workers treated in U.S. emergency departments for occupational injuries/illnesses have not changed substantially. To achieve a reduction in these injuries and illnesses, more emphasis should be placed on evaluating and disseminating successful safety practices. In 2004, an estimated 3.4 million workers were treated in U.S. hospital emergency departments for nonfatal occupational injuries and illnesses. Young workers continue to have the highest rate of injuries and illnesses. Older workers are at risk of serious falls. These trends have not changed in recent years. Safe work practices that have been evaluated for effectiveness need to be targeted to workers at highest risk and to reduce exposure to workplace hazards with the greatest potential for causing severe injury or death. Fall protection is one of many examples.

Fixed Obstructive Lung Disease in Food-Flavoring Production Workers — California, 2004-2006

PRESS CONTACT: CDC — Fred Blosser, Office of Communications
National Institute of Occupational Safety and Health
(202) 260-8519


Seven cases of the debilitating and potentially fatal lung disease bronchiolitis obliterans, known as "popcorn workers lung," have been found among employees in some flavoring manufacturing plants in California. The cases point up the importance of recognizing the risk of this preventable disease in workplaces where butter flavorings are made and used, identifying cases, and controlling exposures, as illustrated in the California investigations."

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U.S. DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES

  • Historical Document: April 26, 2007
  • Content source: Office of Enterprise Communication
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