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Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report

Fatal Occupational Injuries — United States, 2005

PRESS CONTACT: CDC — National Institute of Occupational Health
Office of Communication
(202) 401-0721


Although substantial improvements have been made to prevent deaths from work-related injuries, preventable deaths continue to occur at a rate of almost 16 deaths per day with transportation incidents as the leading cause. To substantially reduce the number of workplace deaths, implementation and dissemination of prevention strategies must continue to target high-risk worker populations particularly those involved in transportation activities. Highway and transportation incidents are the leading cause of work-related deaths, followed by falls and being struck by an object, and such fatal injuries have increased over the past decade. From 1992 to 2005, the numbers of fatal occupational injuries resulting from highway incidents, falls, and being struck by an object have increased and the number of homicides has decreased. This report highlights the Census of Fatal Occupational Injury (CFOI) data from 2005, the data indicate that the highest percentages of fatal workplace injuries were attributed to highway incidents, followed by falls, being struck by an object, and homicides. In 2005, approximately 43 percent of the fatal occupational injuries resulted from transportation incidents (predominately highway incidents which accounted for 25 percent of all deaths), 18 percent involved contact with objects or equipment, 14 percent resulted from assaults and violent acts, and 13 percent involved falls.

To substantially reduce the number of workplace deaths, implementation and dissemination of prevention strategies must continue to target high-risk worker populations particularly those involved in transportation activities.

Racial/Ethnic Differences in Fruit and Vegetable Consumption and Physical Activity — United States, 2005

PRESS CONTACT: CDC - National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion
Office of Communication
(770) 488-5131


This report demonstrates some racial/ethnic differences in the combined prevalence of fruit and vegetable consumption and physical activity. The low prevalence found among all groups underscores the need to promote diets high in fruits and vegetables and regular physical activity among all Americans. Consuming a diet high in fruits and vegetables and engaging in regular physical activity is associated with lower risks for chronic diseases. Data from the 2005 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS) survey found that only 1 in 7 (14.6 percent) American adults reported engaging in the combination of these two behaviors. Among men, multi-racial/others (16.5 percent) have a significantly higher prevalence of consuming 5 or more fruits and vegetables and engaging in regular physical activity than whites (12.6 percent). Among women, blacks (12.6 percent) and Hispanics (14.8 percent) have a significantly lower prevalence of consuming 5 or more fruits and vegetables and regular physical activity compared to whites (17.4 percent). This report suggests the need to encourage more people to eat a diet high in fruits and vegetables and to engage in regular physical activity.

Elimination of Measles — Republic of Korea, 2001

PRESS CONTACT: CDC - David Sniadack, MD, MPH
(404) 639-8575

The combination of effective strategies high routine coverage ensured by school entry requirements, wide age range measles vaccination campaigns, and case based surveillance was effective in interrupting measles virus transmission in South Korea. In late 2006, South Korea became the first country in the WHO Western Pacific Region to declare measles elimination. As recently as 2000-2001, a large measles epidemic in the country resulted in 55,000 reported cases and 7 deaths. Several strategies led to the successful elimination of measles from the country. 1) A primary school entry requirement for documentation of a second dose of measles vaccine was implemented in 2001, resulting in up to 99 percent coverage among 7-year olds. 2) Implementation of a nationwide measles vaccination campaign among children aged 8-16 in 2001, which achieved high coverage (97 percent of the target population).

Implementation of case-based measles surveillance and collection of clinical specimens.

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U.S. DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES

  • Historical Document: April 5, 2007
  • Content source: Office of Enterprise Communication
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