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MMWR
Synopsis for November 9, 2006

The MMWR is embargoed until Thursday, 12 PM EST.

  1. State Medicaid Coverage for Tobacco-Dependence Treatments United States, 2005
  2. Outbreak of Wild Poliovirus Type 1 Cases in Adults Namibia, 2006
  3. Diagnosed Diabetes among American Indians and Alaska Natives Age Greater Than 35 Years United States
  4. West Nile Virus Activity United States, January 1-November 7, 2006
There will be no MMWR telebriefing scheduled for
November 09, 2006

State Medicaid Coverage for Tobacco-Dependence Treatments United States, 2005

CDC
NCCDPHP
Office of Communications
(770) 488-5131

Dramatic increases in coverage must occur to achieve the 2010 national health objective of increasing insurance coverage of evidence-based treatments for tobacco dependence among all 51 Medicaid programs. In 2004, of approximately 41 million Americans who received health insurance coverage through the Medicaid programs, an estimated 29% were current smokers. The amount and type of coverage for tobacco-dependence treatment offered by Medicaid has been reported since 1998. All states and DC were surveyed again in 2005 about the amount and type of coverage they provided. This report summarizes the results of the survey, which indicates that in 2005, 1) 38 Medicaid programs covered some tobacco-dependence counseling or medication for all Medicaid recipients, compared with 37 in 2003; 2) an additional four states offered coverage only for pregnant women; and 3) only one state (Oregon) offered coverage for all medication and counseling treatments recommended by the 2000 U.S. Public Health Service guideline.

Outbreak of Wild Poliovirus Type 1 Cases in Adults Namibia, 2006

CDC
Division of Media Relations
(404) 639-3286

Polio outbreak response immunization rounds should include populations at risk, based on the age of the persons affected by the outbreak. Nineteen young adults in Namibia contracted polio during an outbreak there beginning in May 2006. The outbreak was traced to poliovirus importation from neighboring Angola that had originated in India. This outbreak demonstrates that populations of any age with low immunity against poliovirus are at risk of the disease. Namibia responded by intensifying surveillance for polio and by quickly conducting three large scale immunization rounds, the first one less than three weeks after the first case was confirmed. No confirmed cases of polio have been reported in the country since late June and the outbreak appears to have been curbed. However, the threat of polio importations from endemic countries is ongoing.

Diagnosed Diabetes among American Indians and Alaska Natives Aged Greater Than 35 Years United States, 1994-2004

Positive results from clinical trials aimed at prevention of diabetes among adults at risk suggest that lifestyle interventions to reduce overweight and increase physical activity can be effective among children. Losing as little as 10 pounds, walking 30 minutes five days a week and making healthy food choices have been shown to prevent or delay diabetes. Diabetes is a growing public health problem among young American Indians and Alaska Natives (AIAN). Recent findings indicate that the rate of existing cases among AIAN younger than age 35 doubled between 1994 and 2004. The increase in this age group is of particular concern because the earlier onset of diabetes increases the lifetime duration of disease and thus the risk for developing costly and disabling complications.

West Nile Virus Activity United States, January 1 November 7, 2006

No Summary Available

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Department of Health and Human Services


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This page last reviewed November 9, 2006

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