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MMWR
Synopsis for November 4, 2005

The MMWR is embargoed until Thursday, 12 PM EDT.

  1. Incidence of End-Stage Renal Disease Among Persons With Diabetes United States, 1990-2002
  2. Global Measles and Rubella Laboratory Network, January 2004 June 2005
  3. Update: Ralstonia Species Associated with Vapotherm Oxygen Delivery Devices United States, 2005
  4. Update: West Nile Virus Activity United States, 2005
There is no MMWR Telebriefing scheduled for November 3, 2005

Incidence of End-Stage Renal Disease among Persons with Diabetes United States, 1990-2002

The decline in incidence of kidney failure represents an encouraging trend in this serious complication of diabetes. To continue improving this trend, persons with diabetes or high blood pressure should talk with their doctor and get checked for kidney disease.

PRESS CONTACT:
CDC
National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion
Office of Communication
(770) 488-5131
 

Diabetes is the leading cause of end-stage renal disease (ESRD) (i.e., kidney failure requiring dialysis or transplantation) in the United States, accounting for 44 percent of new cases of treated ESRD in 2002. Our findings indicate that, although the number of new cases of ESRD-DM continues to increase, the incidence of ESRD-DM among persons with diabetes is no longer increasing among persons aged 6574 years, men, blacks, and Hispanics, and it is declining among those younger than 65 years, women, and whites. Continued interventions to reduce the prevalence of kidney disease risk factors, such as blood sugar and blood pressure control, and improve the level of diabetes care are needed to sustain and improve these trends.

Global Measles and Rubella Laboratory Network,
January 2004 June 2005

An effective worldwide measles/rubella laboratory network has been developed which supports the control and elimination of measles and rubella.

PRESS CONTACT:
Dave Daigle

CDC, National Center for Infectious Diseases
(404) 639-1143
 

Measles and rubella control and elimination programs depend on effective global surveillance. Serological testing and genetic characterization performed within the Measles and Rubella Laboratory Network (LabNet) improves the accuracy of case identification and confirmation, thus improving the quality of disease surveillance. About 190 laboratories worldwide can now perform IgM testing on sera from suspected cases, and virological (genotyping) information is now available on viruses from every WHO region. Genotype information can help to document viral transmission pathways, aid in case classification, and help to document the elimination of endemic disease. Both surveillance activities and vaccination programs must be continued in countries where measles or rubella have been eliminated, since there is still a threat of disease importation from endemic areas.

Update: Ralstonia Species Associated with Vapotherm Oxygen Delivery Devices United States, 2005

PRESS CONTACT:
CDC
Division of Media Relations
(404) 639-3286
 

No Summary Available.

 



Update: West Nile Virus Activity United States, 2005

PRESS CONTACT:
CDC
Division of Media Relations
(404) 639-3286
 

No Summary Available.

 

 





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This page last reviewed November 3, 2005
URL: http://www.cdc.gov/media/mmwrnews/n051104.htm

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